Intervention Review

Antioxidants for female subfertility

  1. Marian G Showell1,*,
  2. Julie Brown1,
  3. Jane Clarke1,
  4. Roger J Hart2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group

Published Online: 5 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007807.pub2

How to Cite

Showell MG, Brown J, Clarke J, Hart RJ. Antioxidants for female subfertility. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD007807. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007807.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Auckland, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Auckland, New Zealand

  2. 2

    The University of Western Australia, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Fertility Specialists of Western Australia, School of Women's and Infants' Health, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia

*Marian G Showell, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Auckland, Park Road Grafton, Auckland, New Zealand. m.showell@auckland.ac.nz.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 5 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

A couple may be considered to have fertility problems if they have been trying to conceive for over a year with no success. This difficulty with conception may affect up to a quarter of all couples planning a child. The reported prevalence of subfertility has increased significantly over the past twenty years. It is estimated that for 40% to 50% of couples, subfertility may be a result of female problems, including ovulatory disorders, poor egg quality, fallopian tube damage and endometriosis. Antioxidants are thought to reduce the oxidative stress brought on by these conditions. Currently, limited evidence suggests that antioxidants improve fertility, and trials have explored this area with varied results. This review assessed the evidence for the effectiveness of different antioxidants in female subfertility.

Objectives

To determine whether supplementary oral antioxidants compared with placebo, no treatment/standard treatment or another antioxidant improve fertility outcomes for subfertile women.

Search methods

We searched the following databases (from inception to April 2013) with no language restrictions applied: Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS and OpenSIGLE. We also searched conference abstracts and citation lists in the ISI Web of Knowledge. Ongoing trials were searched in the Trials Registers. Reference lists were checked, and a search on Google was performed.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared any type, dose or combination of oral antioxidant supplement with placebo, no treatment or treatment with another antioxidant, among women attending a reproductive clinic. Trials comparing antioxidants with fertility drugs alone and trials that exclusively included fertile women attending a fertility clinic because of male partner infertility were excluded.

Data collection and analysis

Three review authors independently screened 2127 titles and abstracts, and 67 of these potentially eligible trials were appraised for inclusion and quality through review of full texts and contact with authors. Three review authors were involved in data extraction and assessment of risk of bias. Review authors also collected data on adverse events as reported from the trials. Studies were pooled using fixed-effect models; however, if high heterogeneity was found, a random-effects model was used. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the dichotomous outcomes of live birth, clinical pregnancy and adverse events. Analyses were stratified by type of antioxidant, by indications for subfertility and by those women also undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection techniques (ICSIs). The overall quality of the evidence was assessed by applying GRADE criteria.

Main results

A total of 28 trials involving 3548 women were included in this review. Investigators compared oral antioxidants, including combinations of antioxidants, pentoxifylline, N-acetyl-cysteine, melatonin, L-arginine, vitamin E, myo-inositol, vitamin C, vitamin D+calcium and omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids with placebo, with no treatment/standard treatment or another antioxidant.

Antioxidants were not associated with an increased live birth rate compared with placebo or no treatment/standard treatment (OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.19 to 8.26, P = 0.82, 2 RCTs, 97 women, I2 = 75%, very low-quality evidence). This suggests that among subfertile women with an expected live birth rate of 37%, the rate among women taking antioxidants would be between 10% and 83%.

Antioxidants were not associated with an increased clinical pregnancy rate compared with placebo or no treatment/standard treatment (OR 1.30, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.85, P = 0.14, 13 RCTs, 2441 women, I2= 55%, very low-quality evidence). This suggests that among subfertile women with an expected clinical pregnancy rate of 23%, the rate among women taking antioxidants would be between 22% and 36%.

Only one trial reported on live birth in the antioxidant versus antioxidant comparison, and two trials reported on clinical pregnancy in this comparison. Only subtotals were used in this analysis, and meta-analysis was not possible as each trial used a different antioxidant.

Pentoxifylline was associated with an increased clinical pregnancy rate compared with placebo or no treatment (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.44, P = 0.009, 3 RCTs, 276 women, I2 = 0%).

Adverse events were reported by 14 trials in the meta-analysis and included miscarriage, multiple pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy and gastrointestinal effects. No evidence revealed a difference in adverse effects between antioxidant groups and control groups, but these data were limited.

The overall quality of evidence was 'very low' to 'low' because of poor reporting of outcomes, the number of small studies included, high risk of bias within studies and heterogeneity in the primary analysis.

Authors' conclusions

The quality of the evidence in the 'antioxidant versus placebo/no treatment' and in the 'antioxidant versus antioxidant' comparisons was assessed to be 'very low'. Antioxidants were not associated with an increased live birth rate or clinical pregnancy rate. There was some evidence of an association of pentoxifylline with an increased clinical pregnancy rate; however, there were only three trials included in this comparison. Future trials may change this result. Variation in the types of antioxidants given meant that we could not assess whether one antioxidant was better than another. There did not appear to be any association of antioxidants with adverse effects for women, but data for these outcomes were limited.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Vitamins and minerals for female subfertility

Review question: Do supplementary oral antioxidants compared with placebo, no treatment/standard treatment or another antioxidant improve fertility outcomes for subfertile women (standard treatment includes folic acid < 1 mg).

Background: many subfertile women undergoing fertility treatment also take dietary supplements in the hope of improving their fertility. This can be a very stressful time for women and their partners. It is important that these couples be given high quality evidence that will allow them to make informed decisions on whether taking a supplemental antioxidant when undergoing fertility treatment will improve their chances or cause any adverse effects; this is especially important as most antioxidant supplements are uncontrolled by regulation. This review aimed to assess whether supplements with oral antioxidants increase a subfertile woman's chances of becoming pregnant and having a baby.

Search date: The evidence is current to April 2013.

Study characteristics: The review included 28 randomised controlled trials that compared antioxidants with placebo or no treatment/standard treatment, or with another antioxidant in a total of 3548 women.

Funding sources: Funding sources were reported by only six of the 28 included trials.

Key results: Antioxidants were not found to be effective for increasing rates of live birth or clinical pregnancy. Based on these results, we would expect that out of 100 subfertile women not taking antioxidants, 23 would become pregnant, compared with between 22 and 36 per 100 who would become pregnant if taking antioxidants to improve their chances of becoming pregnant. Antioxidants did not appear to be associated with the adverse events of miscarriage or multiple or ectopic pregnancy.

Quality of the evidence: The quality of the evidence in this review for live birth, clinical pregnancy and adverse effects was rated 'very low' to 'low'.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antioxydants dans l'hypofertilité chez la femme

Contexte

Un couple peut être considéré comme ayant des problèmes d'infertilité si ses tentatives de conception restent infructueuses depuis plus d'un an. Cette difficulté à concevoir peut toucher jusqu'à un quart des couples souhaitant avoir un enfant. La prévalence rapportée de l'hypofertilité a sensiblement augmenté depuis ces vingt dernières années. On estime que chez 40 à 50 % des couples, l'hypofertilité proviendrait de problèmes touchant la femme, notamment des troubles de l'ovulation, des ovules de mauvaise qualité, des lésions au niveau des trompes de Fallope et une endométriose. Les antioxydants réduiraient le stress oxydatif lié à ces affections. À l'heure actuelle, des preuves limitées suggèrent que les antioxydants améliorent la fécondité et des essais ont examiné ce sujet et généré différents résultats. La présente revue a évalué des preuves concernant l'efficacité de différents antioxydants dans l'hypofertilité chez la femme.

Objectifs

Déterminer si la supplémentation orale en antioxydants comparée à un placebo, à l'absence de traitement/traitement standard ou à un autre antioxydant, améliore les résultats de la fécondité chez les femmes hypofertiles.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes (depuis leur création jusqu'à avril 2013) sans appliquer de restrictions linguistiques : le registre d'essais spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les troubles menstruels et de la fertilité, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS et OpenSIGLE. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les actes de congrès et les listes bibliographiques sur le site ISI Web of Knowledge. Les essais en cours ont fait l'objet de recherches dans les registres d'essais cliniques. Les listes bibliographiques ont été consultées et des recherches ont été effectuées sur Google.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant un type, une dose ou une combinaison de suppléments oraux d'antioxydants à un placebo, à l'absence de traitement ou à un traitement administrant un autre antioxydant chez des femmes se rendant à une clinique de fertilité. Les essais comparant des antioxydants à des médicaments contre l'infertilité et les essais incluant exclusivement des femmes fécondes se rendant à une clinique de fertilité en raison de la stérilité de leur partenaire masculin étaient exclus.

Recueil et analyse des données

Trois auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment passé au crible 2 127 titres et résumés, et 67 de ces essais potentiellement éligibles ont été examinés pour leur inclusion, mais aussi pour leur qualité méthodologique, en passant en revue les textes complets et en contactant leurs auteurs. Trois auteurs de la revue ont extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais. Ils ont également collecté des données concernant des événements indésirables tels qu'ils ont été rapportés dans les essais. Les études ont été regroupées en utilisant des modèles à effets fixes. Toutefois, en cas d'hétérogénéité élevée, un modèle à effets aléatoires était utilisé. Des odds ratios (OR) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % ont été calculés pour les résultats dichotomiques concernant les naissances vivantes, les grossesses cliniques et les événements indésirables. Les analyses ont été stratifiées par type d'antioxydant, par indications d'hypofertilité et selon que les femmes faisaient l'objet d'une fécondation in vitro (FIV) ou avaient recours à des techniques d'injection intracytoplasmique de sperme (ICSI). La qualité globale des preuves a été évaluée en appliquant des critères de l'échelle GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

Au total, 28 essais totalisant 3 548 femmes ont été inclus dans cette revue. Les investigateurs comparaient des antioxydants oraux, notamment des combinaisons d'antioxydants, de pentoxifylline, de N-acétyl-cystéine, de mélatonine, de L-arginine, de vitamine E, de myo-inositol, de vitamine C, de vitamine D + calcium et d'acides gras oméga-3-polyinsaturés à un placebo, à l'absence de traitement/traitement standard ou à un autre antioxydant.

Les antioxydants n'étaient pas associés à une augmentation du taux de naissances vivantes comparés à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement/traitement standard (OR 1,25, IC à 95 % à 0,19 à 8,26, P = 0,82, 2 ECR, 97 femmes, I2 = 75 %, preuves de qualité très médiocre). Ce résultat suggère que chez les femmes hypofertiles dont le taux de naissances vivantes prévu est de 37 %, ce taux chez les femmes prenant des antioxydants serait compris entre 10 et 83 %.

Les antioxydants n'étaient pas associés à une augmentation du taux de grossesses cliniques comparés à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement/traitement standard (OR 1,30, IC à 95 % à 0,92 à 1,85, P = 0,14, 13 ECR, 2 441 femmes, I2 = 55 %, preuves de qualité très médiocre). Ce résultat suggère que chez les femmes hypofertiles dont le taux de grossesses cliniques prévu est de 23%, ce taux chez les femmes prenant des antioxydants serait compris entre 22 et 36 %.

Seul un essai rapportait des naissances vivantes dans la comparaison d'un antioxydant à un autre antioxydant et deux essais rapportaient des grossesses cliniques dans cette comparaison. Seuls les sous-totaux étaient utilisés dans cette analyse et aucune méta-analyse n'était possible car chaque essai utilisait un antioxydant différent.

La pentoxifylline était associée à une hausse du taux de grossesses cliniques comparée à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement (OR 2,03, IC à 95 % à 1,19 à 3,44, P = 0,009, 3 ECR, 276 femmes, I2 = 0 %).

Des événements indésirables étaient rapportés par 14 essais dans la méta-analyse et incluaient des fausses couches, des grossesses multiples, des grossesses ectopiques et des effets gastro-intestinaux. Aucune preuve n'a révélé de différences au niveau des effets indésirables entre les groupes prenant des antioxydants et les groupes témoins, mais ces données étaient limitées.

La qualité globale des preuves était « très médiocre » à « médiocre », en raison d'une mauvaise notification des résultats, du nombre réduit d'études incluses, des risques élevés de biais dans les études et d'une hétérogénéité dans l'analyse primaire.

Conclusions des auteurs

La qualité des preuves dans les comparaisons « antioxydant versus placebo/absence de traitement » et « antioxydant versus antioxydant » était évaluée comme étant « très médiocre ». Les antioxydants n'étaient pas associés à une augmentation du taux de naissances vivantes ou du taux de grossesses cliniques. Il y avait des preuves concernant un rapport entre la pentoxifylline et une augmentation du taux de grossesses cliniques. Toutefois, seuls trois essais étaient inclus dans cette comparaison. De futurs essais pourraient remettre en cause ce résultat. Les types d'antioxydants administrés variant, il était impossible d'évaluer si un antioxydant était plus efficace qu'un autre. Il semblerait qu'il n'existe aucune association entre les antioxydants et des effets indésirables chez les femmes, mais les données concernant ces résultats étaient limitées.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antioxydants dans l'hypofertilité chez la femme

Vitamines et minéraux dans l'hypofertilité chez la femme

Question de la revue : La supplémentation orale en antioxydants comparée à un placebo, à l'absence de traitement/traitement standard ou à un autre antioxydant améliore t-elle les résultats de la fécondité chez les femmes hypofertiles (un traitement standard contient < 1 mg d'acide folique).

Contexte : De nombreuses femmes hypofertiles suivant un traitement contre l'infertilité prennent également des suppléments alimentaires dans l'espoir d'améliorer leur fécondité. Cette période peut être particulièrement stressante pour ces femmes et leurs partenaires. Ces couples doivent impérativement disposer de preuves de bonne qualité pour pouvoir prendre des décisions éclairées, à savoir si, dans le cadre d'un traitement contre l'infertilité, la supplémentation en antioxydants améliore leurs chances ou génère des effets indésirables ; ces preuves sont déterminantes car la plupart des suppléments d'antioxydants ne font l'objet d'aucune réglementation. L'objectif de la présente revue était d'évaluer si la supplémentation orale en antioxydants permet à une femme hypofertile d'accroître ses chances de tomber enceinte et d'avoir un bébé.

Date des recherches : Les preuves sont à jour depuis avril 2013.

Caractéristiques des études : La revue incluait 28 essais contrôlés randomisés comparant des antioxydants à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement/traitement standard ou à un autre antioxydant chez un total de 3 548 femmes.

Sources de financement : Les sources de financement étaient rapportées par seulement six des 28 essais inclus.

Résultats principaux : Les antioxydants se sont révélés inefficaces dans l'augmentation des taux de naissances vivantes ou de grossesses cliniques. D'après ces résultats, nous pensions que sur 100 femmes hypofertiles ne prenant aucun antioxydant, 23 tomberaient enceintes par rapport à celles (entre 22 et 36 %) qui tomberaient enceintes si elles prenaient des antioxydants pour améliorer leurs chances de tomber enceintes. Les antioxydants ne semblaient pas être associés à des événements indésirables de fausse couche ou de grossesses multiples ou ectopiques.

Qualité des preuves : Les preuves de cette revue en termes de naissances vivantes, de grossesses cliniques et d'effets indésirables étaient de qualité « très médiocre » à « médiocre ».

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 24th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.