Intervention Review

Interventions for erosive lichen planus affecting mucosal sites

  1. Suzanne Cheng1,
  2. Gudula Kirtschig2,
  3. Susan Cooper3,
  4. Martin Thornhill4,
  5. Jo Leonardi-Bee5,
  6. Ruth Murphy1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Skin Group

Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 JUN 2009

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008092.pub2


How to Cite

Cheng S, Kirtschig G, Cooper S, Thornhill M, Leonardi-Bee J, Murphy R. Interventions for erosive lichen planus affecting mucosal sites. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD008092. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008092.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Queen's Medical Centre, Department of Dermatology, Nottingham, UK

  2. 2

    VU University Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  3. 3

    Churchill Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Oxford, UK

  4. 4

    University of Sheffield School of Clinical Dentistry, Clinical Academic Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Surgery, Sheffield, UK

  5. 5

    The University of Nottingham, Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, Nottingham, UK

*Ruth Murphy, Department of Dermatology, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK. ruthmurphy1@aol.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Erosive lichen planus (ELP) affecting mucosal surfaces is a chronic autoimmune disease of unknown aetiology. It is often more painful and debilitating than the non-erosive types of lichen planus. Treatment of erosive lichen planus is difficult and aimed at palliation rather than cure. Several topical and systemic agents have been used with varying results. Another Cochrane review has already assessed interventions for lichen planus affecting the mouth.

Objectives

To assess the effects of interventions in the treatment of erosive lichen planus affecting the oral, anogenital, and oesophageal regions.

Search methods

We searched the following databases up to September 2009: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2007), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched reference lists of articles and online trials registries for ongoing trials.

Selection criteria

We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effectiveness of any topical or systemic interventions for ELP affecting either the mouth, genital region, or both areas, in participants of any age, gender, or race.

Data collection and analysis

The primary outcome measures were as follows:

(a) Pain reduction using a visual analogue scale rated by participants;
(b) Physician Global Assessment; and
(c) Participant global self-assessment.

Changes in scores at the end of therapy compared with baseline were analysed.

Main results

Fifteen RCTs were included, giving a total of 473 participants with ELP (study sizes ranged between 8-94). All studies involved oral sites only. Six studies included participants with non-erosive lichen planus but only the erosive subgroup was included for intended subgroup analysis. We were unable to pool data from any of the nine studies with only ELP participants or any of the six studies with the ELP subgroup, due to small numbers and the heterogeneity of the interventions, design methods, and outcome variables between studies.

One study involving 50 participants found that 0.025% clobetasol propionate administered as liquid microspheres significantly reduced pain compared to ointment (Mean difference (MD) -18.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) -28.57 to -8.03), but outcome data was only available in 45 participants (high risk of performance bias for blinding of participants, low/unclear risk of bias overall). However, in another study, a significant difference in pain was seen in the small subgroup of 11 ELP participants, favouring ciclosporin solution over 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide in orabase (MD -1.40, 95% CI -1.86 to -0.94) (high risk of performance and detection bias due to likely lack of blinding, low/unclear risk of bias overall). Aloe vera gel was 6 times more likely to result in at least a 50% improvement in pain symptoms compared to placebo in a study involving 45 ELP participants (Risk ratio (RR) 6.16, 95% CI 2.35 to 16.13) (low risk of bias overall). No significant difference was seen in Physician Global Assessment in these three studies.

In a small single study involving 20 ELP participants, 1% pimecrolimus cream was 7 times more likely to result in a strong improvement as rated by the Physician Global Assessment when compared to vehicle cream (RR 7.00, 95% CI 1.04 to 46.95) (low risk of bias overall). In a study involving a small subgroup of 8 ELP participants, a significant difference was seen for an improvement in the severity of the disease as rated by the Physician Global Assessment, in favour of the ciclosporin group when compared to the vehicle (MD -1.40, 95% CI -1.86 to -0.94) (unclear risk of selection bias for allocation concealment, overall risk of bias low).

No statistically significant benefits were shown for topical tacrolimus or fluticasone spray in two separate studies of 29 and 44 participants respectively.

There is no overwhelming evidence for the efficacy of a single treatment, including topical steroids, which are the widely accepted first-line therapy for ELP. Several side-effects were reported, but none were serious. With topical corticosteroids, the main side-effects were oral candidiasis and dyspepsia.

Authors' conclusions

This review suggests that there is only weak evidence for the effectiveness of any of the treatments for oral ELP, whilst no evidence was found for genital ELP. More RCTs on a larger scale are needed in the oral and genital ELP populations. We suggest that future studies should have standardised outcome variables that are clinically important to affected individuals. We recommend the measurement of a clinical severity score and a participant-rated symptom score using agreed and validated severity scoring tools. We also recommend the development of a validated combined severity scoring tool for both oral and genital populations.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Treatments for erosive lichen planus affecting mucosal sites

Erosive lichen planus (ELP) is a condition that affects the mouth, oesophagus (food pipe or gullet), and anogenital region. It is caused by an over-active immune system. It is often more painful and debilitating than the non-erosive types of lichen planus. Depending on the site involved, affected individuals may experience pain, and difficulty eating; passing urine; or having sexual intercourse. Treatment is difficult and aimed at controlling symptoms, rather than cure. Several creams and tablets have been used with varying results.

This review looked at the effectiveness of treatments for ELP and included 15 studies, with 473 participants with ELP. All involved oral, but not genital, disease. Many studies were excluded either because they were not randomised controlled trials (where participants are divided into two groups at random) or because they recruited participants with all types of lichen planus, rather than just the erosive subtypes. All of these studies recruited small numbers of participants (12 to 94) and used a variety of different assessment methods and timings; hence, it was not possible to combine or compare results between studies directly.

We found only weak evidence for the effectiveness of any of the treatments for oral ELP. None of the studies involved genital or oesophageal disease; hence, no evidence was found for the treatment of these conditions. One small study found that 0.025% clobetasol propionate (a very potent topical steroid) administered as a spray significantly reduced pain when compared to ointment. In another study, a significant difference in pain was seen in the small subgroup of 11 ELP participants, favouring ciclosporin solution over 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide in orabase (a potent topical steroid). In a study involving 45 ELP participants, aloe vera gel was 6 times more likely to result in at least a 50% improvement in pain symptoms compared to placebo. In a study involving a small subgroup of 8 ELP participants, a significant difference was seen for an improvement in the severity of the disease in favour of the ciclosporin group when compared to the vehicle.

Several side-effects were reported, but none were serious. With topical corticosteroids, the main side-effects were oral candida (yeast) infection and pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen. Temporary burning was a common side-effect reported with tacrolimus 0.1% ointment and pimecrolimus 0.1% cream.

Overall, there was no overwhelming evidence for the effectiveness of any single treatment, including topical steroids, which are the widely accepted first-line therapy for ELP. This was mainly due to the lack of good-quality, well-conducted trials and small participant numbers. Another Cochrane review has already assessed interventions for lichen planus affecting the mouth.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour le lichen plan érosif affectant les muqueuses

Contexte

Le lichen plan érosif (LPE) affectant les muqueuses est une maladie auto-immune chronique d'étiologie inconnue. Il est souvent plus douloureux et invalidant que les formes non-érosives de lichen plan. Le traitement est difficile et à visée palliative plutôt que curative. Plusieurs agents topiques et systémiques sont utilisés, avec des résultats variables.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de traitements du lichen plan érosif affectant les régions buccale, ano-génitale et œsophagienne.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons cherché dans les bases de données suivantes jusqu'à septembre 2009 : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur la peau, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (à partir de 2005), EMBASE (à partir de 2007) et LILACS (à partir de 1982). Nous avons également passé en revue des bibliographies d'articles, ainsi que des registres d'essais en ligne dans le but de trouver des essais en cours.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons pris en considération tout essai contrôlé randomisé (ECR) ayant évalué l'efficacité d'une quelconque intervention topique ou systémique pour le LPE affectant soit la bouche, soit la région génitale, soit les deux zones, chez des participants de tout âge, sexe ou race.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les principaux critères de résultat étaient les suivants :

(a) La diminution de la douleur, exprimée par les participants sur une échelle visuelle analogique ;
(b) L'évaluation globale du médecin ; et
(c) L'auto-évaluation globale effectuée par le participant.

À la fin du traitement, les variations des scores par rapport aux valeurs initiales ont été analysées.

Résultats Principaux

Quinze ECR en tout ont été identifiés, soit un total de 473 participants atteints de LPE. Les études portaient toutes exclusivement sur le LPE buccal. Six des 15 études incluaient des participants atteints de lichen plan non érosif. Pour ces études, seul le sous-groupe érosif a été inclus dans l'analyse par sous-groupe prévue. Nous n'avons pas pu regrouper de données provenant d'aucune des neuf études portant exclusivement sur des personnes atteintes de LPE ou des six études incluant un sous-groupe de LPE, en raison des petits effectifs et de l'hétérogénéité des interventions, méthodes de conception et critères de résultat mesurés. Une petite étude portant sur 50 participants a constaté que le propionate de clobétasol à 0,025 % administré sous forme de microsphères liquides réduisait significativement la douleur en comparaison avec la pommade (différence moyenne (DM) -18,30 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % -28,57 à -8,03), mais les données des résultats n'étaient disponibles que pour 45 participants. Cependant, dans une autre étude, une différence significative au niveau de la douleur avait été observée dans le petit sous-groupe de 11 participants atteints de LPE, donnant un avantage à la solution de ciclosporine par rapport à l'acétonide de triamcinolone 0,1 % dans de l'Orabase (DM -1,40 ; IC à 95 % -1,86 à -0,94). Dans une étude impliquant 45 participants atteints de LPE, le gel d'aloe vera était six fois plus susceptible d'aboutir à un allégement d'au moins 50 % des symptômes de douleur, en comparaison avec le placebo (Rapport de risque (RR ) 6,16 ; IC à 95 % 2,35 à 16,13). Dans une étude portant sur 20 participants atteints de LPE, la crème de pimecrolimus à 1% était 7 fois plus susceptible d'aboutir à une forte amélioration, selon le critère d'évaluation globale du médecin, que la crème excipient (RR 7,00, IC à 95 % de 1,04 à 46,95).

Il n'y a pas de preuves irréfutables de l'efficacité d'un quelconque des traitements généralement utilisés comme traitement de première intention pour le LPE, stéroïdes topiques compris. Plusieurs effets secondaires ont été signalés, mais aucun n'était grave. Avec les corticostéroïdes topiques, les principaux effets secondaires étaient la candidose buccale et la dyspepsie.

Conclusions des auteurs

Cette revue suggère qu'il n'y a que de faibles preuves de l'efficacité des différents traitements du LPE buccal, alors qu'aucune preuve n'a été trouvée concernant le LPE génital. Des ECR supplémentaires à plus grande échelle sont nécessaires dans les populations de personnes atteintes de LPE buccal et génital. Nous suggérons que les études futures adoptent des mesures de résultat standardisées qui soient de réelle importance clinique pour les personnes touchées. Nous recommandons la mesure d'un score de gravité clinique et d'un score de symptômes établi par le participant, au moyen d'outils de notation de la gravité approuvés et validés. Nous recommandons également le développement d'un outil combiné et validé de notation de la gravité qui puisse être utilisé tant pour les cas buccaux que génitaux.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour le lichen plan érosif affectant les muqueuses

Traitements pour le lichen plan érosif affectant les muqueuses

Le lichen plan érosif (LPE) est une affection de la bouche, de l'œsophage (gorge comprise) et de la région ano-génitale. Il est causé par la suractivation du système immunitaire. Il est souvent plus douloureux et invalidant que les formes non-érosives de lichen plan. Selon la région affectée, les personnes touchées peuvent éprouver des douleurs et avoir des difficultés pour manger, uriner ou avoir des rapports sexuels. Le traitement est difficile et vise à contrôler les symptômes plutôt qu'à guérir. Plusieurs crèmes et comprimés sont utilisés, avec des résultats variables.

Cette revue a examiné l'efficacité des traitements du LPE. Quinze études ont été incluses dans cette revue, soit un total de 473 participants atteints de LPE. Toutes portaient sur la forme orale, et non génitale, de la maladie. De nombreuses études ont été exclues, soit parce qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'essais contrôlés randomisés (dans lesquels les participants sont divisés en deux groupes de manière aléatoire), soit parce qu'elles avaient recruté des participants atteints de toutes formes de lichen plan et ne s'étaient pas limitées aux sous-types érosifs. Toutes ces études portaient sur un petit nombre de cas (entre 12 et 94) et utilisaient une variété de méthodes d'évaluation et de calendriers différents ; il ne fut donc pas possible de combiner ou de comparer directement les résultats des études.

Nous n'avons trouvé que de faibles preuves de l'efficacité des différents traitements du LPE buccal. Aucune des études ne s'est intéressée aux formes génitale ou œsophagienne de la maladie et aucun constat n'a donc pu être établi concernant le traitement de ces affections. Une petite étude a constaté que le propionate de clobétasol à 0,025 % (un stéroïde topique très puissant) administré par vaporisation réduisait significativement mieux la douleur qu'en pommade. Dans une autre étude, une différence significative au niveau de la douleur avait été observée dans le petit sous-groupe de 11 participants atteints de LPE, donnant un avantage à la solution de ciclosporine par rapport à l'acétonide de triamcinolone 0,1 % dans de l'Orabase (un stéroïde topique puissant). Dans une étude impliquant 45 participants atteints de LPE, le gel d'aloe vera était six fois plus susceptible d'aboutir à un allégement d'au moins 50 % des symptômes de douleur, en comparaison avec le placebo.

Plusieurs effets secondaires ont été signalés, mais aucun n'était grave. Avec les corticostéroïdes topiques, les principaux effets secondaires étaient l'infection par candidose buccale et des douleurs ou une gène dans le haut de l'abdomen. Des brûlures passagères ont été fréquemment signalées lors de l'utilisation d'une pommade de tacrolimus à 0,1 % et d'une crème de pimecrolimus à 0,1 %.

Dans l'ensemble, il n'y avait pas de preuves irréfutables de l'efficacité d'un quelconque des traitements généralement utilisés comme traitement de première intention pour le LPE, stéroïdes topiques compris. Cela était principalement dû à l'absence d'essais de bonne qualité et bien menés, ainsi qu'aux petits effectifs de participants.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 18th May, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français