Intervention Review

Non-pharmacological interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Fiona Cramp1,*,
  2. Sarah Hewlett1,
  3. Celia Almeida1,
  4. John R Kirwan2,
  5. Ernest HS Choy3,
  6. Trudie Chalder4,
  7. Jon Pollock1,
  8. Robin Christensen5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group

Published Online: 23 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008322.pub2

How to Cite

Cramp F, Hewlett S, Almeida C, Kirwan JR, Choy EHS, Chalder T, Pollock J, Christensen R. Non-pharmacological interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD008322. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008322.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of the West of England, Faculty of Health & Life Sciences, Bristol, UK

  2. 2

    University of Bristol, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Rheumatology Unit, Bristol, UK

  3. 3

    Cardiff University School of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Cardiff, UK

  4. 4

    Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, Department of Psychological Medicine, London, UK

  5. 5

    Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark, Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit (MSU), The Parker Institute, Dept Rheumatology, Copenhagen, Denmark

*Fiona Cramp, Faculty of Health & Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Glenside campus, Blackberry Hill, Bristol, BS16 1DD, UK. fiona.cramp@uwe.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Fatigue is a common and potentially distressing symptom for people with rheumatoid arthritis with no accepted evidence based management guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as physical activity and psychosocial interventions, have been shown to help people with a range of other long-term conditions to manage subjective fatigue.

Objectives

To evaluate the benefit and harm of non-pharmacological interventions for the management of fatigue in people with rheumatoid arthritis. This included any intervention that was not classified as pharmacological in accordance with European Union (EU) Directive 2001/83/EEC.

Search methods

The following electronic databases were searched up to October 2012, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; AMED; CINAHL; PsycINFO; Social Science Citation Index; Web of Science; Dissertation Abstracts International; Current Controlled Trials Register; The National Research Register Archive; The UKCRN Portfolio Database. In addition, reference lists of articles identified for inclusion were checked for additional studies and key authors were contacted.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials were included if they evaluated a non-pharmacological intervention in people with rheumatoid arthritis with self-reported fatigue as an outcome measure.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors selected relevant trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. Where appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis with a random-effects model.

Main results

Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 2882 participants with rheumatoid arthritis. Included studies investigated physical activity interventions (n = 6 studies; 388 participants), psychosocial interventions (n = 13 studies; 1579 participants), herbal medicine (n = 1 study; 58 participants), omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n = 1 study; 81 participants), Mediterranean diet (n = 1 study; 51 participants), reflexology (n = 1 study; 11 participants) and the provision of Health Tracker information (n = 1 study; 714 participants). Physical activity was statistically significantly more effective than the control at the end of the intervention period (standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.62 to -0.10; back translated to mean difference of 14.4 points lower, 95% CI -4.0 to -24.8 on a 100 point scale where a lower score means less fatigue; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 7, 95% CI 4 to 26) demonstrating a small beneficial effect upon fatigue. Psychosocial intervention was statistically significantly more effective than the control at the end of the intervention period (SMD -0.24, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.07; back translated to mean difference of 9.6 points lower, 95% CI -2.8 to -16.0 on a 100 point scale, lower score means less fatigue; NNTB 10, 95% CI 6 to 33) demonstrating a small beneficial effect upon fatigue. For the remaining interventions meta-analysis was not possible and there was either no statistically significant difference between trial arms or findings were not reported. Only three studies reported any adverse events and none of these were serious, however, it is possible that the low incidence was in part due to poor reporting. The quality of the evidence ranged from moderate quality for physical activity interventions and Mediterranean diet to low quality for psychosocial interventions and all other interventions.

Authors' conclusions

This review provides some evidence that physical activity and psychosocial interventions provide benefit in relation to self-reported fatigue in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. There is currently insufficient evidence of the effectiveness of other non-pharmacological interventions.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Non-pharmacological interventions for the management of patient-reported fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research that has investigated the effects of non-pharmacological treatments for fatigue in people with rheumatoid arthritis. 

After searching for all relevant studies, 24 were identified for inclusion in the review with a total of 2882 people. The findings are summarised as follows.

- Physical activity has a small benefit for managing fatigue in people with rheumatoid arthritis.

- Psychosocial therapy has a small benefit for managing fatigue in people with rheumatoid arthritis.

- No other interventions showed a difference in managing fatigue in people with rheumatoid arthritis. This may have happened by chance.

The information available regarding side effects and complications of the interventions was not very informative although it is unlikely that any side effects would cause a serious problem.

What is rheumatoid arthritis and what are non-pharmacological interventions?

When you have rheumatoid arthritis, your immune system, which normally fights infection, attacks the lining of your joints. This makes your joints swollen, stiff and painful. The small joints of your hands and feet are usually affected first. There is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis at present, so the treatments aim to relieve pain and stiffness and improve your ability to move. Fatigue is also a problem for people with rheumatoid arthritis.

Non-pharmacological interventions include any treatment that is not a registered drug, such as physical activity and psychosocial interventions (talking therapies). A talking therapy could include meeting with a counsellor, alone or in a group. It might involve writing about your thoughts and feelings in a journal and talking about it, problem-solving, setting goals and getting feedback about self-management. It might also include sessions on pain management and relaxation; and coping with depression. There are other non-pharmacological treatments that have been tested for their effect upon fatigue in people with rheumatoid arthritis. These include different dietary supplements and studies on the effects of giving people access to information about their own disease status. These treatments if supported by the overall body of evidence would allow the patient to have some personal control of their fatigue.

What happens to people with rheumatoid arthritis who use non-pharmacological interventions?

- At the end of the intervention, people receiving a control had a mean score of 63 on a scale of 0 to 100 with a lower score meaning less fatigue.

- People who used physical activity rated their fatigue as 54 on a scale of 0 to 100 at the end of the intervention, that is 9 points lower than the people who received the control.

- People who participated in a psychosocial intervention rated their fatigue as 57 on a scale of 0 to 100 at the end of the intervention, that is 6 points lower than the people who received the control.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions non pharmacologiques contre la fatigue dans la polyarthrite rhumatoïde

Contexte

La fatigue est un symptôme courant et potentiellement pénible pour les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde sans que l'on dispose de preuves acceptées fondées sur les recommandations de prise en charge. Il s'avère que les interventions non pharmacologiques, comme une activité physique et les interventions psychosociales, aident les personnes présentant tout un éventail d'autres pathologies à long terme à prendre en charge la fatigue subjective.

Objectifs

Évaluer les bénéfices et les risques des interventions non pharmacologiques pour la prise en charge de la fatigue chez les patients souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde. Cela incluait toute intervention qui n'était pas classée dans les traitements pharmacologiques conformément à la Directive 2001/83/CEE de l'Union européenne (UE).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes jusqu'à octobre 2012, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) ; MEDLINE ; EMBASE ; AMED ; CINAHL ; PsycINFO ; Social Science Citation Index ; Web of Science ; Dissertation Abstracts International ; le registre des essais contrôlés en cours ; le National Research Register Archive ; la base de données UKCRN Portfolio Database. En outre, les références bibliographiques des articles identifiés pour l'inclusion ont été vérifiées pour trouver des études supplémentaires et des auteurs majeurs ont été contactés.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés ont été inclus s'ils avaient évalué une intervention non pharmacologique chez les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde avec la fatigue rapportée par le patient comme critère de jugement mesuré.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné les essais pertinents, évalué le risque de biais et extrait les données. Lorsque cela était approprié, les données ont été regroupées dans une méta-analyse en utilisant un modèle à effets fixes.

Résultats Principaux

Vingt-quatre études répondaient aux critères d’inclusion et totalisaient 2 882 participants souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde. Les études incluses ont examiné des interventions axées sur l'activité physique (n = 6 études ; 388 participants), des interventions psychosociales (n = 13 études ; 1 579 participants), des plantes médicinales (n = 1 étude ; 58 participants), la supplémentation en acides gras riches en oméga-3 (n = 1 étude ; 81 participants), le régime méditerranéen (n = 1 étude ; 51 participants), la réflexologie (n = 1 étude ; 11 participants) et la mise à disposition des informations de veille sanitaire (n = 1 étude ; 714 participants). L'activité physique a été au plan statistique nettement plus efficace que l'intervention témoin à la fin de la période d'intervention (différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) -0,36, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % -0,62 à -0,10 ; convertie en différence moyenne de 14,4 points plus basse, IC à 95 % -4,0 à -24,8 sur une échelle en 100 points où un score inférieur indique une fatigue moindre ; nombre de sujets à traiter pour tirer un bénéfice supplémentaire (NNTB) de 7, IC à 95 % 4 à 26) révélant un petit effet bénéfique sur la fatigue. Les interventions psychosociales ont été au plan statistique nettement plus efficace que l'intervention témoin à la fin de la période d'intervention (DMS -0,24, IC à 95 % -0,40 à -0,07 ; convertie en différence moyenne de 9,6 points plus basse, IC à 95 % -2,8 à -16,0 sur une échelle en 100 points où un score inférieur indique une fatigue moindre ; NNTB 10, IC à 95 % 6 à 33) révélant un petit effet bénéfique sur la fatigue. Pour le reste des interventions, il n'a pas été possible de réaliser une méta-analyse et soit il n'y avait aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les bras des essais soit les résultats n'avaient pas été rapportés. Trois études uniquement ont rapporté des événements indésirables et aucun d'entre eux n'a été grave, toutefois, il est possible que la faible incidence ait été due en partie à la mauvaise méthode de notification des résultats. La qualité des preuves allait d'une qualité modérée pour les interventions axées sur l'activité physique et le régime méditerranéen, à une faible qualité pour les interventions psychosociales et toutes les autres interventions.

Conclusions des auteurs

Cette revue apporte quelques preuves que l'activité physique et les interventions psychosociales entraînent un bénéfice en ce qui concerne la fatigue rapportée par le patient chez l'adulte souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde. À l'heure actuelle, les preuves de l'efficacité des autres interventions non pharmacologiques sont insuffisantes.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions non pharmacologiques contre la fatigue dans la polyarthrite rhumatoïde

Interventions non pharmacologiques pour la prise en charge de la fatigue signalée par les patients dans la polyarthrite rhumatoïde

Ce résumé d’une revue Cochrane présente les connaissances tirées des recherches portant sur les effets des traitements non pharmacologiques contre la fatigue des patients souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde. 

À l'issue de la recherche de toutes les études pertinentes, 24 ont été identifiées pour l'inclusion dans la revue avec un effectif total de 2 882 patients. Les résultats sont résumés ainsi.

- L'activité physique offre un petit bénéfice pour la prise en charge de la fatigue chez les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde.

- La thérapie psychosociale offre un petit bénéfice pour la prise en charge de la fatigue chez les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde.

- Aucune autre intervention n'a révélé de différence dans la prise en charge de la fatigue chez les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde. Cela tient peut-être au hasard.

Les informations disponibles concernant les effets secondaires et les complications des interventions n'étaient pas très instructives bien qu'il soit improbable qu'un effet secondaire puisse entraîner un problème grave.

Qu’est-ce que la Polyarthrite rhumatoïde et que sont les Interventions non pharmacologiques ?

Lorsque vous souffrez d’une Polyarthrite rhumatoïde, votre système immunitaire, qui combat normalement les infections, attaque la paroi de vos articulations. Cela fait gonfler vos articulations et les rend raides et douloureuses. Les petites articulations de vos mains et de vos pieds sont généralement les premières touchées. Il n’existe à l’heure actuelle aucun remède pour la polyarthrite rhumatoïde et les traitements visent donc à soulager la douleur et la raideur, ainsi qu’à améliorer votre capacité à vous déplacer. La fatigue est aussi un problème pour les patients souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde.

Les interventions non pharmacologiques comprennent tout traitement qui n'est pas un médicament enregistré, comme une activité physique et des interventions psychosociales (thérapies fondées sur la parole). Une thérapie fondée sur la parole pourrait inclure un rendez-vous avec un conseiller, individuellement ou dans un groupe. Cela peut consister à noter vos pensées et vos sentiments dans un journal et en parler, à résoudre les problèmes, à vous fixer des objectifs et à recevoir un retour de commentaires sur l'auto-prise en charge. Cela peut aussi inclure des séances consacrées à la prise en charge de la douleur et à la relaxation ; et l'adaptation à la dépression. D'autres traitements non pharmacologiques ont été testés pour déterminer leur effet sur la fatigue chez les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde. Ils comprennent différents suppléments diététiques et des études sur les effets de l'accès par les personnes aux informations sur leur propre statut de la maladie. Ces traitements, s'ils sont corroborés par l'ensemble des données disponibles, devraient permettre au patient d'exercer un certain contrôle personnel sur sa fatigue.

Qu'arrive-t-il aux personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde qui utilisent des interventions non pharmacologiques ?

- À la fin de l'intervention, les personnes recevant une intervention témoin avaient un score moyen de 63 sur une échelle de 0 à 100, un score inférieur indiquant une fatigue moindre.

- Les personnes qui ont utilisé une activité physique ont noté leur fatigue à 54 sur une échelle de 0 à 100 à la fin de l'intervention, soit une note plus basse de 9 points que les personnes qui ont reçu l'intervention témoin.

- Les personnes qui ont participé à une intervention psychosociale ont noté leur fatigue à 57 sur une échelle de 0 à 100 à la fin de l'intervention, soit une note plus basse de 6 points que les personnes qui ont reçu l'intervention témoin.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.