Intervention Review

Antenatal cardiotocography for fetal assessment

  1. Rosalie M Grivell1,*,
  2. Zarko Alfirevic2,
  3. Gillian ML Gyte3,
  4. Declan Devane4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 17 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007863.pub3


How to Cite

Grivell RM, Alfirevic Z, Gyte GML, Devane D. Antenatal cardiotocography for fetal assessment. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD007863. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007863.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Adelaide, Women's and Children's Hospital, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide, Australia

  2. 2

    The University of Liverpool, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

  3. 3

    The University of Liverpool, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

  4. 4

    National University of Ireland Galway, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Galway, Ireland

*Rosalie M Grivell, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Adelaide, Women's and Children's Hospital, 72 King William Road, Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia. rosalie.grivell@adelaide.edu.au. rmgrivell@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

Background

Cardiotocography (CTG) is a continuous recording of the fetal heart rate obtained via an ultrasound transducer placed on the mother’s abdomen. CTG is widely used in pregnancy as a method of assessing fetal well-being, predominantly in pregnancies with increased risk of complications.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of antenatal CTG (both traditional and computerised assessments) in improving outcomes for mothers and babies during and after pregnancy.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (9 July 2012) and reference lists of retrieved studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compared traditional antenatal CTG with no CTG or CTG results concealed; computerised CTG with no CTG or CTG results concealed; and computerised CTG with traditional CTG.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed eligibility, quality and extracted data.

Main results

Six studies (involving 2105 women) are included. Overall, the included studies were not of high quality, and only two had both adequate randomisation sequence generation and allocation concealment. All studies that were able to be included enrolled only women at increased risk of complications.

Comparison of traditional CTG versus no CTG showed no significant difference identified in perinatal mortality (risk ratio (RR) 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95 to 4.42, 2.3% versus 1.1%, four studies, N = 1627) or potentially preventable deaths (RR 2.46, 95% CI 0.96 to 6.30, four studies, N = 1627), though the meta-analysis was underpowered to assess this outcome. Similarly, there was no significant difference identified in caesarean sections (RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.28, 19.7% versus 18.5%, three trials, N = 1279) nor in the secondary outcomes that were assessed.

There were no eligible studies that compared computerised CTG with no CTG.

Comparison of computerised CTG versus traditional CTG showed a significant reduction in perinatal mortality with computerised CTG (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.88, two studies, 0.9% versus 4.2%, 469 women). However, there was no significant difference identified in potentially preventable deaths (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.04 to 1.29, two studies, N = 469), though the meta-analysis was underpowered to assess this outcome. There was no significant difference identified in caesarean sections (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.24, 63% versus 72%, one study, N = 59) or in secondary outcomes.

Authors' conclusions

There is no clear evidence that antenatal CTG improves perinatal outcome, but further studies focusing on the use of computerised CTG in specific populations of women with increased risk of complications are warranted.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

Cardiotocography (a form of electronic fetal monitoring) for assessing a baby's well-being in the womb during pregnancy

Some pregnancies can be complicated by a medical condition in the mother (e.g. diabetes or high blood pressure) or a condition that might affect the health or development of the baby. If these babies with potential difficulties could be identified, and if there were effective interventions to improve the outcomes, then an accurate test that could be used during pregnancy could be beneficial. Cardiotocography (CTG) is a continuous electronic record of the baby’s heart rate obtained via an ultrasound transducer placed on the mother’s abdomen. It is sometimes referred to as ‘electronic fetal monitoring’ (EFM). The review looked to see if using CTG during pregnancy might improve outcomes for babies by identifying those with complications. It looked for studies that included women at both increased risk, and at low risk, of complications. The review included six studies with all of the women at increased risk of complications. Four of the studies were undertaken in the 1980s and two in the late 1990s. There were no differences in outcomes identified, although when computerised interpretation of the CTG trace was used, the findings looked promising. However, CTG monitors, associated technologies and the way midwives and obstetricians care for women with different complications in pregnancy have changed over the years. This means that more studies are needed now to see if outcomes for babies at increased risk of complications can be improved with antenatal CTG, particularly computerised CTG.

 

アブストラクト

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

胎児評価のための出生前胎児心拍陣痛測定法

背景

胎児心拍陣痛測定法(CTG)は、母親の腹部上に超音波トランスデューサを設置して胎児心拍数を連続的に記録するものである。CTGは主に合併症リスクが増加する妊娠期に胎児の健康を評価する方法として広く用いられている。

目的

妊娠中および妊娠後の母親および子どものアウトカム改善における出生前CTG(従来の評価およびコンピュータ制御の評価)の有効性を評価する。

検索戦略

Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register(2012年7月9日)および検索した試験の文献リストを検索した。

選択基準

従来の出生前CTG結果とCTGなしまたはCTGを隠蔵化した結果との比較、コンピュータ制御のCTG結果とCTGなしまたはCTGを隠蔵化した結果との比較並びに、コンピュータ制御CTG結果と従来のCTG結果との比較を行うランダム化比較試験(RCT)および準RCT

データ収集と分析

2名のレビューアが別々に適格性、質を評価し、データを抽出した。

主な結果

6件の試験(女性2,105名を含む)を組み入れた。全体として、組み入れた試験は高品質ではなく、2件のみ適切なランダム化の手順に従い、割りつけの隠蔵化(コンシールメント)がなされていた。組み入れ可能だった全試験とも、合併症高リスクの女性のみ登録していた。<br /><br />メタアナリシスは当該アウトカムの評価には検出力不足であったが、従来のCTGとCTGなしの比較で周産期死亡率[リスク比(RR) 2.05、95%CI 0.95~4.42、2.3%対1.1%、4件の試験、N = 1,627]または予防可能な死亡例(RR 2.46、95%CI 0.96~6.30、4件の試験、N = 1,627)に有意差を認めなかった。同様に、帝王切開(RR 1.06、95%CI 0.88~1.28, 19.7%対18.5%、3件の試験、N = 1,279)または評価した副次アウトカムに有意差を認めなかった。<br /><br />コンピュータ制御CTGとCTGなしを比較した適格な試験は存在しなかった。<br /><br />コンピュータ制御CTGと従来のCTGとの比較では、コンピュータ制御CTGにより周産期死亡率の有意な低下を認めた(RR 0.20、95%CI 0.04~0.88、2件の試験、0.9%対4.2%、女性469名)。ただし、メタアナリシスは当該アウトカム評価に十分な検出力を有していなかったが、予防可能な死亡例(RR 0.23、95%CI 0.04~1.29、2件の試験、N = 469)に有意差を認めなかった。帝王切開(RR 0.87、95%CI 0.61~1.24、63%対72%、1件の試験、N = 59)または副次アウトカムに有意差を認めなかった。

著者の結論

出生前CTGが周産期アウトカムを改善するという明らかなエビデンスは得られなかったが、合併症高リスク女性からなる特定集団でのコンピュータ制御CTGの使用を主眼とする新たな試験実施が勧告されている。

 

平易な要約

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

妊娠中の子宮内胎児の健康を評価する胎児心拍陣痛測定法(電子胎児モニタリングの形態)

妊娠は時に、母親の医学的症状(糖尿病または高血圧)または胎児の健康または発達に影響する状況により複雑化する場合があります。問題が生じうる上記胎児を認めた場合、およびアウトカム改善に有効な介入手段がある場合、妊娠中に使用可能な正確な検査実施が有益な場合があります。胎児心拍陣痛測定法(CTG)は、母親の腹部上に設置した超音波トランスデューサ経由に行う胎児心拍数の継続的な電子記録です。「電子胎児モニタリング」と呼ばれることもあります(EFM)。本レビューでは、妊娠中のCTG使用により合併症を有する胎児を同定し、胎児のアウトカムが改善できるか否かを検討しました。合併症高リスクの女性および低リスクの女性を対象とする試験を検索しました。本レビューには全て合併症高リスク女性を対象とする6件の試験が含まれています。試験のうち4件は、1980年代に実施され、2件は1990年代後半に実施されました。コンピュータ制御によるCTG結果解釈を実施した所見は有望でしたが、認めたアウトカムに差は認められませんでした。しかし、CTGモニター、関連技術および、妊娠中に各種合併症を有する女性に対する助産師および産婦人科医の対応は、年とともに変化しています。すなわち、合併症リスク増加の胎児のアウトカムが出生前CTG、特にコンピュータ制御CTGにより改善可能であるか否かを検討するさらなる試験が必要ということになります。

訳注

監  訳: 江藤 宏美, 2014.3.14

実施組織: 厚生労働省委託事業によりMindsが実施した。

ご注意 : この日本語訳は、臨床医、疫学研究者などによる翻訳のチェックを受けて公開していますが、訳語の間違いなどお気づきの点がございましたら、Minds事務局までご連絡ください。Mindsでは最新版の日本語訳を掲載するよう努めておりますが、編集作業に伴うタイム・ラグが生じている場合もあります。ご利用に際しては、最新版(英語版)の内容をご確認ください。