Intervention Review

Email for clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals

  1. Helen Atherton1,*,
  2. Prescilla Sawmynaden2,
  3. Aziz Sheikh3,
  4. Azeem Majeed2,
  5. Josip Car4,5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group

Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007978.pub2


How to Cite

Atherton H, Sawmynaden P, Sheikh A, Majeed A, Car J. Email for clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD007978. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007978.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Oxford University, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford, UK

  2. 2

    Imperial College London, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, London, UK

  3. 3

    The University of Edinburgh, Centre for Population Health Sciences, Edinburgh, UK

  4. 4

    Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, London, UK

  5. 5

    University of Ljubljana, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ljubljana, Slovenia

*Helen Atherton, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford University, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG, UK. helen.atherton@phc.ox.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Email is a popular and commonly-used method of communication, but its use in health care is not routine. Where email communication has been demonstrated in health care this has included its use for communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals for clinical purposes, but the effects of using email in this way is not known.This review addresses the use of email for two-way clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Objectives

To assess the effects of healthcare professionals and patients using email to communicate with each other, on patient outcomes, health service performance, service efficiency and acceptability.

Search methods

We searched: the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1 2010), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1950 to January 2010), EMBASE (OvidSP) (1980 to January 2010), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1967 to January 2010), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1982 to February 2010) and ERIC (CSA) (1965 to January 2010). We searched grey literature: theses/dissertation repositories, trials registers and Google Scholar (searched July 2010). We used additional search methods: examining reference lists, contacting authors.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies examining interventions using email to allow patients to communicate clinical concerns to a healthcare professional and receive a reply, and taking the form of 1) unsecured email 2) secure email or 3) web messaging. All healthcare professionals, patients and caregivers in all settings were considered.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We assessed risk of bias according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. For continuous measures, we report effect sizes as mean differences (MD). For dichotomous outcome measures, we report effect sizes as odds ratios and rate ratios. Where it was not possible to calculate an effect estimate we report mean values for both intervention and control groups and the total number of participants in each group. Where data are available only as median values it is presented as such. It was not possible to carry out any meta-analysis of the data.

Main results

We included nine trials enrolling 1733 patients; all trials were judged to be at risk of bias. Seven were randomised controlled trials; two were cluster-randomised controlled designs. Eight examined email as compared to standard methods of communication. One compared email with telephone for the delivery of counselling. When email was compared to standard methods, for the majority of patient/caregiver outcomes it was not possible to adequately assess whether email had any effect. For health service use outcomes it was not possible to adequately assess whether email has any effect on resource use, but some results indicated that an email intervention leads to an increased number of emails and telephone calls being received by healthcare professionals. Three studies reported some type of adverse event but it was not clear if the adverse event had any impact on the health of the patient or the quality of health care. When email counselling was compared to telephone counselling only patient outcomes were measured, and for the majority of measures there was no difference between groups. Where there were differences these showed that telephone counselling leads to greater change in lifestyle modification factors than email counselling. There was one outcome relating to harm, which showed no difference between the email and the telephone counselling groups. There were no primary outcomes relating to healthcare professionals for either comparison.

Authors' conclusions

The evidence base was found to be limited with variable results and missing data, and therefore it was not possible to adequately assess the effect of email for clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals. Recommendations for clinical practice could not be made. Future research should ideally address the issue of missing data and methodological concerns by adhering to published reporting standards. The rapidly changing nature of technology should be taken into account when designing and conducting future studies and barriers to trial development and implementation should also be tackled. Potential outcomes of interest for future research include cost-effectiveness and health service resource use.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Using email for patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals to contact each other

Email is widely used in many sectors and lots of people use it in their day to day lives. The use of email in health care is not yet so common, although one use for it is for patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals to contact each other. This review examines how patients, healthcare professionals and health services may be affected by using email in this way. We looked for trials examining the use of email for patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals to contact each other and found nine trials with 1733 participants in total.

Eight of the trials looked at email compared with standard methods of communication. Where email was compared to standard methods of communication we found that we could not properly determine what effect email was having on patient/caregiver outcomes, as there were missing data and the results of the different studies varied. For health service use outcomes the situation was the same, but some results seemed to show that an email intervention may lead to an increased number of emails and telephone calls being received by healthcare professionals.

One of the trials looked at email counselling compared with telephone counselling. We found that it only looked at patient outcomes, and found few differences between groups. Where there were differences these showed that telephone counselling leads to greater changes in lifestyle than email counselling.

None of the trials measured how email affects healthcare professionals and only one measured whether email can cause harm. All of the trials were biased in some way and when we measured the quality of all of the results we found them to be of low or very low quality. As a result the results of this review should be viewed with caution.

The nature of the results means that we cannot make any recommendations for how email might best be used in clinical practice. Future research should make allowances for how quickly technology changes, and should consider how much email would cost to introduce and what effect it has on the use of healthcare resources. Research reports should be sure to clearly report their methods and findings, and researchers interested in carrying out research in this area should be assisted in developing ideas and put them into action.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Le courrier électronique pour la communication clinique entre patients/soignants et professionnels de la santé

Contexte

Le courrier électronique est un moyen de communication populaire et couramment utilisé, mais il ne s'est pas encore imposé dans la routine médicale. Lorsque la communication par courrier électronique a été utilisée dans le domaine médical cela incluait la communication entre patients/soignants et professionnels de la santé à des fins cliniques, mais les effets d'une telle utilisation du courrier électronique ne sont pas connus. Cette revue porte sur l'utilisation du courrier électronique pour la communication clinique bidirectionnelle entre patients/soignants et professionnels de la santé.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la communication par courrier électronique entre les professionnels de santé et les patients, sur les résultats relatifs aux patients, la performance des services de santé, et l'efficacité et l'acceptabilité des services.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans : le registre spécialisé du groupe thématique Cochrane sur les usagers de soins et la communication, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, numéro 1 2010), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (de 1950 à janvier 2010), EMBASE (OvidSP) (de 1980 à janvier 2010), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (de 1967 à janvier 2010), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (de 1982 à février 2010) et ERIC (CSA) (de 1965 à janvier 2010). Nous avons cherché dans la littérature grise : dépôts de thèses/mémoires, registres d'essais et Google Scholar (recherche effectuée en juillet 2010). Nous avons utilisé des méthodes de recherche supplémentaires : passage au crible de références bibliographiques, prise de contact avec des auteurs.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés, des essais quasi-randomisés, des études contrôlées avant-après et des études de séries temporelles interrompues portant sur des interventions utilisant le courrier électronique pour permettre aux patients de communiquer leurs préoccupations cliniques à un professionnel de la santé et de recevoir une réponse, sous la forme de 1) courrier électronique non sécurisé, 2) courrier électronique sécurisé ou 3) messagerie internet. Tous les types de personnels médicaux, de patients et de soignants ont été pris en considération, quelque soit le contexte.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de façon indépendante, évalué les risques de biais des études incluses et extrait les données. Nous avons contacté des auteurs d'études afin d'obtenir des informations complémentaires. Nous avons évalué les risques de biais en nous conformant au Manuel Cochrane pour les revues systématiques d'interventions. Pour les mesures continues, nous avons rendu compte de l'ampleur de l'effet sous la forme des différences moyennes (DM). Pour les mesures de résultat dichotomiques, nous avons rendu compte de l'ampleur de l'effet sous forme de rapports de cotes et de taux de proportion. Lorsqu'il n'était pas possible de calculer une estimation de l'effet nous avons rapporté les valeurs moyennes pour les groupes d'intervention et de contrôle, ainsi que le nombre total de participants dans chaque groupe. Lorsque les données n'étaient disponibles que sous forme de valeurs médianes elles sont présentées ainsi. Il n'a pas été possible de réaliser la moindre méta-analyse des données.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus neuf essais totalisant 1733 patients ; tous les essais ont été considérés comme présentant un risque de biais. Sept étaient des essais contrôlés randomisés ; deux étaient de type contrôlé, randomisé en grappes. Huit avaient comparé le courrier électronique aux méthodes standard de communication. Un avait comparé le counseling par courrier électronique à celui par téléphone. Quand le courrier électronique avait été comparé à des méthodes standard, il n'a pas été possible, pour la majorité des critères de résultat relatifs aux patients/soignants, d'évaluer si le courrier électronique avait eu le moindre effet. Pour les critères de résultat relatifs à l'utilisation des services de santé, il n'a pas été possible d'évaluer si le courrier électronique avait eu le moindre effet sur l'utilisation des ressources mais certains résultats indiquaient que l'utilisation du courrier électronique conduit à une augmentation du nombre de courriels et d'appels téléphoniques reçus par les professionnels de la santé. Trois études avaient rendu compte d'un événement indésirable, mais il n'était pas clair si l'événement indésirable avait eu un impact sur la santé du patient ou sur la qualité des soins médicaux. Lorsque le counseling par courrier électronique avait été comparé au counseling téléphonique, seuls les résultats relatifs aux patients avaient été mesurés, et pour la majorité des mesures il n'y avait aucune différence entre les groupes. Lorsqu'il y avait des différences, elles montraient que le counseling téléphonique conduit à de plus grands changements dans les facteurs de modification du mode de vie que le counseling par courrier électronique. Il y avait un critère de résultat relatif aux inconvénients, qui ne montrait aucune différence entre les groupes de counseling par courrier électronique et par téléphone. Aucune comparaison ne portait sur un critère de résultat essentiel relatif aux professionnels de la santé.

Conclusions des auteurs

La base de données factuelles s'est avérée limitée (résultats variables et données manquantes) et il n'a donc pas été possible d'évaluer correctement l'effet du courrier électronique pour la communication clinique entre les patients/soignants et les professionnels de la santé. Il n'a pas été possible de formuler de recommandations pour la pratique clinique. Les recherches futures devraient idéalement examiner la question des données manquantes et des problèmes méthodologiques en adhérant aux standards de notification publiés. L'évolution rapide de la technologie devra être prise en compte lors de la conception et de la réalisation d'études futures et il conviendra également d'aborder les obstacles au développement et à la mise en œuvre d'essais. Les critères de résultat potentiellement intéressants pour les recherches futures sont notamment le rapport coût-efficacité et l'utilisation des ressources des services médicaux.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Le courrier électronique pour la communication clinique entre patients/soignants et professionnels de la santé

L'utilisation du courrier électronique pour les contacts entre patients/soignants et professionnels de la santé

Le courrier électronique est couramment utilisé dans de nombreux secteurs et beaucoup de gens l'utilisent dans leur vie quotidienne. L'utilisation du courrier électronique dans les soins de santé n'est pas encore très courante, bien qu'une de ses utilisations soit la communication entre patients/soignants et professionnels de la santé. Cette revue examine la façon dont les patients, les professionnels de la santé et des services de santé peuvent être affectés par une telle utilisation du courrier électronique. Nous avons cherché des essais portant sur l'utilisation du courrier électronique pour les contacts entre patients/soignants et professionnels de la santé et nous avons trouvé neuf essais totalisant 1733 participants.

Huit essais avaient comparé le courrier électronique aux méthodes standard de communication. Lorsque le courrier électronique était comparé aux méthodes standard de communication nous avons constaté que nous ne pouvions pas déterminer correctement l'effet du courrier électronique sur les critères de résultat relatifs aux patients/soignants, parce que certaines données manquaient et que les résultats des différentes études variaient. La situation était la même pour les critères de résultat relatifs à l'utilisation des services de santé, mais certains résultats semblaient montrer que l'utilisation du courrier électronique pourrait conduire à une augmentation du nombre de courriels et d'appels téléphoniques reçus par les professionnels de la santé.

Un des essais avait comparé le counseling par courrier électronique à celui par téléphone. Nous avons constaté qu'il ne s'était intéressé qu'à des résultats relatifs aux patients et avait trouvé peu de différences entre les groupes. Lorsqu'il y avait des différences, elles montraient que le counseling téléphonique conduit à de plus grands modifications du mode de vie que le counseling par courrier électronique.

Aucun des essais n'avait mesuré comment le courrier électronique affecte les professionnels de la santé et un seul avait mesuré les éventuels dommages causés par le courrier électronique. Tous les essais étaient biaisés d'une certaine façon et lorsque nous avons mesuré la qualité de l'ensemble des résultats nous les avons trouvés de qualité faible ou très faible. En conséquence, les résultats de cette revue devraient être considérés avec prudence.

La nature des résultats signifie que nous ne pouvons pas faire de recommandations sur la meilleure façon d'utiliser le courrier électronique dans la pratique clinique. Les recherches futures devraient prendre en compte la rapidité des évolutions technologiques et s'intéresser au coût d'introduction du courrier électronique et à son impact sur l'utilisation des ressources médicales. Il faudra veiller à ce que les rapports de recherche rendent bien compte de leurs méthodes et de leurs conclusions, et les chercheurs intéressés à travailler dans ce domaine devraient être aidés à développer des idées et à les mettre en œuvre.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�