Intervention Review

Intramedullary nailing for tibial shaft fractures in adults

  1. Xin Duan1,2,
  2. Mohammed Al-Qwbani1,
  3. Yan Zeng3,
  4. Wei Zhang1,4,
  5. Zhou Xiang1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 DEC 2009

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008241.pub2


How to Cite

Duan X, Al-Qwbani M, Zeng Y, Zhang W, Xiang Z. Intramedullary nailing for tibial shaft fractures in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008241. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008241.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chengdu, China

  2. 2

    The Second People's Hospital of Chengdu, Department of Orthopaedics, Chengdu, China

  3. 3

    No. 4 West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Oncology department, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  4. 4

    The General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army (PLAGH), Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Beijing, Beijing, China

*Zhou Xiang, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, China. Xiangzhou15@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Intramedullary nailing is commonly used for treating fractures of the tibial shaft. These fractures are one of the most common long bone fractures in adults.

Objectives

To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of different methods and types of intramedullary nailing for treating tibial shaft fractures in adults.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and reference lists of articles to December 2009. The search was subsequently updated to September 2011 to assess the more recent literature.

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies evaluating different methods and types of intramedullary nailing for treating tibial shaft fractures in adults were included. Primary outcomes were health-related quality of life, patient-reported function and re-operation for treatment failure or complications.

Data collection and analysis

At least two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment, and data collection and extraction.

Main results

Nine randomised and two quasi-randomised clinical trials, involving a total of 2093 participants with 2123 fractures, were included. The evidence was dominated by one large multicentre trial of 1319 participants. Both quasi-randomised trials were at high risk of selection bias. Otherwise, the trials were generally at low or unclear risk of bias. There were very few data on functional outcomes; and often incomplete data on re-operations. The trials evaluated five different comparisons of interventions: reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing (six trials); Ender nail versus interlocking nail (two trials); expandable nail versus interlocking nail (one trial); interlocking nail with one distal screw versus with two distal screws (one trial); and closed nailing via the transtendinous approach versus the paratendinous approach (one trial).

No statistically significant differences were found between the reamed and unreamed nailing groups in 'major' re-operations (66/789 versus 72/756; risk ratio (RR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64 to 1.21; 5 trials), or in the secondary outcomes of nonunion, pain, deep infection, malunion and compartment syndrome. While inconclusive, the evidence from a subgroup analysis suggests that reamed nailing is more likely to reduce the incidence of major re-operations related to non-union in closed fractures than in open fractures. Implant failure, such as broken screws, occurred less often in the reamed nailing group (35/789 versus 79/756; RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.61).

There was insufficient evidence established to determine the effects of interlocking nail with one distal screw versus with two distal screws, interlocking nail versus expandable nail and paratendinous approach versus transtendinous approach for treating tibial shaft fractures in adults.

Ender nails when compared with an interlocking nail in two trials resulted in a higher re-operation rate (12/110 versus 3/128; RR 4.43, 95% CI 1.37 to 14.32) and more malunions. There were no statistically significant differences between the two devices in the other reported secondary outcomes of nonunion, deep infection, and implant failure.

One trial found a lower re-operation rate for an expandable nail when compared with an interlocking nail (1/27 versus 9/26; RR 0.11, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.79). The differences between the two nails in the incidence of deep infection or neurological defects were not statistically significant.

The trial comparing one distal screw versus two distal screws found no statistically significant difference in nonunion between the two groups. However, it found significantly more implant failures in the one distal screw group (13/22 versus 1/20; RR 11.82, 95% CI 1.70 to 82.38).

One trial found no statistically significant differences in functional outcomes or anterior knee pain at three year follow-up between the transtendinous approach and the paratendinous approach for nail insertion.

Authors' conclusions

Overall, there is insufficient evidence to draw definitive conclusions on the best type of, or technique for, intramedullary nailing for tibial shaft fractures in adults. 'Moderate' quality evidence suggests that there is no clear difference in the rate of major re-operations and complications between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing. Reamed intramedullary nailing has, however, a lower incidence of implant failure than unreamed nailing. 'Low' quality evidence suggests that reamed nailing may reduce the incidence of major re-operations related to non-union in closed fractures rather than in open fractures. 'Low' quality evidence suggests that the Ender nail has poorer results in terms of re-operation and malunion than an interlocking nail.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Intramedullary nailing treat tibial shaft fractures in adults

Fractures of the tibial shaft (breaks in the bone situated in the long middle section of the tibia or shin bone) are mostly caused by high-energy trauma, such as motor vehicle accidents. One commonly used method of fixation is intramedullary nailing. This involves the insertion of a metal rod, usually from the upper side of the tibia, into the inner cavity (medulla) of the tibia. The rod is generally held in place by screws. An available and widely used surgical technique of intramedullary nailing is inserting intramedullary nails with reaming (the bone cavity is reamed, before inserting the nail into the bone cavity space) or without reaming. This review looked at the evidence from trials comparing various types of intramedullary nailing.

Eleven studies involving a total of 2093 participants were included. The evidence was dominated by one large multicentre trial of 1319 participants. The methods of two studies were flawed such that their results were likely to be biased. The remaining studies were at a lower risk of bias. The trials evaluated five different comparisons of interventions. Only the two comparisons tested by more than one trial are reported here. These were reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing (six trials) and Ender nail versus interlocking nail (two trials). The review found no evidence of a significant difference between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing in re-operations for complications, nor in various complications such as nonunion (where the bone fails to heal). However, reamed nailing was more associated with a lower implant failure, such as broken screws, than unreamed nailing. Moreover, there was some weak evidence that reamed nailing may be associated with fewer major re-operations for non-union when used for closed fractures (where the skin remains intact) compared with open (where the skin is broken) fractures. The review also found that the Ender nail resulted in more re-operations and deformity (malunion) than an interlocking nail. The review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to draw definitive conclusions on the best type of, or technique for, intramedullary nailing for tibial shaft fractures in adults.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Enclouage centromédullaire pour fracture de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte

Contexte

L'enclouage centromédullaire est couramment utilisé pour le traitement des fractures de la diaphyse tibiale. Ces fractures sont une des fractures des os longs les plus courantes chez l'adulte.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets (bénéfices et préjudices) de différentes méthodes et types d'enclouage centromédullaire pour le traitement des fractures de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre spécialisé du Groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés, MEDLINE, EMBASE et des bibliographies d'articles jusqu'à décembre 2009. La recherche a ensuite été mise à jour jusqu'à septembre 2011 afin d'évaluer la littérature la plus récente.

Critères de sélection

Ont été incluses des études cliniques contrôlées, randomisées et quasi-randomisées, évaluant différents types et méthodes d'enclouage centromédullaire pour le traitement des fractures de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte. Les principaux critères de résultat étaient la qualité de vie liée à la santé, le fonctionnement décrit par les patients et la ré-opération pour échec du traitement ou complications.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs, au moins, ont procédé à la sélection des études, l'évaluation du risque de biais, et la collecte et l'extraction des données de façon indépendante.

Résultats Principaux

Neuf essais cliniques randomisés et deux quasi-randomisés, impliquant un total de 2 093 participants avec 2 123 fractures, ont été inclus. Les résultats étaient dominés par un grand essai multicentrique de 1 319 participants. Les deux essais quasi-randomisés étaient à haut risque de biais de sélection. Sinon, les essais étaient généralement à risque faible ou incertain de biais. Il y avait très peu de données sur les résultats fonctionnels, et des données souvent incomplètes sur les ré-opérations. Les essais portaient sur cinq comparaisons d'interventions : enclouage centromédullaire avec alésage versus sans alésage (six essais) ; clou de Ender versus clou de verrouillage (deux essais) ; clou extensible versus clou de verrouillage (un essai) ; clou de verrouillage avec une seule vis distale versus avec deux vis distales (un essai) ; et enclouage fermé par l'approche transtendineuse versus l'approche paratendineuse (un essai).

Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'a été trouvée entre les groupes à enclouage avec alésage et sans alésage concernant les ré-opérations majeures (66/789 versus 72/756 ; risque relatif (RR) 0,88 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,64 à 1,21 ; 5 essais) ou les critères de résultat secondaires de pseudarthrose, douleur, infection profonde, cal vicieux et de syndrome de compartiment. Bien que non concluants, les résultats d'une analyse par sous-groupes suggèrent que l'enclouage avec alésage est plus susceptible de réduire l'incidence des ré-opérations majeures dues à la pseudarthrose dans les fractures fermées que dans les fractures ouvertes. Les échecs implantaires, tels que des vis cassées, survenaient moins souvent dans le groupe d'enclouage avec alésage (35/789 versus 79/756 ; RR 0,42, IC à 95 % 0,28 à 0,61).

Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer les effets du clou de verrouillage à une seule vis distale versus deux vis distales, du clou de verrouillage versus le clou extensible et de l'approche paratendineuse versus l'approche transtendineuse pour le traitement des fractures de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte.

Lorsque les clous de Ender étaient comparés à un clou de verrouillage (deux essais), on constatait un taux de ré-opération plus élevé (12/110 versus 3/128 ; RR 4,43 ; IC à 95 % 1,37 à 14,32) et plus de cals vicieux. Il n'y avait pas de différences statistiquement significatives entre les deux dispositifs pour les autres critères secondaires présentés de pseudarthrose, d'infection profonde et d'échec implantaire.

Un essai a constaté un taux de ré-opération plus faible pour un clou extensible en comparaison avec un clou de verrouillage (1/27 par rapport à 9/26 ; RR 0,11 ; IC à 95 % 0,01 à 0,79). Les différences entre les deux clous pour ce qui est de l'incidence de l'infection profonde ou des défauts neurologiques n'étaient pas statistiquement significatives.

L'essai comparant une seule vis distale versus deux vis distales n'a trouvé aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les deux groupes au niveau de la pseudarthrose. Il a toutefois constaté significativement plus d'échecs implantaires dans le groupe à une seule vis distale (13/22 versus 1/20 ; RR 11,82 ; IC à 95 % 1,70 à 82,38).

Un essai n'a trouvé aucune différence statistiquement significative dans les résultats fonctionnels ou les douleurs antérieures du genou après trois années de suivi entre les approches paratendineuse et transtendineuse d'insertion du clou.

Conclusions des auteurs

Globalement, il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour tirer des conclusions définitives sur le meilleur type ou la meilleure technique d'enclouage centromédullaire pour fracture de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte. Des preuves de qualité modérée suggèrent qu'il n'y a pas de différence nette au niveau du taux de ré-opérations majeures et de complications entre l'enclouage centromédullaire avec alésage et sans alésage. L'enclouage centromédullaire avec alésage a cependant une plus faible incidence d'échec implantaire que l'enclouage sans alésage. Des preuves de faible qualité suggèrent que l'enclouage avec alésage est plus susceptible de réduire l'incidence des ré-opérations majeures liées à la pseudarthrose dans les fractures fermées que dans les fractures ouvertes. Des preuves de faible qualité suggèrent que le clou de Ender a de moins bons résultats en termes de ré-opération et de cals vicieux qu'un clou de verrouillage.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Enclouage centromédullaire pour fracture de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte

L'enclouage centromédullaire pour traiter la fracture de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte

Les fractures de la diaphyse du tibia (fractures survenues dans la longue partie centrale de l'os du tibia) sont la plupart du temps causées par un traumatisme à haute énergie, comme un accident impliquant un véhicule motorisé. L'enclouage centromédullaire est une méthode de fixation couramment utilisée. Celle-ci implique l'insertion d'une tige métallique, habituellement par le côté supérieur du tibia, dans la cavité intérieure (medulla) du tibia. La tige est généralement maintenue en place par des vis. Une des techniques chirurgicales disponibles, et largement utilisée, d'enclouage centromédullaire consiste à insérer des clous centromédullaires avec alésage (la cavité osseuse est forée avant que le clou ne soit inséré dans l'espace de la cavité osseuse) ou sans alésage. Cette revue a examiné les résultats provenant d'essais ayant comparé différents types d'enclouage centromédullaire.

Onze études impliquant un total de 2 093 participants ont été incluses. Les résultats étaient dominés par un grand essai multicentrique de 1 319 participants. Les méthodes de deux études présentaient des défauts, de telle sorte que leurs résultats étaient susceptibles d'être biaisés. Les autres études avaient un plus faible risque de biais. Les essais portaient sur cinq comparaisons d'interventions. On ne rend compte ici que des deux comparaisons menées par plus d'un essai. Il s'agit de l'enclouage centromédullaire avec alésage versus sans alésage (six essais) et du clou de Ender versus clou de verrouillage (deux essais). La revue n'a trouvé aucune preuve d'une différence significative entre l'enclouage intramédullaire alésé et non-alésé concernant les ré-opérations pour complications ou diverses complications telles que la pseudarthrose (où l'os ne parvient pas à cicatriser). Toutefois, l'enclouage avec alésage était associé à moins d'échecs implantaires, tels que des vis cassées, que l'enclouage sans alésage. Par ailleurs, il y avait quelques faibles signes que l'enclouage avec alésage pourrait être associé à moins de ré-opérations majeures pour pseudarthrose lorsqu'il est utilisé pour des fractures fermées (où la peau reste intacte) que lorsqu'utilisé pour des fractures ouvertes (où la peau est déchirée). L'étude a également constaté que le clou de Ender aboutit à plus de ré-opérations et de difformités (cal vicieux) que le clou de verrouillage. La revue a conclu qu'il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour tirer des conclusions définitives sur le meilleur type ou la meilleure technique d'enclouage centromédullaire pour fracture de la diaphyse du tibia chez l'adulte.

Notes de traduction

La mise à jour de la recherche en septembre 2011, destinée à évaluer la littérature récente, a été initiée et réalisée par la base éditoriale du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires. La sélection des études a été réalisée par Helen Handoll.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th April, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français