Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Chinese herbal medicine for diabetic peripheral neuropathy

  1. Wei Chen1,*,
  2. Yin Zhang2,
  3. Xinxue Li1,
  4. Guoyan Yang1,
  5. Jian Ping Liu1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 6 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 14 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007796.pub3


How to Cite

Chen W, Zhang Y, Li X, Yang G, Liu JP. Chinese herbal medicine for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD007796. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007796.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China

  2. 2

    Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medicine, Center of Clinical Evaluation, Beijing, China

*Wei Chen, Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 11 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100029, China. chen7916@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 6 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Chinese herbal medicine is frequently used for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy in China. Many controlled trials have been undertaken to investigate its efficacy.

This is an update of a Cochrane review that was first published in the year 2011.

Objectives

To assess the beneficial effects and harms of Chinese herbal medicine for people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Search methods

On 14 May 2012, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register CENTRAL (2012, Issue 4 in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2012), AMED (January 1985 to May 2012) and in October 2012, the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1979 to October 2012), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI) (1979 to October 2012), and VIP Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (1989 to October 2012). We searched for unpublished literature in the Chinese Conference Papers Database, and Chinese Dissertation Database (from inception to October 2012). There were no language or publication restrictions.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicine (with a minimum of four weeks treatment duration) for people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with placebo, no intervention, or conventional interventions. Trials of herbal medicine plus a conventional drug versus the drug alone were also included.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted data and evaluated trial quality. We contacted study authors for additional information.

Main results

Forty-nine randomised trials involving 3639 participants were included. All trials were conducted and published in China. Thirty-eight different herbal medicines were tested in these trials, including four single herbs (extracts from a single herb), eight traditional Chinese patent medicines, and 26 self concocted Chinese herbal compound prescriptions. The trials reported on global symptom improvement (including improvement in numbness or pain) and changes in nerve conduction velocity. The positive results described from the 49 studies of low quality are of questionable significance. There was inadequate reporting on adverse events in the included trials. Eighteen trials found no adverse events. Two trials reported adverse events: adverse events occurred in the control group in one trial, and in the other it was unclear in which group the adverse events occurred. 29 trials did not mention whether they monitored adverse events. Conclusions cannot be drawn from this review about the safety of herbal medicines, due to inadequate reporting. Most of the trials were of very low methodological quality and therefore the interpretation of any positive findings for the efficacy of the included Chinese herbal medicines for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy should be made with caution.

Authors' conclusions

Based on this systematic review, there is no evidence to support the objective effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. No well-designed, randomised, placebo controlled trial with objective outcome measures has been conducted.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Chinese herbal medicine for treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common complications of diabetes. It is characterised by a progressive loss of nerve fibres that predisposes the person to painful or insensitive extremities, ulceration and amputation, and results in a large disease burden in terms of incapacity for work, quality of life and use of healthcare resources. This systematic review identified a total of 49 trials that included 3639 participants with DPN. Ten of the trials were new at this first update of the review. We evaluated the effects of various herbal formulations (including single herbs, Chinese proprietary medicines and mixtures of different herbs) for treating people with DPN. All the identified clinical trials were performed and published in China. The trials reported on global symptom improvement (including improvement in numbness or pain) and changes in nerve conduction velocity. The positive results described from the 49 studies of low quality are of questionable significance. There was inadequate reporting on adverse events in the included trials. Most of the trials did not mention whether they monitored for adverse effects. Only two trials reported adverse events but an adverse event occurred in the control group in one trial and it was unclear in which group they occurred in the other trial. Conclusions about the safety of herbal medicines cannot therefore be drawn from this review due to inadequate reporting. Most of the trials were of very low methodological quality and the interpretation of any positive findings for the efficacy of the included Chinese herbal medicines for treating DPN should be made with caution. Based on this systematic review, there is no evidence to support the objective effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for DPN. No well-designed, randomised placebo controlled trial with objective outcome measures has been conducted.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les plantes médicinales chinoises contre la neuropathie diabétique périphérique

Contexte

Les plantes médicinales chinoises sont souvent utilisés en Chine dans le traitement de la neuropathie diabétique périphérique. De nombreux essais contrôlés ont été réalisés pour évaluer leur efficacité.

Ceci est une mise à jour d'une revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2011.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets bénéfiques et délétères des plantes médicinales chinoises pour les patients atteints de neuropathie diabétique périphérique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Le 14 mai 2012, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé CENTRAL du groupe Cochrane sur les affections neuromusculaires (La Bibliothèque Cochrane, numéro 4, 2012), dans MEDLINE (de janvier 1966 à mai 2012), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à mai 2012), AMED (de janvier 1985 à mai 2012) et, en octobre 2012, nous avons consulté la Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (de 1979 à octobre 2012), la Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI) (de 1979 à octobre 2012) et la VIP Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (de 1989 à octobre 2012). Nous avons recherché des articles non publiés dans les bases de données Chinese Conference Papers Database et Chinese Dissertation Database (depuis leur création jusqu'en octobre 2012). Aucune restriction de langue ou de publication n'a été appliquée.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés comparant l'utilisation de plantes médicinales chinoises (avec une durée minimale de traitement de quatre semaines) chez des patients atteints de neuropathie diabétique périphérique à l'utilisation d'un placebo, à l'absence d'intervention, ou aux interventions conventionnelles. Les essais comparant l'association des plantes médicinales et d'un médicament traditionnel au traitement par médicament seul ont également été inclus.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont travaillé indépendamment pour extraire les données et évaluer la qualité des essais. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des études pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires.

Résultats Principaux

Quarante-neuf essais randomisés impliquant 3 639 participants ont été inclus. Tous les essais ont été menés et publiés en Chine. Trente-huit plantes médicinales différentes ont été testées dans ces essais, y compris quatre plantes individuelles (extraits d'une seule plante), huit remèdes traditionnels chinois brevetés et 26 préparations personnalisées à base de plantes médicinales chinoises. Les essais signalaient une amélioration globale des symptômes (y compris une amélioration des symptômes d'engourdissement ou de douleur) et des changements dans la vitesse de conduction nerveuse. Le caractère significatif des résultats positifs décrits dans ces 49 études de faible qualité est discutable. Les événements indésirables étaient mal rapportés dans les essais inclus. Dans dix-huit essais, aucun événement indésirable n'a été observé. Deux essais rapportaient des événements indésirables : dans un essai, les événements indésirables étaient survenus dans le groupe témoin, l'autre essai ne spécifiait pas dans quel groupe les événements indésirables étaient survenus. Dans 29 essais, aucune mention n'était faite au sujet d'une surveillance des événements indésirables. Aucune conclusion ne peut être tirée de cette revue sur l'innocuité des plantes médicinales, en raison de l'inadéquation des rapports. La plupart des essais étaient de très faible qualité méthodologique, et les résultats positifs concernant l'efficacité des plantes médicinales chinoises dans le traitement de la neuropathie diabétique périphérique doivent être interprétés avec prudence.

Conclusions des auteurs

D'après cette revue systématique, il n'existe aucune preuve permettant d'affirmer l'efficacité et l'innocuité objectives des plantes médicinales chinoises dans le traitement de la neuropathie diabétique périphérique. Aucun essai randomisé bien conçu, contrôlé contre placebo et avec des critères de jugement objectifs n'a été réalisé.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les plantes médicinales chinoises contre la neuropathie diabétique périphérique

Les plantes médicinales chinoises dans le traitement de la neuropathie diabétique périphérique

La neuropathie diabétique périphérique diabétique (NDP) est l'une des complications les plus courantes du diabète. Elle se caractérise par une perte progressive de fibres nerveuses qui prédispose à des douleurs ou à une insensibilité aux extrémités, à une ulcération et à une amputation, et constitue un fardeau important en termes d'incapacité de travail, de qualité de vie et d'utilisation des ressources sanitaires. La présente revue systématique a relevé un total de 49 essais qui incluaient 3 639 participants atteints de NDP. Dix de ces essais étaient nouveaux pour cette première mise à jour de la revue. Nous avons évalué les effets de différentes préparations à base de plantes (y compris des plantes seules, des remèdes chinois brevetés et des mélanges de plantes) pour le traitement des patients atteints de NDP. Tous les essais cliniques analysés ont été effectués et publiés en Chine. Les essais signalaient une amélioration globale des symptômes (y compris l'amélioration des problèmes d'engourdissement ou de douleur) et des changements dans la vitesse de conduction nerveuse. Le caractère significatif des résultats positifs décrits dans ces 49 études de faible qualité est discutable. Les informations concernant les événements indésirables étaient mal rapportées dans les essais inclus. La plupart des essais n'indiquaient pas si les effets indésirables avaient fait l'objet d'un suivi ou non. Seuls deux essais rapportaient l'occurrence d'événements indésirables, mais l'un de ces événements était signalé dans le groupe témoin et, pour l'autre, dans un autre essai, le groupe dans lequel l'événement était survenu était mal indiqué. Aucune conclusions sur l'innocuité des plantes médicinales ne peut donc être tirée de cette revue en raison du caractère inadapté des rapports. La plupart des essais étaient de très faible qualité méthodologique et les résultats positifs concernant l'efficacité des plantes médicinales chinoises dans le traitement de la NDP doivent être interprétés avec prudence. D'après cette revue systématique, il n'existe aucune preuve permettant d'affirmer l'efficacité et l'innocuité objectives des plantes médicinales chinoises dans le traitement de la NDP. Aucun essai randomisé contrôlé par placebo, bien conçu et avec des critères de jugement objectifs n'a été réalisé.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.