Intervention Review

Pharmacological interventions for hypertension in children

  1. Swasti Chaturvedi1,*,
  2. Deborah H Lipszyc2,
  3. Christoph Licht3,
  4. Jonathan C Craig4,
  5. Rulan Parekh5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hypertension Group

Published Online: 1 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 11 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008117.pub2

How to Cite

Chaturvedi S, Lipszyc DH, Licht C, Craig JC, Parekh R. Pharmacological interventions for hypertension in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD008117. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008117.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Christian Medical College, Department of Paediatrics, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

  2. 2

    Hospital for Sick Children, Institute of Medical Science, Toronto, ON, Canada

  3. 3

    Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Nephrology, Toronto, ON, Canada

  4. 4

    The University of Sydney, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  5. 5

    Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON, Canada

*Swasti Chaturvedi, Department of Paediatrics, Christian Medical College, Ida Scudder Road, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632004, India. swasti.chaturvedi@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 1 FEB 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, coronary artery disease and kidney damage in adults. There is a paucity of data on the long-term sequelae of persistent hypertension in children, but it is known that children with hypertension have evidence of end organ damage and are at risk of hypertension into adulthood. The prevalence of hypertension in children is rising, most likely due to a concurrent rise in obesity rates. In children with hypertension, non-pharmacological measures are often recommended as first-line therapy, but a significant proportion of children will eventually require pharmacological treatment to reduce blood pressure, especially those with evidence of end organ damage at presentation or during follow-up. A systematic review of the effects of antihypertensive agents in children has not previously been conducted.

Objectives

To determine the dose-related effects of different classes of antihypertensive medications, as monotherapy compared to placebo; as combination therapy compared to placebo or a single medication; or in comparisons of various doses within the same class, on systolic or diastolic blood pressure (or both) in children with hypertension.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Hypertension Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to October 2013), Ovid EMBASE (1974 to October 2013) and bibliographic citations.

Selection criteria

The selection criteria were deliberately broad due to there being few clinical trials in children. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of at least two weeks duration comparing antihypertensive agents either as monotherapy or combination therapy with either placebo or another medication, or comparing different doses of the same medication, in children with hypertension. Hypertension was defined as an average (over a minimum of three readings) systolic or diastolic blood pressure (or both) on the 95th percentile or above for age, height and gender. 

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently selected relevant studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We summarised data, where possible, using a random-effects model. Formal assessment of heterogeneity was not possible because of insufficient data.

Main results

A total of 21 trials evaluated antihypertensive medications of various drug classes in 3454 hypertensive children with periods of follow-up ranging from three to 24 weeks. There were five RCTs comparing an antihypertensive drug directly with placebo, 12 dose-finding trials, two trials comparing calcium channel blockers with angiotensin receptor blockers, one trial comparing a centrally acting alpha blocker with a diuretic and one trial comparing an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with an angiotensin receptor blocker. No randomised trial was identified that evaluated the effectiveness of antihypertensive medications on target end organ damage. The trials were of variable quality and most were funded by pharmaceutical companies.

Among the angiotensin receptor blockers, candesartan (one trial, n = 240), when compared to placebo, reduced systolic blood pressure by 6.50 mmHg (95% confidence interval (CI) -9.44 to -3.56) and diastolic blood pressure by 5.50 mmHg (95% CI -9.62 to -1.38) (low-quality evidence). High dose telmisartan (one trial, n = 76), when compared to placebo, reduced systolic blood pressure by -8.50 (95% CI -13.79 to -3.21) but not diastolic blood pressure (-4.80, 95% CI -9.50 to 0.10) (low-quality evidence). Beta blocker (metoprolol, one trial, n = 140), when compared with placebo , significantly reduced systolic blood pressure by 4.20 mmHg (95% CI -8.12 to -0.28) but not diastolic blood pressure (-3.20 mmHg 95% CI -7.12 to 0.72) (low-quality evidence). Beta blocker/diuretic combination (Bisoprolol/hydrochlorothiazide, one trial, n = 94)when compared with placebo , did not result in a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (-4.0 mmHg, 95% CI -8.99 to -0.19) but did have an effect on diastolic blood pressure (-4.50 mmHg, 95% CI -8.26 to -0.74) (low-quality evidence). Calcium channel blocker (extended-release felodipine,one trial, n = 133) was not effective in reducing systolic blood pressure (-0.62 mmHg, 95% CI -2.97 to 1.73) or diastolic blood pressure (-1.86 mmHg, 95% CI -5.23 to 1.51) when compared with placebo. Further, there was no consistent dose response observed among any of the drug classes. The adverse events associated with the antihypertensive agents were mostly minor and included headaches, dizziness and upper respiratory infections.

Authors' conclusions

Overall, there are sparse data informing the use of antihypertensive agents in children, with outcomes reported limited to blood pressure and not end organ damage. The most data are available for candesartan, for which there is low-quality evidence of a modest lowering effect on blood pressure. We did not find evidence of a consistent dose response relationship for escalating doses of angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. All agents appear safe, at least in the short term.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Medications for high blood pressure in children

Hypertension (high blood pressure) is known to increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. The prevalence of hypertension in children is rising. A significant proportion of children with hypertension require medication to reduce blood pressure and medication use has increased significantly over the past several years. 

This systematic review includes 21 trials, involving 3454 children, which evaluated different medications to lower blood pressure among children with hypertension. This evidence is up to date as of October 2013. Most trials were of very short duration with the average being seven weeks. The studies were of variable quality and mostly industry funded. Not all studies compared the effect of medication on blood pressure lowering to a placebo. Only a few classes of the commonly prescribed drugs have been evaluated and most had a modest effect on blood pressure, but it is uncertain whether this results in improved long-term outcomes for children. Higher doses of medication did not result in greater reduction of blood pressure. All of the drugs studied were safe for use, at least in the short term.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pharmacologiques pour l'hypertension chez l'enfant

Contexte

L'hypertension est un important facteur de risque d'AVC, de coronaropathie et de lésions rénales chez l'adulte. Peu de données sont disponibles sur les séquelles à long terme de l'hypertension persistante chez l'enfant, mais il est connu que les enfants souffrant d'hypertension montrent des signes de lésions des organes cibles et sont à risque d'hypertension à l'âge adulte. La prévalence de l'hypertension chez l'enfant est en augmentation, probablement en raison d'une augmentation parallèle des taux d'obésité. Chez l'enfant atteint d'hypertension, les mesures non pharmacologiques sont souvent recommandées en traitement de première intention, mais une proportion significative des enfants nécessiteront en fin de compte un traitement pharmacologique pour réduire la pression artérielle, en particulier ceux montrant des signes de lésions aux organes cibles à la présentation ou pendant le suivi. Une revue systématique des effets des agents antihypertenseurs chez l'enfant n'a pas encore été réalisée.

Objectifs

Déterminer les effets dose-dépendants de différentes classes de médicaments antihypertenseurs, en monothérapie par rapport à un placebo ; en association par rapport à un placebo ou à un seul traitement ; ou en comparant différentes doses dans une même classe, sur la pression artérielle systolique ou diastolique (ou les deux) chez l'enfant souffrant d'hypertension.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur l'hypertension artérielle, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (2013, numéro 9), Ovid MEDLINE (de 1946 à octobre 2013), Ovid EMBASE (de 1974 à octobre 2013) et les références bibliographiques.

Critères de sélection

Les critères de sélection ont été délibérément larges en raison du peu d'essais cliniques existant chez l'enfant. Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) d'une durée d'au moins deux semaines comparant des agents antihypertenseurs en monothérapie ou en association par rapport à un placebo ou à un autre médicament, ou comparant différentes doses d'un même médicament, chez l'enfant souffrant d'hypertension. L'hypertension était définie comme une pression artérielle systolique ou diastolique (ou les deux) moyenne (sur un minimum de trois mesures) égale ou supérieure au 95e percentile pour l'âge, la taille et le sexe.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné indépendamment les études pertinentes, extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais. Nous avons résumé les données, lorsque cela était possible, en utilisant un modèle à effets aléatoires. Une évaluation formelle de l'hétérogénéité n'a pas été possible en raison de données insuffisantes.

Résultats Principaux

Un total de 21 essais évaluaient des médicaments antihypertenseurs de différentes classes chez 3 454 enfants hypertendus avec des périodes de suivi allant de trois à 24 semaines. Ces essais incluaient cinq ECR comparant un antihypertenseur directement avec un placebo, 12 essais de dose, deux essais comparant des inhibiteurs des canaux calciques avec des inhibiteurs des récepteurs de l'angiotensine, un essai comparant un alpha-bloquant agissant centralement avec un diurétique et un essai comparant un inhibiteur de l'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine avec un inhibiteur des récepteurs de l'angiotensine. Aucun essai randomisé n'a été identifié qui ait évalué l'efficacité des médicaments antihypertenseurs sur les lésions des organes cibles. Les essais étaient de qualité variable et la plupart étaient financés par des laboratoires pharmaceutiques.

Parmi les inhibiteurs des récepteurs de l'angiotensine, le candésartan (un essai, n = 240), en comparaison avec un placebo, a réduit la pression artérielle systolique de 6,50 mmHg (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % -9,44 à -3,56) et la pression artérielle diastolique de 5,50 mmHg (IC à 95 % -9,62 à -1,38) (preuves de faible qualité). Le telmisartan à haute dose (un essai, n = 76), en comparaison avec un placebo, a réduit la pression artérielle systolique de -8,50 (IC à 95 % -13,79 à -3,21), mais pas la pression diastolique (-4,80, IC à 95 % -9,50 à 0,10) (preuves de faible qualité). Le bêta-bloquant (métoprolol, un essai, n = 140), en comparaison avec un placebo, a réduit la pression artérielle systolique de façon significative de 4,20 mmHg (IC à 95 % -8,12 à -0,28), mais pas la pression diastolique (-3,20 mmHg, IC à 95 % -7,12 à 0,72) (preuves de faible qualité). L'association bêta-bloquant/diurétique (bisoprolol/hydrochlorothiazide, un essai, n = 94) en comparaison avec un placebo, n'a pas entraîné de réduction significative de la pression artérielle systolique (-4,0 mmHg, IC à 95 % -8,99 à -0,19) mais a eu un effet sur la pression artérielle diastolique (-4,50 mmHg, IC à 95 % -8,26 à -0,74) (preuves de faible qualité). L'inhibiteur des canaux calciques (félodipine à libération prolongée, un essai, n = 133) n'était pas efficace pour réduire la pression artérielle systolique (-0,62 mmHg, IC à 95 % -2,97 à 1,73) ou diastolique (-1,86 mmHg, IC à 95 % -5,23 à 1,51) par rapport à un placebo. Par ailleurs, aucune relation dose-effet constante n'a été observée pour aucune classe de médicaments. Les événements indésirables associés aux agents antihypertenseurs ont été principalement mineurs et ont inclus céphalées, étourdissements et infections des voies respiratoires hautes.

Conclusions des auteurs

Dans l'ensemble, il existe des données éparses sur l'utilisation d'agents antihypertenseurs chez l'enfant, rapportant des résultats limités à la pression artérielle sans données sur les lésions des organes cibles. Le plus de données sont disponibles pour le candésartan, pour lequel il existe des preuves de faible qualité d'un effet modeste sur la diminution de la pression artérielle. Nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuve d'une relation dose-effet constante pour des doses croissantes d'inhibiteurs des récepteurs de l'angiotensine, des canaux calciques ou de l'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine. Tous les agents semblent sûrs, du moins à court terme.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pharmacologiques pour l'hypertension chez l'enfant

Médicaments pour une pression artérielle élevée chez les enfants

L'hypertension (une pression artérielle élevée) est connue pour augmenter le risque de maladie cardiaque, d'accident vasculaire cérébral et d'insuffisance rénale. La prévalence de l'hypertension chez les enfants est en augmentation. Une proportion significative des enfants souffrant d'hypertension nécessitent un traitement médicamenteux pour réduire la pression artérielle et l'utilisation de médicaments a augmenté significativement ces dernières années.

Cette revue systématique inclut 21 essais, portant sur 3 454 enfants, qui évaluaient différents médicaments pour abaisser la tension artérielle chez les enfants souffrant d'hypertension. Les preuves sont à jour en octobre 2013. La plupart des essais étaient de très courte durée, la moyenne étant de sept semaines. Les études étaient de qualité variable et le plus souvent financées par l'industrie. Toutes les études ne comparaient pas l'effet du médicament sur la diminution de la pression artérielle à un placebo. Seulement quelques classes de médicaments couramment prescrits ont été évaluées et la plupart avaient un effet modeste sur la pression artérielle, mais on ignore si cela entraîne une amélioration des résultats à long terme pour les enfants. Des doses plus élevées de médicament n'ont pas apporté de plus grande réduction de la pression artérielle. Tous les médicaments étudiés étaient sûrs à utiliser, du moins à court terme.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé