Intervention Review

Antidepressants for the treatment of abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in children and adolescents

  1. Angela Kaminski1,*,
  2. Adrian Kamper2,
  3. Kylie Thaler1,
  4. Andrea Chapman1,
  5. Gerald Gartlehner1,3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Group

Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 30 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008013.pub2


How to Cite

Kaminski A, Kamper A, Thaler K, Chapman A, Gartlehner G. Antidepressants for the treatment of abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD008013. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008013.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Danube University Krems, Department for Evidence-based Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Krems, Austria

  2. 2

    Children's Hospital of Salzburg, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine for Children and Adolescents, Salzburg, Austria

  3. 3

    RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

*Angela Kaminski, Department for Evidence-based Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Danube University Krems, Dr.-Karl-Dorrek-Strasse 30, Krems, 3500, Austria. angela.kaminski@donau-uni.ac.at.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are among the most common medical problems in paediatric medicine. Frequently, physicians prescribe antidepressants as a second-line treatment for children and adolescents with FGIDs. To date, the evidence on the benefits and harms of antidepressants for the treatment of abdominal pain-related FGIDs has not been assessed systematically.

Objectives

The primary objectives were to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for the treatment of abdominal pain-related FGIDs in children and adolescents.

Search methods

We searched The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, IPA, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Biosis Previews and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the World Health Organization with appropriate filters (from inception to January 31, 2011).

Selection criteria

For efficacy we included double-blind, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of antidepressants for treatment of abdominal pain-related FGIDs in children and adolescents 18 years or younger. Open-label and uncontrolled experimental studies, as well as observational studies were eligible for the assessment of harms. The minimum study duration was 4 weeks. The minimum study size was 30 participants.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed all abstracts and full text articles, and rated the risk of bias for included studies. Data were extracted independently by one author and checked for accuracy by another author. Data were analysed using RevMan 5.

Main results

Two RCTs (123 participants), both using amitriptyline, met the pre-specified inclusion criteria. These studies provided mixed findings on the efficacy of amitriptyline for the treatment of abdominal pain-related FGIDs. The larger, publicly-funded study reported no statistically significant difference in efficacy between amitriptyline and placebo in 90 children and adolescents with FGIDs after 4 weeks of treatment. On intention-to-treat (ITT)- analysis, 59% of the children reported feeling better in the amitriptyline group compared with 53% in the placebo group (RR 1.12; 95% CI: 0.77 to 1.63; P = 0.54). The risk of bias for this study was rated as low.

The second RCT enrolled 33 adolescents with irritable bowel syndrome. Patients receiving amitriptyline experienced greater improvements in the primary outcome, overall quality of life, at weeks 6, 10, and 13 compared with those on placebo (P= 0.019, 0.004, and 0.013, respectively). No effect estimates were calculated for the quality of life outcome because mean quality of life scores and standard deviations were not reported. For most secondary outcomes no statistically significant differences between amitriptyline and placebo could be detected. The risk of bias for this study was rated as unclear for most items. However, it was rated as high for other bias due to multiple testing. The results of this study should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of patients and multiple testing.

The larger study reported mild adverse events including fatigue, rash and headache and dizziness. On ITT analysis, 4% of the amitriptyline group experienced at least one adverse event compared to 2% of the placebo group. There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients who experienced at least one adverse event (RR 1.91; 95% CI 0.18 to 20.35; P = 0.59). The smaller study reported no adverse events. The methods of adverse effects assessment was poorly reported in both studies and no clear conclusions on the risks of harms of amitriptyline can be drawn.

Authors' conclusions

Clinicians must be aware that for the majority of antidepressant medications no evidence exists that supports their use for the treatment of abdominal pain-related FGIDs in children and adolescents. The existing randomised controlled evidence is limited to studies on amitriptyline and revealed no statistically significant differences between amitriptyline and placebo for most efficacy outcomes. Amitriptyline does not appear to provide any benefit for the treatment of FGIDs in children and adolescents. Studies in children with depressive disorders have shown that antidepressants can lead to substantial, sometimes life-threatening adverse effects. Until better evidence evolves, clinicians should weigh the potential benefits of antidepressant treatment against known risks of antidepressants in paediatric patients.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antidepressants for the treatment of children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain

Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common in childhood and adolescence. In most cases no medical reason for the pain can be found. Various drug treatment approaches for the different types of abdominal pain-related FGIDs exist. These drug treatments include: prokinetics and antisecretory agents for functional dyspepsia; pizotifen, propranolol, cyproheptadine or sumatriptane for abdominal migraine; and antispasmodic and antidiarrhoeal regimen for irritable bowel syndrome. Antidepressants have been shown to be effective in some studies of adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders. As a result young patients with similar complaints are sometimes treated with antidepressants. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence assessing the advantages and disadvantages of such an approach. Only two studies met the inclusion criteria. Both of these studies were randomised controlled trials and assessed the effectiveness and safety of amitriptyline in children with FGIDs. Amitriptyline is a first generation antidepressant (tricyclic antidepressant). Amitriptyline is no longer an agent of first choice for the treatment of depressive disorders because of potentially serious side effects including overdose. Amitriptyline has not been approved for the treatment of functional abdominal pain in children or adolescents.

The larger study (n = 90) showed no difference in the proportion of patients feeling better between the treatment - and the placebo (sugar pill) groups. Side effects were mild and included fatigue, rash and headache and dizziness.The authors of the other, much smaller study (n = 33) reported a significant improvement in overall quality of life and a reduction in pain for specific areas of the abdomen and certain follow up times. However, the results of this study should be interpreted with caution due to poor methodological quality and the small number of patients enrolled. Amitriptyline does not appear to provide any benefit for the treatment of FGIDs in children and adolescents. At present, the evidence for the treatment of children and adolescents with abdominal pain-related diseases with antidepressants does not support the use of antidepressant agents in this group of patients. We suggest considering alternative treatments that are supported by stronger evidence. There is need for larger, well-conducted trials with adequate patient relevant outcomes such as quality of life and pain relief to provide more information regarding this common condition.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Antidepresivos para el tratamiento de los trastornos gastrointestinales funcionales asociados a dolor abdominal en niños y adolescentes

Los trastornos gastrointestinales funcionales (TGIF) asociados a dolor abdominal se encuentran entre los problemas médicos más frecuentes en la medicina pediátrica. Con frecuencia, los médicos prescriben antidepresivos como un tratamiento de segunda línea para los niños y adolescentes con TGIF. Hasta la fecha, las pruebas sobre los efectos beneficiosos y perjudiciales de los antidepresivos para el tratamiento de los TGIF asociados a dolor abdominal no se han evaluado de forma sistemática.

Objetivos

El objetivo primario fue realizar una revisión sistemática para evaluar la eficacia y la seguridad de los antidepresivos para el tratamiento de los TGIF asociados a dolor abdominal en niños y adolescentes.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se realizaron búsquedas en The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, IPA, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Biosis Previews, y los International Clinical Trials Registry Platform de la Organización Mundial de la Salud con filtros apropiados (desde su inicio hasta el 31 de enero de 2011).

Criterios de selección

Para la eficacia se incluyeron ensayos controlados aleatorios (ECA) doble ciego de antidepresivos para el tratamiento de los TGIF asociados a dolor abdominal en niños y adolescentes de 18 años de edad o menos. Los estudios experimentales abiertos y no controlados, así como los estudios observacionales, fueron elegibles para la evaluación de los efectos perjudiciales. La duración mínima del estudio fue de cuatro semanas. El tamaño mínimo del estudio fue de 30 participantes.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos revisores evaluaron de forma independiente todos los resúmenes y los textos completos de los artículos y calificaron el riesgo de sesgo de los estudios incluidos. Un revisor extrajo los datos de forma independiente y otro revisor verificó su exactitud. Los datos fueron analizados mediante el programa RevMan 5.

Resultados principales

Dos ECA (123 pacientes) que utilizaron amitriptilina cumplieron los criterios de inclusión preestablecidos. Estos estudios proporcionaron hallazgos mixtos sobre la eficacia de la amitriptilina para el tratamiento de los TGIF asociados a dolor abdominal. El estudio más grande, financiado públicamente, no informó diferencias estadísticamente significativas en la eficacia entre amitriptilina y placebo en 90 niños y adolescentes con TGIF después de cuatro semanas de tratamiento. En un análisis de intención de tratar, el 59% de los niños del grupo de amitriptilina informó que se sintió mejor en comparación con el 53% del grupo placebo (RR 1,12; IC del 95%: 0,77 a 1,63; P = 0,54). El riesgo de sesgo de este estudio se calificó como bajo.

El segundo ECA incluyó 33 adolescentes con síndrome de colon irritable. Los pacientes que recibieron amitriptilina presentaron una mejoría más marcada en el resultado primario calidad de vida general a las semanas seis, diez y 13 en comparación con los pacientes del grupo placebo (p = 0,019; 0,004 y 0,013 respectivamente). No se calculó una estimación del efecto para el resultado calidad de vida porque no se informaron las puntuaciones medias de la calidad de vida ni las desviaciones estándar. En la mayoría de los resultados secundarios no se detectaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre amitriptilina y placebo. El riesgo de sesgo de este estudio se calificó como incierto para la mayoría de los ítems. Sin embargo, se calificó como alto para otros sesgos debido a pruebas múltiples. Los resultados de este estudio se deben interpretar con precaución debido al escaso número de pacientes y a las pruebas múltiples.

El estudio más grande informó eventos adversos leves que incluyeron fatiga, erupción cutánea, cefalea y mareo. En el análisis de intención de tratar, el 4% de los pacientes del grupo de amitriptilina presentó al menos un evento adverso en comparación con el 2% del grupo placebo. No hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas en la proporción de pacientes que presentó al menos un evento adverso (RR 1,91; IC del 95%: 0,18 a 20,35; P = 0,59). El estudio más pequeño no informó eventos adversos. Los métodos de evaluación de los efectos adversos se informaron de forma deficiente en ambos estudios y no se pueden establecer conclusiones claras sobre los riesgos de los efectos perjudiciales de la amitriptilina.

Conclusiones de los autores

Los médicos deben estar conscientes de que no existen pruebas que apoyen el uso de la mayoría de los fármacos antidepresivos en el tratamiento de los TGIF asociados a dolor abdominal en niños y adolescentes. Las pruebas controladas aleatorias existentes se limitan a estudios sobre la amitriptilina y no mostraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre la amitriptilina y placebo para la mayoría de los resultados de eficacia. La amitriptilina parece no proporcionar efectos beneficiosos para el tratamiento de los TGIF en niños y adolescentes. Los estudios en los niños con trastornos depresivos mostraron que los antidepresivos pueden dar lugar a efectos adversos significativos y en ocasiones potencialmente mortales. Hasta que existan mejores pruebas, los médicos deben evaluar los efectos beneficiosos potenciales del tratamiento antidepresivo contra los riesgos conocidos de los antidepresivos en los pacientes pediátricos.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antidépresseurs pour le traitement des troubles fonctionnels gastro-intestinaux associés à des douleurs abdominales chez l'enfant et l'adolescent

Contexte

Les troubles fonctionnels gastro-intestinaux (TFGI) associés à des douleurs abdominales constituent l'un des problèmes médicaux les plus courants en médecine pédiatrique. Les médecins prescrivent souvent des antidépresseurs en traitement de deuxième intention chez les enfants et adolescents atteints de TFGI. À ce jour, les preuves relatives aux effets bénéfiques et délétères des antidépresseurs dans le traitement des TFGI associés à des douleurs abdominales n'ont pas été évaluées de manière systématique.

Objectifs

Le principal objectif de cette revue systématique était d'évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité des antidépresseurs dans le traitement des TFGI associés à des douleurs abdominales chez les enfants et adolescents.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté la Bibliothèque Cochrane, PubMed, EMBASE, IPA, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Biosis Previews et le système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé en utilisant des filtres appropriés (depuis leur création jusqu'au 31 janvier 2011).

Critères de sélection

Pour l'évaluation de l'efficacité, nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) en double aveugle examinant des antidépresseurs dans le traitement des TFGI associés à des douleurs abdominales chez les enfants et adolescents jusqu'à 18 ans. Les études expérimentales ouvertes et non contrôlées ainsi que les études observationnelles étaient éligibles pour l'évaluation des effets délétères. La durée minimum des études était de 4 semaines. L'effectif minimum des études était de 30 participants.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué tous les résumés et articles complets, et évalué le risque de biais des études incluses de manière indépendante. Les données ont été extraites de manière indépendante par un auteur, et un autre auteur a vérifié leur exactitude. Les données ont été analysées à l'aide de RevMan 5.

Résultats Principaux

Deux ECR (123 participants), qui utilisaient tous deux de l'amitriptyline, remplissaient les critères d'inclusion prédéfinis. Ces études rapportaient des résultats mitigés concernant l'efficacité de l'amitriptyline dans le traitement des TFGI associés à des douleurs abdominales. L'étude à plus grande échelle, financée par des fonds publics, ne rapportait aucune différence statistiquement significative entre l'amitriptyline et le placebo en termes d'efficacité chez 90 enfants et adolescents atteints de TFGI au bout de 4 semaines de traitement. Dans l'analyse en intention de traiter (ITT), 59 % des enfants du groupe de l'amitriptyline indiquaient se sentir mieux, contre 53 % dans le groupe du placebo (RR de 1,12 ; IC à 95 % : entre 0,77 et 1,63 ; P = 0,54). Le risque de biais de cette étude était faible.

Le deuxième ECR recrutait 33 adolescents atteints de syndrome du côlon irritable. Les patients recevant de l'amitriptyline présentaient une amélioration supérieure du critère de jugement principal, la qualité de vie globale, à 6, 10 et 13 semaines par rapport aux patients recevant un placebo (P = 0,019, 0,004 et 0,013, respectivement). Aucune estimation de l'effet n'a été calculée pour le critère de jugement de la qualité de vie car les scores moyens et les écarts types n'étaient pas rapportés. Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'était détectée entre l'amitriptyline et le placebo concernant la plupart des critères de jugement secondaires. Cette étude présentait un risque de biais incertain pour la plupart des critères. Néanmoins, le risque d'autres biais était élevé en raison de l'utilisation de comparaisons multiples. Les résultats de cette étude devraient être interprétés avec précaution en raison de son effectif réduit et de l'utilisation de comparaisons multiples.

L'étude à plus grande échelle rapportait des événements indésirables légers tels que de la fatigue, des éruptions cutanées, des céphalées et des étourdissements. Dans l'analyse ITT, 4 % des patients du groupe de l'amitriptyline présentaient au moins un événement indésirable, contre 2 % dans le groupe du placebo. Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'était observée en termes de nombre de patients présentant au moins un événement indésirable (RR de 1,91 ; IC à 95 %, entre 0,18 et 20,35 ; P = 0,59). L'étude la plus petite ne rapportait aucun événement indésirable. Les méthodes d'évaluation des effets indésirables étaient mal documentées dans les deux études, et aucune conclusion définitive ne peut être présentée concernant les risques d'effets délétères associés à l'amitriptyline.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les cliniciens doivent être conscients du fait qu'aucune preuve ne vient étayer l'efficacité de la majorité des antidépresseurs dans le traitement des TFGI associés à des douleurs abdominales chez les enfants et adolescents. Les preuves issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés sont circonscrites aux études examinant de l'amitriptyline, qui ne révèlent aucune différence statistiquement significative entre l'amitriptyline et le placebo pour la plupart des critères de jugement de l'efficacité. L'amitriptyline ne semble pas conférer de bénéfice dans le traitement des TFGI chez les enfants et adolescents. Des études examinant des enfants atteints de troubles dépressifs ont montré que les antidépresseurs pouvaient entraîner des effets indésirables substantiels engageant parfois le pronostic vital du patient. En l'attente de preuves de meilleure qualité, les cliniciens devraient soupeser les bénéfices potentiels et les risques connus des antidépresseurs chez les patients pédiatriques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antidépresseurs pour le traitement des troubles fonctionnels gastro-intestinaux associés à des douleurs abdominales chez l'enfant et l'adolescent

Antidépresseurs pour le traitement des douleurs abdominales fonctionnelles chez les enfants et les adolescents

Les troubles fonctionnels gastro-intestinaux (TFGI) associés à des douleurs abdominales sont courants chez les enfants et adolescents. Dans la plupart des cas, ces douleurs n'ont aucune explication médicale. Différentes approches pharmacologiques sont utilisées pour les différents types de TFGI associés à des douleurs abdominales. Ces traitements médicamenteux incluent : des prokinétiques et des agents antisécrétoires pour la dyspepsie fonctionnelle ; du pizotifène, du propranolol, de la cyproheptadine ou du sumatriptan pour la migraine abdominale ; et un schéma antispasmodique et antidiarrhéique pour le syndrome du côlon irritable. Les antidépresseurs se sont avérés efficaces dans certaines études portant sur des adultes atteints de troubles fonctionnels gastro-intestinaux. Par conséquent, des antidépresseurs sont parfois prescrits aux jeunes patients présentant des troubles de même nature. L'objectif de cette revue était d'examiner les preuves disponibles concernant les avantages et les inconvénients de cette approche. Seules deux études remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Ces deux études étaient des essais contrôlés randomisés examinant l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'amitriptyline chez des enfants atteints de TFGI. L'amitriptyline est un antidépresseur de première génération (antidépresseur tricyclique). L'amitriptyline n'est plus considérée comme un agent de premier choix dans le traitement des troubles dépressifs en raison de ses effets secondaires potentiellement graves, notamment une surdose. L'amitriptyline n'a pas été homologuée dans le traitement des douleurs abdominales fonctionnelles chez les enfants ou les adolescents.

L'étude à plus grande échelle (n = 90) ne rapportait aucune différence entre le groupe expérimental et celui du placebo (pilule de sucre) en termes de nombre de patients ressentant une amélioration. Les effets secondaires étaient légers et incluaient de la fatigue, des éruptions cutanées, des céphalées et des étourdissements. Les auteurs de l'autre étude, beaucoup plus petite (n = 33), rapportaient une amélioration significative en termes de qualité de vie globale et une réduction des douleurs dans certaines régions spécifiques de l'abdomen et à certains points-temps. Néanmoins, les résultats de cette étude devraient être interprétés avec précaution en raison de sa faible qualité méthodologique et du nombre limité de patients recrutés. L'amitriptyline ne semble pas conférer de bénéfice dans le traitement des TFGI chez les enfants et adolescents. À l'heure actuelle, les preuves d'efficacité des antidépresseurs dans le traitement des enfants et adolescents atteints de maladies associées à des douleurs abdominales ne permettent pas de recommander l'utilisation de ces agents chez ce groupe de patients. Nous suggérons de recourir à des traitements alternatifs présentant une efficacité mieux démontrée. Des essais à plus grande échelle bien réalisés et examinant des critères de jugement importants pour les patients, tels que la qualité de vie et le soulagement de la douleur, sont nécessaires afin d'obtenir davantage d'informations concernant cette affection courante.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.