Intervention Review

Piggy-back graft for liver transplantation

  1. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy1,*,
  2. Viniyendra Pamecha2,
  3. Brian R Davidson2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 19 JAN 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 18 NOV 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008258.pub2


How to Cite

Gurusamy KS, Pamecha V, Davidson BR. Piggy-back graft for liver transplantation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008258. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008258.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  2. 2

    Royal Free Hospital and University College School of Medicine, University Department of Surgery, London, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, 9th Floor, Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London, NW3 2QG, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 19 JAN 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Piggy-back method of transplantation, which involves preservation of the recipient retrohepatic inferior vena cava, has been suggested as an alternative to the conventional method of liver transplantation, where the recipient retrohepatic inferior vena cava is resected.

Objectives

To compare the benefits and harms of piggy-back technique versus conventional liver transplantation as well as of the different modifications of piggy-back technique during liver transplantation.

Search methods

We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until June 2010 for identifying randomised trials using search strategies.

Selection criteria

Only randomised clinical trials, irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status were considered for the review.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors (KSG and VP) independently identified trials and independently extracted data. We calculated the mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models with RevMan 5 based on intention-to-treat analysis for continuous outcomes. For binary outcomes, we used the Fisher's exact test since none of the comparisons of binary outcomes included more than one trial.

Main results

Two trials randomised in total 106 patients to piggy-back method (n = 53) versus conventional method with veno-venous bypass (n = 53). Both trials were at high risk of bias. There was no significant difference in post-operative mortality, primary graft non-function, vascular complications, renal failure, transfusion requirements, intensive therapy unit (ITU) stay, or hospital stay between the two groups. The warm ischaemic time was significantly shorter in the piggy-back method than the conventional method (MD -11.50 minutes; 95% CI -19.35 to -3.65; P < 0.01). The proportion of patients who developed chest complications were significantly higher in the the piggy-back method than the conventional method (75.8% versus 44.1%; P = 0.01).

One trial randomised 80 patients to piggy-back with porto-caval bypass (n = 40) versus piggy-back without porto-caval bypass (n = 40). This trial was at high risk of bias. There was no significant difference in post-operative mortality, re-transplantation due to primary graft non-function, vascular complications, renal failure, or hospital stay between the two groups. Fewer patients required blood transfusion in the piggy-back with porto-caval bypass group (55%) than the piggy-back without porto-caval bypass group (75%) (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference in the mean amount of blood transfused between the groups (MD -1.00 unit; 95% CI -2.19 to 0.19; P = 0.10). The ITU stay was significantly shorter in the piggy-back with porto-caval bypass group (2.9 days) than the piggy-back without porto-caval bypass group (4.9 days; MD -2.00 days; 95% CI -3.82 to -0.18; P = 0.03).

There were no trials comparing piggy-back method with conventional method without veno-venous bypass or different techniques of piggy-back method.

Authors' conclusions

There is currently no evidence to recommend or refute the use of piggy-back method of liver transplantation.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Piggy-back method versus standard method of liver transplantation

During liver transplantation, the major vein to the heart (inferior vena cava (IVC)) is clamped (blocked by using clamps) by the surgeon in order to complete the operation. This allows a section of IVC to be removed along with the diseased liver. However, the clamping of the IVC can decrease the blood returning to the heart which has the potential to decrease the blood pressure and decrease the blood flow to the vital organs. To avoid this, an alternative method called piggy-back method has been proposed. In this method, the recipient vein IVC is retained. The donor IVC is then joined to the recipient vein.

We systematically searched various medical databases to determine how the piggy-back method compares with the standard method of liver transplantation or with different piggy-back techniques. Two clinical trials randomised 106 patients to the piggy-back method (53 patients) versus the standard method (53 patients). Both trials were at high risk of systematic errors. There was no significant difference in post-operative death, primary graft non-function (the liver graft does not start functioning at all), complications related to the blood vessels, kidney failure, blood transfusion requirements, intensive therapy unit (ITU) stay, or hospital stay between the two groups. The proportion of patients who developed chest complications were significantly higher with the piggy-back method than with the conventional method (76% in piggy-back method versus 44% in conventional method; statistically significant). One trial randomised 80 patients to a variant of piggy-back (in which blood from the intestines is temporarily diverted; 40 patients) versus standard piggy-back method (in which blood from the intestines is blocked; 40 patients). This trial was at high risk of systematic error. There was no significant difference in post-operative death, re-transplantation due to primary graft non-function (liver graft does not start functioning at all), vascular complications, kidney failure, or hospital stay between the two groups. Significantly fewer patients required blood transfusion with the variant piggy-back method (55%) than with the standard piggy-back method (75%). The ITU stay was significantly shorter in the variant (2.9 days) than with the standard piggy-back method (4.9 days). There were no trials comparing piggy-back method and standard method of liver transplantation without diversion of venous blood or different techniques of piggy-back method. We conclude that there is currently no evidence to recommend or refute the use of piggy-back method of liver transplantation.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Injerto “piggy back” para el trasplante hepático

El método de trasplante “piggy back”, que incluye la preservación de la vena cava inferior retrohepática beneficiaria, se ha sugerido como una opción al método convencional de trasplante hepático, en que se reseca esta vena.

Objetivos

Comparar los efectos beneficiosos y perjudiciales de la técnica “piggy back” versus el trasplante hepático convencional y también de las diferentes modificaciones de la técnica “piggy back” durante el trasplante hepático.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se realizaron búsquedas en el Registro de Ensayos Controlados del Grupo Cochrane Hepatobiliar (Cochrane HepatoBiliary Group), el Registro Cochrane Central de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CENTRAL), en la Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, y Science Citation Index Expanded hasta junio de 2010 para identificar ensayos aleatorios mediante las estrategias de búsqueda.

Criterios de selección

Para esta revisión, sólo se consideraron los ensayos clínicos aleatorios, independientemente del idioma, el cegamiento o el estado de publicación.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores (KSG y VP), de forma independiente, identificaron los ensayos y extrajeron los datos. Se calculó la diferencia de medias (DM) o la diferencia de medias estandarizada (DME) con intervalos de confianza (IC) del 95% mediante los modelos de efectos fijos y de efectos aleatorios con RevMan 5 sobre la base del análisis de intención de tratar para los resultados continuos. Para los resultados binarios, se utilizó la prueba exacta de Fisher ya que ninguna de las comparaciones de los resultados binarios incluyó más de un ensayo.

Resultados principales

Dos ensayos asignaron al azar a un total de 106 pacientes al método “piggy back” (n = 53) versus el método convencional con derivación venovenosa (n = 53). Ambos ensayos presentaban alto riesgo de sesgo. No hubo diferencias significativas en la mortalidad posoperatoria, el fracaso de la función del injerto, las complicaciones vasculares, la insuficiencia renal, la necesidad de transfusión, la estancia en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (UCI), o la estancia hospitalaria entre los dos grupos. El tiempo de isquemia tibia fue significativamente más corto en el método “piggy back” que en el método convencional (DM −11,50 minutos; IC del 95%: −19,35 a −3,65; P < 0,01). La proporción de pacientes que desarrollaron complicaciones torácicas fue significativamente mayor en el método “piggy back” que en el método convencional (75,8% versus 44,1%; P = 0,01).

Un ensayo asignó al azar a 80 pacientes al método “piggy back” con derivación portocava (n = 40) versus “piggy back” sin derivación portocava (n = 40). Este ensayo tuvo un riesgo alto de sesgo. No hubo diferencias significativas en la mortalidad posoperatoria, el nuevo trasplante debido al fracaso de la función del injerto primario, las complicaciones vasculares, la insuficiencia renal, o la estancia hospitalaria entre los dos grupos. Menos pacientes necesitaron transfusión de sangre en el grupo de “piggy back” con derivación portocava (55%) en comparación con el grupo de “piggy back” sin derivación portocava (75%) (p = 0,02). No se encontraron diferencias significativas en la cantidad promedio de sangre transfundida entre los grupos (DM −1,00 unidad; IC del 95%: −2,19 a 0,19; P = 0,10). La estancia en la UCI fue significativamente más corta en el grupo de “piggy back” con derivación portocava (2,9 días) en comparación con el grupo de “piggy back” sin derivación portocava (4,9 días; DM −2,00 días; IC del 95%: −3,82 a −0,18; P = 0,03).

No hubo ningún ensayo que comparara el método “piggy back” con el método convencional sin derivación venovenosa o diferentes técnicas del método “piggy back”.

Conclusiones de los autores

No existen en la actualidad pruebas para recomendar o refutar el uso del método “piggy back” de trasplante hepático.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Méthode « piggy-back » de transplantation hépatique

Contexte

La méthode piggy-back de transplantation, qui implique la préservation de la veine cave inférieure rétrohépatique du receveur, a été proposée comme une alternative à la méthode classique de greffe du foie, dans laquelle la veine cave inférieure rétrohépatique du receveur est réséquée.

Objectifs

Comparer les bénéfices et les risques de la technique de piggy-back à ceux de la greffe du foie classique, ainsi qu'aux différentes modifications de la technique piggy-back lors d'une greffe du foie.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans Le registre des essais contrôlés du groupe Cochrane sur les affections hépato-biliaires, le Registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, et Science Citation Index Expanded jusqu'au mois de juin 2010 afin d'identifier des essais randomisés en utilisant les stratégies de recherche.

Critères de sélection

N'ont été pris en considération pour la revue que les essais cliniques randomisés, indépendamment de la langue, de la mise en aveugle, ou du statut de la publication.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs (KSG et VP) ont identifié les essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons calculé, à l'aide du logiciel RevMan 5, la différence moyenne (DM) ou la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) avec intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % sur la base d'une analyse en intention de traiter avec les modèles à effets fixes et à effets aléatoires pour les résultats continus. Pour les résultats binaires, nous avons utilisé le test exact de Fisher puisque aucune des comparaisons des résultats binaires ne portait sur plus d'un essai.

Résultats Principaux

Deux essais ont randomisé un total de 106 patients dans le groupe de la méthode piggy-back (n = 53) versus la méthode classique avec pontage veino-veineux (n = 53). Ces deux essais présentaient des risques de biais élevés. Il n'y avait pas de différences significatives entre les deux groupes en ce qui concerne la mortalité postopératoire, la non-fonction primaire du greffon, les complications vasculaires, l'insuffisance rénale, les besoins de transfusion sanguine, la durée du séjour en unité de soins intensifs (USI), ou la durée d'hospitalisation. La durée de l'ischémie chaude était significativement plus courte avec la méthode piggy-back qu'avec la méthode classique (DM -11,50 minutes ; IC à 95 % -19,35 à -3,65 ; P < 0,01). La proportion de patients ayant développé des complications thoraciques était significativement plus élevée avec la méthode piggy-back qu'avec la méthode classique (75,8 % contre 44,1 % ; P = 0,01).

Un essai a randomisé 80 patients dans le groupe de la méthode piggy-back avec pontage porto-cave (n = 40) versus la méthode piggy-back sans pontage porto-cave (n = 40). Cet essai comportait un risque élevé de biais. Il n'y avait pas de différences significatives entre les deux groupes en ce qui concerne la mortalité postopératoire, la retransplantation due à la non-fonction primaire du greffon, les complications vasculaires, l'insuffisance rénale, ou la durée d'hospitalisation. Un nombre inférieur de patients a nécessité une transfusion sanguine dans le groupe de la méthode piggy-back avec pontage porto-cave (55 %) par rapport au groupe de la méthode piggy-back sans pontage porto-cave (75 %) (P = 0,02). Il n'y avait pas de différences significatives entre les groupes dans la quantité moyenne de sang transfusée (DM -1,00 unité ; IC à 95 % -2,19 à 0,19 ; P = 0,10). La durée du séjour en unité de soins intensifs (USI) était significativement plus courte dans le groupe de la méthode piggy-back avec pontage porto-cave (2,9 jours) que dans le groupe de la méthode piggy-back sans pontage porto-cave (4,9 jours ; DM -2,00 jours ; IC à 95 % -3,82 à -0,18 ; P = 0,03).

Il n'existait aucun essai ayant comparé la méthode piggy-back à la méthode classique sans pontage veino-veineux ou à des techniques différentes de la méthode piggy-back.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'existe actuellement aucun élément probant permettant de recommander ou de récuser l'utilisation de la méthode piggy-back dans la greffe du foie.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Méthode « piggy-back » de transplantation hépatique

Comparaison de la méthode « piggy-back » et de la méthode standard pour les greffes du foie

Lors d'une greffe du foie, la veine principale vers le cœur (la veine cave inférieure (VCI)) est clampée (bloquée en utilisant des pinces) par le chirurgien afin de mener à bien l'opération. Cela permet de retirer une partie de la VCI avec le foie malade. Cependant, le clampage de la VCI peut réduire la quantité de sang qui retourne au cœur, ce qui peut potentiellement diminuer la pression artérielle et le flux sanguin vers les organes vitaux. Pour éviter cette situation, une méthode alternative, appelée méthode « piggy-back », a été proposée. Dans cette méthode, la VCI du receveur est conservée. La VCI du donneur est ensuite reliée à la veine du receveur.

Nous avons effectué des recherches systématiques dans diverses bases de données médicales pour déterminer dans quelle mesure la méthode piggy-back est comparable à la méthode standard de greffe du foie ou à des techniques de piggy-back différentes. Deux essais cliniques ont randomisé 106 patients dans un groupe traité par la méthode « piggy-back » (53 patients) afin de comparer celle-ci à la méthode standard (53 patients). Ces deux essais présentaient des risques élevés d'erreurs systématiques (biais). Il n'y avait pas de différences significatives entre les deux groupes en ce qui concerne la mortalité postopératoire, la non-fonction primaire du greffon (le greffon de foie ne recommence pas à fonctionner du tout), les complications liées aux vaisseaux sanguins, l'insuffisance rénale, les besoins de transfusion sanguine, la durée du séjour en unité de soins intensifs, ou la durée d'hospitalisation. La proportion de patients ayant développé des complications thoraciques était significativement plus élevée avec la méthode piggy-back qu'avec la méthode classique (76 % pour la méthode piggy-back contre 44 % pour la méthode classique ; statistiquement significatif). Un essai a randomisé 80 patients dans le groupe d'une variante de la méthode piggy-back (dans laquelle le sang provenant des intestins est temporairement dévié ; 40 patients) comparé à la méthode piggy-back standard (dans laquelle le sang provenant des intestins est bloqué ; 40 patients). Cet essai comportait un risque élevé d'erreurs systématiques. Il n'y avait pas de différences significatives entre les deux groupes en ce qui concerne la mortalité postopératoire, la retransplantation due à la non-fonction primaire du greffon (le greffon de foie ne recommence pas à fonctionner du tout), les complications vasculaires, l'insuffisance rénale, ou la durée d'hospitalisation. Un nombre significativement inférieur de patients a nécessité une transfusion sanguine avec la variante de la méthode piggy-back (55 %) par rapport à la méthode piggy-back standard (75 %). La durée de séjour en soins intensifs était significativement plus courte chez les patients traités par la variante de la méthode piggy-back (2,9 jours) que chez ceux traités par la méthode piggy-back standard (4,9 jours). Il n'existait aucun essai comparant la méthode piggy-back et la méthode standard de greffe du foie sans dérivation du sang veineux ou des techniques différentes de la méthode piggy-back. Nous en avons conclu qu'il n'existe actuellement aucun élément probant permettant de recommander ou de récuser l'utilisation de la méthode piggy-back en cas de greffe du foie.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 2nd May, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.