Intervention Review

Chinese herbal medicines for hypercholesterolemia

  1. Zhao Lan Liu1,
  2. Jian Ping Liu1,*,
  3. Anthony Lin Zhang2,
  4. Qiong Wu3,
  5. Yao Ruan4,
  6. George Lewith5,
  7. Denise Visconte6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Metabolic and Endocrine Disorders Group

Published Online: 5 JUL 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 17 JUL 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008305.pub2


How to Cite

Liu ZL, Liu JP, Zhang AL, Wu Q, Ruan Y, Lewith G, Visconte D. Chinese herbal medicines for hypercholesterolemia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD008305. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008305.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China

  2. 2

    RMIT University, Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health Sciences, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia

  3. 3

    Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, School of Humanities, Beijing, Beijing, China

  4. 4

    Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, Beijing, China

  5. 5

    Complementary Medicine Research Unit, Visiting Professor, University of Westminster, Southampton, UK

  6. 6

    Primary Medical Care, Complementary and Integrated Medicine Research Unit, Southampton, UK

*Jian Ping Liu, Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 11 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100029, China. jianping_l@hotmail.com. jianping@fagmed.uit.no.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 5 JUL 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Hypercholesterolemia is an important key contributory factor for ischemic heart disease and is associated with age, high blood pressure, a family history of hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Chinese herbal medicines have been used for a long time as lipid-lowering agents.

Objectives

To assess the effects of Chinese herbal medicines on hypercholesterolemia.

Search methods

We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library (issue 8, 2010), MEDLINE (until July 2010), EMBASE (until July 2010 ), Chinese BioMedical Database (until July 2010), Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (until July 2010), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (until July 2010), Chinese VIP Information (until July 2010), Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database (until July 2010), and Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (until July 2010).

Selection criteria

We considered randomized controlled clinical trials in hypercholesterolemic participants comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, and pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We resolved any disagreements with this assessment through discussion and a decision was achieved based by consensus. We assessed trials for the risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias.

Main results

We included 22 randomized trials (2130 participants). The mean treatment duration was 2.3 ± 1.3 months (ranging from one to six months). Twenty trials were conducted in China and 18 trials were published in Chinese. Overall, the risk of bias of included trials was high or unclear. Five different herbal medicines were evaluated in the included trials, which compared herbs with conventional medicine in six comparisons (20 trials), or placebo (two trials). There were no outcome data in any of the trials on cardiovascular events and death from any cause. One trial each reported well-being (no significant differences) and economic costs. No serious adverse events were observed. Xuezhikang was the most commonly used herbal formula investigated. A significant effect on total cholesterol (two trial, 254 participants) was shown in favor of Xuezhikang when compared with inositol nicotinate (mean difference (MD) -0.90 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.13 to -0.68) .

Authors' conclusions

Some herbal medicines may have cholesterol-lowering effects. Our findings have to be interpreted with caution due to high or unclear risk of bias of the included trials.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Chinese herbal medicines for hypercholesterolemia

Hypercholesterolemia occurs when there is too much cholesterol in the blood. It is not a disease as such but a metabolic derangement. Elevated cholesterol in the blood is due to an increase in the amount of the so-called lipoproteins, particles that carry cholesterol in the bloodstream. There are two major types of cholesterol: HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol and LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia usually means elevated levels of total blood cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol with normal or low levels of HDL-cholesterol.

People with hypercholesterolemia have a higher risk of developing coronary artery disease, heart attacks, and stroke. Chinese herbal medicines have been commonly used and studied as cholesterol-lowering agents. To evaluate the effects of various herbal formulations (including single herbs, Chinese proprietary medicines, and mixtures of different herbs) for treating hypercholesterolemia, this review examined 22 randomized controlled trials of five different Chinese herbal medicines. The trials lasted from one to six months (average 2.3 months) and involved 2130 participants. There were no data on cardiovascular events and death from any cause. One trial each reported on well-being (no significant differences) and economic costs . No serious adverse events were observed. The available evidence suggests that several herbal medicines showed some cholesterol-lowering effect. However, due to considerable limitations in the quality of the included trials, further higher-quality and rigorously performed studies are required before any confident conclusions can be reached about the effects of Chinese herbal medicines for hypercholesterolemia.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Hierbas medicinales chinas para la hipercolesterolemia

La hipercolesterolemia es un importante factor contributivo crucial para la cardiopatía isquémica y se asocia con la edad, la hipertensión arterial, los antecedentes familiares de hipercolesterolemia y la diabetes. Las hierbas medicinales chinas se han usado durante mucho tiempo como agentes para la reducción de lípidos.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de las hierbas medicinales chinas sobre la hipercolesterolemia.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en las siguientes bases de datos: Cochrane Library (Número 8, 2010), MEDLINE (hasta julio 2010), EMBASE (hasta julio 2010), Chinese BioMedical Database (hasta julio 2010), Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (hasta julio 2010), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (hasta julio 2010), Chinese VIP Information (hasta julio 2010), Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database (hasta julio 2010) y Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (hasta julio 2010).

Criterios de selección

Se consideraron los ensayos clínicos controlados con asignación aleatoria en participantes hipercolesterolémicos que comparaban las hierbas medicinales chinas con placebo, ningún tratamiento e intervenciones farmacológicas o no farmacológicas.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores de la revisión, de forma independiente, extrajeron los datos y evaluaron el riesgo de sesgo. Cualquier desacuerdo con esta evaluación se resolvió mediante discusión y se logró una decisión sobre la base del consenso. El riesgo de sesgo de los ensayos se evaluó en comparación con los criterios clave: la generación de la secuencia aleatoria, la ocultación de la asignación, el cegamiento de los participantes, los datos de resultados incompletos, el informe selectivo de los resultados y otras fuentes de sesgo.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron 22 ensayos con asignación aleatoria (2 130 participantes). La duración media del tratamiento fue de 2,3 ± 1,3 meses (con un rango de uno a seis meses). Veinte ensayos se realizaron en China y 18 se publicaron en chino. En general, el riesgo de sesgo de los ensayos incluidos era alto o incierto. Se evaluaron cinco hierbas medicinales diferentes en los ensayos incluidos, que comparaban las hierbas con la medicación tradicional en seis comparaciones (20 ensayos), o placebo (dos ensayos). No hubo datos de resultado en ninguno de los ensayos sobre los eventos cardiovasculares y la mortalidad por todas las causas. Cada ensayo informó el bienestar (ninguna diferencia significativa) y los costes económicos. No se observaron eventos adversos graves. Se investigó el Xuezhikang que es la fórmula a base de hierbas usada más comúnmente. Se observó un efecto significativo sobre el colesterol total (dos ensayos, 254 participantes) a favor del Xuezhikang en comparación con el nicotinato de inositol (diferencia de medias [DM] −0,90 mmol/L; intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: −1,13 a −0,68).

Conclusiones de los autores

Algunas hierbas medicinales pueden tener efectos en cuanto a la reducción del colesterol. Nuestros hallazgos deben interpretarse con cuidado debido al riesgo alto o incierto de sesgo de los ensayos incluidos.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Plantes médicinales chinoises pour le traitement de l'hypercholestérolémie

Contexte

L'hypercholestérolémie est un important facteur de prédisposition à la cardiopathie ischémique et est associée à l'âge, à l'hypertension artérielle, aux antécédents familiaux d'hypercholestérolémie et au diabète. Les plantes médicinales chinoises sont utilisées de longue date comme agents hypolipidémiants.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des plantes médicinales chinoises dans l'hypercholestérolémie.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes : La Bibliothèque Cochrane (numéro 8, 2010), MEDLINE (jusqu'en juillet 2010), EMBASE (jusqu'en juillet 2010), Chinese BioMedical Database (jusqu'en juillet 2010), Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (jusqu'en juillet 2010), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (jusqu'en juillet 2010), Chinese VIP Information (jusqu'en juillet 2010), Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database et Chinese Dissertation Database (jusqu'en juillet 2010), et Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (jusqu'en juillet 2010).

Critères de sélection

Les essais cliniques comparatifs randomisés portant sur des participants hypercholestérolémiques et comparant des plantes médicinales chinoises à un placebo, une absence de traitement ou des interventions pharmacologiques ou non pharmacologiques ont été pris en compte.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de façon indépendante. Dans le cadre de cette évaluation, toute divergence a été résolue par discussion, et les décisions ont été prises par consensus. Le risque de biais des essais a été évalué sur la base des principaux critères suivants : génération de la séquence de randomisation, assignation secrète, assignation en aveugle des participants, données de résultats incomplètes, notification sélective des résultats et autres sources de biais.

Résultats Principaux

22 essais randomisés (2 130 participants) ont été inclus. La durée moyenne du traitement était de 2,3 ± 1,3 mois (pour une plage d'un à six mois). Vingt essais avaient été réalisés en Chine et 18 étaient publiés en chinois. Globalement, le risque de biais des essais inclus était élevé ou incertain. Les essais inclus évaluaient cinq plantes médicinales et comparaient ces plantes à un traitement standard dans le cadre de six comparaisons (20 essais) ou à un placebo (deux essais). Aucun des essais ne rapportait de données de résultats concernant les événements cardio-vasculaires et les décès toutes causes confondues. Pour chacun des remèdes évalués, un essai documentait le bien-être (aucune différence significative) et le coût du traitement. Aucun événement indésirable grave n'a été observé. Parmi les préparations à base de plantes étudiées, le Xuezhikang était le plus couramment utilisé. Un effet significatif sur le cholestérol total (deux essais, 254 participants) était observé en faveur du Xuezhikang par rapport au nicotinate d'inositol (différence moyenne (DM) de -0,90 mmol/l, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %, entre -1,13 et -0,68).

Conclusions des auteurs

Certaines plantes médicinales pourraient avoir des effets hypocholestérolémiants. Ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec précaution en raison d'un risque de biais élevé ou incertain dans les essais inclus.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Plantes médicinales chinoises pour le traitement de l'hypercholestérolémie

Plantes médicinales chinoises pour le traitement de l'hypercholestérolémie

L'hypercholestérolémie est une concentration excessive de cholestérol dans le sang. Il ne s'agit pas d'une maladie en tant que telle, mais plutôt d'un déséquilibre du métabolisme. Ce niveau élevé de cholestérol dans le sang est dû à une augmentation de la quantité de lipoprotéines, des particules qui transportent le cholestérol dans le courant sanguin. Il existe deux grandes catégories de cholestérol : le cholestérol HDL (contenu dans les lipoprotéines de haute densité) et le cholestérol LDL (contenu dans les lipoprotéines de faible densité). L'hypercholestérolémie est généralement due à un niveau élevé de cholestérol total ou de cholestérol LDL, avec un niveau normal ou faible de cholestérol HDL.

Les patients atteints d'hypercholestérolémie présentent un risque accru de maladie coronarienne, de crise cardiaque et d'accident vasculaire cérébral. Les plantes médicinales chinoises sont couramment utilisées et étudiées en tant qu'agents hypocholestérolémiants. Dans le but d'évaluer les effets de diverses préparations à base de plantes (y compris des plantes seules, des remèdes chinois brevetés et des mélanges de différentes plantes) dans le traitement de l'hypercholestérolémie, cette revue a examiné 22 essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur cinq remèdes chinois à base de plantes. Les essais duraient de un à six mois (2,3 mois en moyenne) et portaient sur 2 130 participants. Aucune donnée n'était disponible concernant les événements cardio-vasculaires et les décès toutes causes confondues. Pour chacun des remèdes évalués, un essai documentait le bien-être (aucune différence significative) et le coût du traitement. Aucun événement indésirable grave n'a été observé. Les preuves disponibles suggèrent que plusieurs remèdes à base de plantes présentent un effet hypocholestérolémiant. Néanmoins, compte tenu de la qualité très limitée des essais inclus, d'autres études de haute qualité réalisées de manière rigoureuse sont nécessaires avant de pouvoir tirer des conclusions définitives concernant les effets des plantes médicinales chinoises dans l'hypercholestérolémie.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.