Intervention Review

Interventions other than anticoagulants and systemic antibiotics for prevention of central venous catheter-related infections in children with cancer

  1. Ramandeep S Arora1,*,
  2. Rebecca Roberts2,
  3. Tim OB Eden3,
  4. Barry Pizer4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Childhood Cancer Group

Published Online: 8 DEC 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 12 JUL 2009

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007785.pub2


How to Cite

Arora RS, Roberts R, Eden TOB, Pizer B. Interventions other than anticoagulants and systemic antibiotics for prevention of central venous catheter-related infections in children with cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD007785. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007785.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Manchester, Cancer Research UK Paediatric and Familial Research Group, Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    University of Manchester, Manchester, UK

  3. 3

    Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Young Oncology Unit, Manchester, UK

  4. 4

    Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Oncology Unit, Liverpool, UK

*Ramandeep S Arora, Cancer Research UK Paediatric and Familial Research Group, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. reemaraman@doctors.org.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 8 DEC 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Use of central venous catheters (CVC) in treatment of children with cancer is associated with infective complications. Current evidence-based guidelines to prevent catheter-related infections are mainly relevant to the adult population. They are not cancer (especially not childhood cancer) specific. Two existing Cochrane reviews have looked at prophylactic antibiotics and anticoagulants to prevent CVC-related infections.

Objectives

The primary objective was to find which interventions, if any, were effective in preventing CVC-related infections in children with cancer. Further objectives were to examine the effectiveness of each intervention in the following subgroups: implanted versus external catheters, haematological versus non-haematological malignancies, and in those receiving haematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) versus no HSCT.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4), MEDLINE (January 1950 to January 2009), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2009) and CINAHL(R) (January 1982 to March 2009). We also searched reference lists of relevant articles and proceedings of relevant international conferences (2004 to 2008).

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised studies comparing any intervention (other than anticoagulants, systemic antibiotics and antibiotic lock techniques) versus no intervention, placebo or any other intervention to prevent CVC-related infections in children with cancer.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently selected studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Where necessary, we contacted study authors for further data and clarification of methods.

Main results

Three trials involving two different interventions were included. Two trials involving 680 children compared flushing CVC with urokinase (with or without heparin) versus heparin alone. Neither of these trials reported on the primary outcome of catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI). There was a non-significantly decreased rate of catheter-associated infection (CAI) (Rate Ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.12 to 4.41) in the urokinase (with or without heparin) arm compared with the heparin arm.

One trial involving 113 children compared frequency of catheter dressing change every 15 days versus every 4 days. It did not report on CRBSI or CAI. There were no premature catheter removals for infection in either of the trial arms.

Authors' conclusions

Three RCTs for only two types of interventions to prevent CVC-related infections in children with cancer have been identified. Flushing CVC with urokinase (with or without heparin) compared to heparin alone possibly leads to decrease in CAI rates. Changing catheter dressings every 15 days versus every 4 days does not lead to more premature catheter removals due to infection although data were insufficient to assess if catheter-related infection rates were changed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions to prevent central venous catheter-related infections in children with cancer

Treatment of children with cancer often involves giving drugs, fluids and blood products through veins. In addition, small amounts of blood from the child are frequently needed for testing in the laboratory. All this can be achieved by inserting a central venous catheter (CVC) which is a small tube inserted via skin into the blood vessel in the neck or the armpit. This allows repeated testing and treatment of the child with cancer over a period of months while minimising the discomfort. The presence of CVC in the veins also leads to an increased risk of infections which can be life-threatening. Our review systematically assessed the research done on strategies to prevent these infections in children with cancer.

A total of three research studies were identified. Two studies showed that there may be a decrease in CVC-related blood infections if the space in the CVC was washed and filled at regular intervals with urokinase (a drug which dissolves blood clots) with/without heparin (a drug which prevents the formation of blood clots) compared to heparin alone. One study showed that changing the dressing which covered the skin at the insertion of CVC every 15 days rather than every 4 days did not lead to an increased removal of the CVC because they had become infected. No research studies were identified for several other potential strategies which could reduce CVC-related infections in children with cancer.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Intervenciones diferentes de los anticoagulantes y antibióticos sistémicos para la prevención de las infecciones relacionadas con el catéter venoso central en niños con cáncer

El uso de los catéteres venosos centrales (CVC) en el tratamiento de los niños con cáncer se asocia con complicaciones infecciosas. Las guías actuales basadas en la evidencia para prevenir las infecciones relacionadas con el catéter se refieren principalmente a la población adulta, y no son específicas del cáncer (sobre todo el cáncer infantil). Dos revisiones Cochrane han estudiado los antibióticos profilácticos y los anticoagulantes para prevenir las infecciones relacionadas con el CVC.

Objetivos

El objetivo primario fue encontrar qué intervenciones, si hubiera alguna, fueron efectivas para prevenir las infecciones relacionadas con el CVC en niños con cáncer. Otros objetivos fueron analizar la efectividad de cada intervención en los siguientes subgrupos: catéteres implantados versus externos, neoplasias hematológicas versus no hematológicas y en niños que recibieron trasplantes de célula madre hematopoyética (TCMH) versus los que no los recibieron.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en el Registro Cochrane Central de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2008, número 4), MEDLINE (enero 1950 hasta enero 2009), EMBASE (enero 1980 hasta enero 2009) y CINAHL(R) (enero 1982 hasta marzo 2009). Además, se realizaron búsquedas en las listas de referencias de artículos y actas relevantes de congresos internacionales pertinentes (2004 a 2008).

Criterios de selección

Los estudios aleatorios y cuasialeatorios que compararon cualquier intervención (diferente de los anticoagulantes, antibióticos sistémicos y técnicas de bloqueo antibiótico) versus ninguna intervención, placebo u otra intervención para prevenir las infecciones relacionadas con el CVC en niños con cáncer.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores de forma independiente seleccionaron los estudios, evaluaron la calidad de los ensayos y extrajeron los datos. Cuando fue necesario, se estableció contacto con los autores de los estudios para obtener datos adicionales y aclaraciones acerca de los métodos.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron tres ensayos que implicaban dos intervenciones diferentes. Dos ensayos que incluyeron a 680 niños compararon el lavado del CVC con uroquinasa (con o sin heparina) versus la heparina sola. Ninguno de estos ensayos informó acerca del resultado primario de bacteriemia relacionada con el catéter (BRC). Hubo una disminución no significativa de la tasa de infección asociada con el catéter (IAC) (Cociente de tasas 0,72; intervalo de confianza del 95%: 0,12 a 4,41) en el brazo de uroquinasa (con o sin heparina) comparado con el brazo de heparina.

Un ensayo que incluyó a 113 niños comparó la frecuencia del cambio del vendaje del catéter cada 15 días versus cada cuatro días. No se informó BRC o IAC. No hubo ninguna extracción prematura de catéteres por infección en ninguno de los brazos del ensayo.

Conclusiones de los autores

Se han identificado tres ECA de sólo dos tipos de intervenciones para la prevención de infecciones relacionadas con el CVC en niños con cáncer. El lavado del CVC con uroquinasa (con o sin heparina) comparado con la heparina sola posiblemente lleve a una disminución en las tasas de IAC. El cambio de vendaje del catéter cada 15 días versus cada cuatro días no resulta en una extracción prematura del catéter debido a la infección, aunque los datos no fueron suficientes como para evaluar si hubo cambios en las tasas de infección relacionada con el catéter.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions autres que les anticoagulants et les antibiotiques systémiques pour la prévention d'infections liées aux cathéters veineux centraux chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer

Contexte

L'utilisation de cathéters veineux centraux (CVC) dans le traitement d'enfants atteints d'un cancer est associée à des complications infectieuses. Les actuelles recommandations fondées sur des preuves visant à prévenir des infections liées au cathéter concernent principalement la population adulte. Elles ne sont pas spécifiques au cancer (certainement pas au cancer de l'enfant). Deux revues Cochrane existantes ont étudié les antibiotiques prophylactiques et les anticoagulants pour la prévention d'infections liées à un CVC.

Objectifs

L'objectif principal était de déterminer d'éventuelles interventions efficaces pour la prévention d'infections liées à un CVC chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer. Les autres objectifs consistaient à examiner l'efficacité de chaque intervention dans les sous-groupes suivants : cathéters implantés et externes, malignités hématologiques et non hématologiques et les patients bénéficiant d'une greffe de cellules souches hématopoïétiques (GCSH) et ceux ne recevant aucune GCSH.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2008, numéro 4), MEDLINE (de janvier 1950 à janvier 2009), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à janvier 2009) et CINAHL(R) (de janvier 1982 à mars 2009). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les listes bibliographiques des articles pertinents et les actes de conférences internationales pertinentes (de 2004 à 2008).

Critères de sélection

Des études randomisées et quasi randomisées comparant toute intervention (autres que les anticoagulants, les antibiotiques systémiques et les techniques de verrous antibiotiques) à l'absence d'intervention, un placebo ou toute autre intervention pour prévenir les infections liées à un CVC chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment sélectionné des études, évalué leur qualité méthodologique et extrait des données. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des études afin d'obtenir des données supplémentaires et des clarifications concernant les méthodes utilisées, le cas échéant.

Résultats Principaux

Trois essais impliquant deux interventions différentes ont été inclus. Deux essais, impliquant 680 enfants, comparaient le nettoyage d'un CVC avec de l'urokinase (avec ou sans héparine) à l'héparine seule. Aucun de ces essais n'a rendu compte du critère de jugement principal concernant une septicémie liée au cathéter (SLC). Il y avait une baisse non significative du taux d'infection liée au cathéter (ILC) (rapport de risques 0,72, intervalle de confiance à 95 % 0,12 à 4,41) dans le bras de l'urokinase (avec ou sans héparine) par rapport au bras de l'héparine.

Un essai, impliquant 113 enfants, comparait la fréquence de changement du pansement du cathéter tous les 15 jours à un changement tous les 4 jours. Il ne signalait aucune SLC ou ILC. Il n'y avait aucun retrait prématuré du cathéter pour cause d'infection dans aucun des bras de l'essai.

Conclusions des auteurs

Trois ECR concernant uniquement deux types d'interventions visant à prévenir les infections liées à un CVC chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer ont été identifiés. Le nettoyage du CVC avec de l'urokinase (avec ou sans héparine), comparé à l'héparine seule, peut éventuellement faire baisser les taux d'ILC. Le changement du pansement du cathéter tous les 15 jours par rapport à un changement tous les 4 jours n'augmente pas le nombre de retraits prématurés du cathéter pour cause d'infection, malgré des données insuffisantes pour évaluer si les taux d'infection liée au cathéter avaient changé.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions autres que les anticoagulants et les antibiotiques systémiques pour la prévention d'infections liées aux cathéters veineux centraux chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer

Interventions pour la prévention d'infections liées aux cathéters veineux centraux chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer

Le traitement d'enfants atteints d'un cancer implique généralement l'administration de médicaments, liquides et produits sanguins par voie veineuse. De plus, de petits prélèvements sanguins sont fréquemment effectués chez l'enfant afin d'être testés en laboratoire. Tout ceci peut être réalisé à l'aide d'un cathéter veineux central (CVC) qui est formé d'une petite tubulure insérée par voie cutanée dans les vaisseaux sanguins au niveau du cou ou de la racine du bras. Ceci permet d'effectuer des tests répétés et d'administrer un traitement à un enfant atteint d'un cancer sur une période de plusieurs mois tout en minimisant la gêne. Un CVC inséré dans une veine accroît aussi les risques d'infections potentiellement mortelles. Notre revue a systématiquement évalué les recherches effectuées sur les stratégies visant à prévenir ces infections chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer.

Au total, trois études de recherche ont été identifiées. Deux études montraient une possible diminution des infections sanguines liées à un CVC à condition que l'intérieur du CVC soit nettoyé et rempli à intervalles réguliers avec de l'urokinase (médicament qui dissout les caillots sanguins) avec/sans héparine (médicament qui prévient la formation de caillots sanguins) par rapport à l'héparine seule. Une étude a montré que le changement du pansement du cathéter recouvrant la peau à l'emplacement d'insertion du CVC tous les 15 jours au lieu de tous les 4 jours n'augmentait pas le nombre de retraits de CVC en raison de leur infection. Aucune étude de recherche concernant plusieurs autres éventuelles stratégies susceptibles de réduire les infections liées au CVC chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer n'a été identifiée.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th September, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français