Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Prophylactic antibiotics to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies

  1. Richard Foon1,*,
  2. Philip Toozs-Hobson2,
  3. Pallavi Latthe3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Incontinence Group

Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 DEC 2009

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008224.pub2


How to Cite

Foon R, Toozs-Hobson P, Latthe P. Prophylactic antibiotics to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD008224. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008224.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Shrewsbury hospital, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK

  2. 2

    Birmingham Women's Hospital, Urogynaecology, Birminhgam, UK

  3. 3

    Birmingham Women's Hospital, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Birmingham, UK

*Richard Foon, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Shrewsbury hospital, Mytton Oak Road, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, SY3 8XQ, UK. rpfoon@doctors.org.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

There is a risk that people who have invasive urodynamic studies (cystometry) will develop urinary tract infections or bacteria in the urine or blood. However, the use of prophylactic antibiotics before or immediately after invasive cystometry or urodynamic studies is not without risks of adverse effects and emergence of resistant microbes.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness and safety of administering prophylactic antibiotics in reducing the risk of urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies. The hypothesis was that administering prophylactic antibiotics reduces urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trial Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to January 2009), CINAHL (January 1982 to January 2009), EMBASE (January 1966 to January 2009), PubMed (1 January 1980 to January 2009), LILACS (up to January 2009), TRIP database (up to January 2009), and the UK NHS Evidence Health Information Resources (searched 10 December 2009). We searched the reference lists of relevant articles, the primary trials and the proceedings of the International Urogynaecological Association International Continence Society and the American Urological Association for the years 1999 to 2009 to identify articles not captured by electronic searches. There were no language restrictions.

Selection criteria

All randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials comparing the use of prophylactic antibiotics versus a placebo or no treatment in patients having urodynamic studies were selected. Two authors (PL and RF) independently performed the selection of trials for inclusion and any disagreements were resolved by discussion.

Data collection and analysis

All assessments of the quality of trials and data extraction were performed independently by two authors of the review (PL and RF) using forms designed according to Cochrane guidelines. We attempted to contact authors of the included trials for any missing data. Data were extracted on characteristics of the study participants including details of previously administered treatments, interventions used, the methods used to measure infection and adverse events.

Statistical analyses were performed according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Data from intention-to-treat analyses were used where available. For the dichotomous data, results for each study were expressed as a risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and combined for meta-analysis using the Mantel-Haenszel method.

The primary outcome was urinary tract infection. Heterogeneity was assessed by the P value and I2 statistic.

Main results

Nine randomized controlled trials involving the prophylactic use of antibiotics in patients having urodynamic studies were identified and these included 973 patients in total; one study was an abstract. Two further trials were excluded from the review. The methods of the included trials were poorly described.

The primary outcome in all trials was the rate of developing significant bacteriuria, defined as the presence of more than 100,000 bacteria per millilitre of a mid-stream urine sample on culture and sensitivity testing. The other outcomes included pyrexia, haematuria, dysuria and adverse reactions to antibiotics.

The administration of prophylactic antibiotics when compared to a placebo reduced the risk of significant bacteriuria (4% with antibiotics versus 12% without, risk ratio (RR) 0.35, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.56) in both men and women. The administration of prophylactic antibiotics also reduced the risk of haematuria (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.91). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the primary outcome, risk of symptomatic urinary tract infection (40/201, 20% versus 59/214, 28%; RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.03); or in the risk of fever (RR 5.16, 95% CI 0.94 to 28.16) or dysuria (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.36). Only two of 135 people had an adverse reaction to the antibiotics. The number of patients needed to treat with antibiotics to prevent bacteriuria was 12.3. Amongst women, the number needed to treat to prevent bacteriuria was 13.4; while amongst men it was 9.1 (number needed to treat = 1/ absolute risk reduction).

Authors' conclusions

Prophylactic antibiotics did reduce the risk of bacteriuria after urodynamic studies but there was not enough evidence to suggest that this effect reduced symptomatic urinary tract infections. There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of fever, dysuria or adverse reactions. Potential benefits have to be weighed against clinical and financial implications, and the risk of adverse effects.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prophylactic antibiotics to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies

Urodynamics is an invasive test which involves inserting a catheter into the bladder in order to help with diagnosis of bladder symptoms. It carries the risk of causing a urinary tract infection. We need to balance the risk of a urinary tract infection and the symptoms associated with such an infection (such as fever, pain passing urine) against the risk and cost of giving prophylactic antibiotics. Some people also pick up an increased number of bacteria in the urine but do not develop the signs of an infection (asymptomatic bacteriuria). We looked at the use of prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of urinary tract infections and bacteriuria. We identified nine trials including 973 people. We found that people were less likely to have bacteria in their urine after urodynamic studies if they had antibiotics (4% versus 12%). While they did have fewer urinary tract infections (20% compared with 28% with no antibiotics), this did not reach statistical significance. There were too few adverse effects, such as fever, pain when passing urine or a reaction to the antibiotics, for the findings to be reliable. However, people were less likely to have blood in their urine with antibiotics. There was no information about other treatments which might help reduce infections, nor about different doses or types of antibiotics.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les antibiotiques prophylactiques pour réduire le risque d'infections des voies urinaires après des études urodynamiques

Contexte

Il y a un risque que les personnes ayant subi des études urodynamiques invasives (cystomanométrie) développent des infections urinaires ou des bactéries dans l'urine ou le sang. Cependant, l'utilisation d'antibiotiques prophylactiques avant ou immédiatement après la cystomanométrie invasive ou les études urodynamiques n'est pas dépourvue du risque d'effets indésirables et d'émergence de microbes résistants.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'administration d'antibiotiques à titre prophylactique pour la réduction du risque d'infections des voies urinaires après des études urodynamiques. L'hypothèse était que l'administration d'antibiotiques prophylactiques réduit les infections des voies urinaires après des études urodynamiques.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'incontinence, ainsi que dans MEDLINE (de janvier 1966 à janvier 2009), CINAHL (de janvier 1982 à janvier 2009), EMBASE (de janvier 1966 à janvier 2009), PubMed (du 1er janvier 1980 à janvier 2009), LILACS (jusqu'à janvier 2009), la base de données TRIP (jusqu'à janvier 2009), et le UK NHS Evidence Health Information Resources (recherche effectuée le 10 décembre 2009). Nous avons cherché dans les références bibliographiques d'articles pertinents, les essais primaires et les actes de l'Association Urogynécologique Internationale, de la Société Internationale de Continence et de l'American Urological Association pour les années 1999 à 2009, afin d'identifier des articles non repérés au moyen des recherches électroniques. Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné tous les essais contrôlés randomisés et les essais quasi-randomisés comparant l'utilisation d'antibiotiques prophylactiques à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement chez des patients subissant des études urodynamiques. Deux auteurs (PL et RF) ont effectué indépendamment la sélection des essais à inclure et les désaccords ont été résolus par la discussion.

Recueil et analyse des données

Toutes les évaluations de qualité des essais et les extractions de données ont été réalisées indépendamment par deux auteurs de la revue (PL et RF) à l'aide de formulaires conçus conformément aux directives Cochrane. Nous avons tenté de contacter les auteurs d'essais inclus à propos de données manquantes. Nous avons extrait des données sur les caractéristiques des participants à l'étude, notamment des détails sur les traitements administrés antérieurement, les interventions utilisées, les méthodes utilisées pour mesurer l'infection et les effets indésirables.

Les analyses statistiques ont été réalisées conformément aux directives de la Cochrane Collaboration. Les données provenant d'analyses en intention de traiter ont été utilisées lorsqu'elles étaient disponibles. Pour les données dichotomiques, les résultats de chaque étude ont été exprimés sous forme de risque relatif (RR) avec intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %, puis combinés en une méta-analyse à l'aide de la méthode de Mantel-Haenszel.

Le principal critère de jugement était l'infection des voies urinaires. L'hétérogénéité a été évaluée au moyen de la valeur P et de la statistique I2.

Résultats Principaux

Neuf essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur l'utilisation prophylactique d'antibiotiques chez des patients subissant des études urodynamiques ont été identifiés, qui incluaient au total 973 patients ; une étude était un résumé. Deux autres essais ont été exclus de la revue. Les méthodes des essais inclus étaient mal décrites.

Le principal critère de jugement dans tous les essais était le taux de développement d'une bactériurie significative, définie comme la présence de plus de 100 000 bactéries par millilitre d'un échantillon d'urine à mi-jet sur un test de culture et de sensibilité. Les autres critères de jugement étaient notamment la pyrexie, l'hématurie, la dysurie et les réactions indésirables aux antibiotiques.

En comparaison avec le placebo, l'administration d'antibiotiques prophylactiques avait réduit le risque de bactériurie importante (4 % avec des antibiotiques contre 12 % sans, risque relatif (RR) 0,35 ; IC à 95% 0,22 à 0,56) chez les hommes comme chez les femmes. L'administration d'antibiotiques prophylactiques avait également réduit le risque d'hématurie (RR 0,46 ; IC à 95% 0,23 à 0,91). Toutefois, il n'y avait pas de différence statistiquement significative pour le principal critère de jugement, le risque d'infection symptomatique des voies urinaires (40 /201, 20 % versus 59/214, 28 % ; RR 0,73 ; IC à 95% 0,52 à 1,03), ou le risque de fièvre (RR 5,16 ; IC à 95% 0,94 à 28,16) ou de dysurie (RR 0,83 ; IC à 95% 0,5 à 1,36). Seules deux personnes sur 135 avaient eu une réaction indésirable aux antibiotiques. Le nombre de patients à traiter avec des antibiotiques pour prévenir une bactériurie était de 12,3. Chez les femmes, le nombre de personnes traiter pour prévenir une bactériurie était de 13,4 , tandis que chez les hommes il était de 9,1 (nombre de sujets à traiter = 1 / réduction absolue du risque).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les antibiotiques prophylactiques avaient réduit le risque de bactériurie après des études urodynamiques mais il n'y avait pas assez de données pour mettre en évidence que cet effet ait réduit les infections symptomatiques des voies urinaires. Il n'y avait pas de différence statistiquement significative pour le risque de fièvre, la dysurie ou les réactions indésirables. Les bénéfices potentiels doivent être mis en balance avec les implications cliniques et financières et le risque d'effets indésirables.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les antibiotiques prophylactiques pour réduire le risque d'infections des voies urinaires après des études urodynamiques

Les antibiotiques prophylactiques pour réduire le risque d'infections des voies urinaires après des études urodynamiques

L'examen urodynamique est une procédure invasive consistant à insérer un cathéter dans la vessie afin d'aider au diagnostic des symptômes de la vessie. Il comporte le risque de provoquer une infection des voies urinaires. Il convient de mettre en balance le risque d'infection des voies urinaires et les symptômes associés à une telle infection (tels que la fièvre et la douleur au moment d'uriner), avec le risque et le coût de l'administration d'antibiotiques à titre prophylactique. Certaines personnes aussi se retrouvent avec un nombre accru de bactéries dans l'urine mais ne développent pas de signes d'infection (bactériurie asymptomatique). Nous avons examiné l'utilisation des antibiotiques prophylactiques pour la prévention des infections urinaires et de la bactériurie. Nous avons identifié neuf essais totalisant 973 personnes. Nous avons constaté que les personnes étaient moins susceptibles d'avoir des bactéries dans l'urine après des études urodynamiques s'ils avaient reçu des antibiotiques (4 % versus 12 %). Bien que le nombre d'infections urinaires ait été réduit (20 % contre 28 % sans antibiotiques), cela n'avait pas atteint un niveau de signification statistique. Il y avait eu trop peu d'effets indésirables, tels que fièvre, douleur au moment d'uriner ou réaction aux antibiotiques, pour que les résultats soient considérés comme fiables. Avec des antibiotiques, les personnes étaient cependant moins susceptibles d'avoir du sang dans les urines. Il n'y avait pas d'information sur d'autres traitements susceptibles d'aider à réduire les infections, ni sur différentes doses ou différents types d'antibiotiques.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 2nd November, 2012
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�