Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Oral hygiene care for critically ill patients to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia

  1. Zongdao Shi1,
  2. Huixu Xie1,
  3. Ping Wang2,
  4. Qi Zhang3,
  5. Yan Wu4,
  6. E Chen5,
  7. Linda Ng6,
  8. Helen V Worthington7,
  9. Ian Needleman8,
  10. Susan Furness7,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 13 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 14 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008367.pub2


How to Cite

Shi Z, Xie H, Wang P, Zhang Q, Wu Y, Chen E, Ng L, Worthington HV, Needleman I, Furness S. Oral hygiene care for critically ill patients to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD008367. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008367.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  2. 2

    West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Department of Dental Implantation, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  3. 3

    West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Department of Oral Implantology, State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  4. 4

    Chongqing Medical University, Department of Orthodontics, Chongqing, China

  5. 5

    West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  6. 6

    University of Queensland, School of Nursing and Midwifery, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  7. 7

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Cochrane Oral Health Group, Manchester, UK

  8. 8

    UCL Eastman Dental Institute, Unit of Periodontology and International Centre for Evidence-Based Oral Healthcare, London, UK

*Susan Furness, Cochrane Oral Health Group, School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Coupland III Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. Susan.Furness@manchester.ac.uk. suefurness@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 13 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is defined as pneumonia developing in persons who have received mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours. VAP is a potentially serious complication in these patients who are already critically ill. Oral hygiene care (OHC), using either a mouthrinse, gel, toothbrush, or combination, together with aspiration of secretions may reduce the risk of VAP in these patients.

Objectives

To assess the effects of OHC on the incidence of VAP in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation in intensive care units (ICUs) in hospitals.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 14 January 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (OVID) (1946 to 14 January 2013), EMBASE (OVID) (1980 to 14 January 2013), LILACS (BIREME) (1982 to 14 January 2013), CINAHL (EBSCO) (1980 to 14 January 2013), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (1978 to 14 January 2013), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1994 to 14 January 2013), Wan Fang Database (January 1984 to 14 January 2013), OpenGrey and ClinicalTrials.gov (to 14 January 2013). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of OHC (mouthrinse, swab, toothbrush or combination) in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed all search results, extracted data and undertook risk of bias. We contacted study authors for additional information. Trials with similar interventions and outcomes were pooled reporting odds ratios (OR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes using random-effects models unless there were fewer than four studies.

Main results

Thirty-five RCTs (5374 participants) were included. Five trials (14%) were assessed at low risk of bias, 17 studies (49%) were at high risk of bias, and 13 studies (37%) were assessed at unclear risk of bias in at least one domain. There were four main comparisons: chlorhexidine (CHX mouthrinse or gel) versus placebo/usual care, toothbrushing versus no toothbrushing, powered versus manual toothbrushing and comparisons of oral care solutions.

There is moderate quality evidence from 17 RCTs (2402 participants, two at high, 11 at unclear and four at low risk of bias) that CHX mouthrinse or gel, as part of OHC, compared to placebo or usual care is associated with a reduction in VAP (OR 0.60, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.47 to 0.77, P < 0.001, I2 = 21%). This is equivalent to a number needed to treat (NNT) of 15 (95% CI 10 to 34) indicating that for every 15 ventilated patients in intensive care receiving OHC including chlorhexidine, one outcome of VAP will be prevented. There is no evidence of a difference between CHX and placebo/usual care in the outcomes of mortality (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.38, P = 0.44, I2 = 2%, 15 RCTs, moderate quality evidence), duration of mechanical ventilation (MD 0.09, 95% CI -0.84 to 1.01 days, P = 0.85, I2 = 24%, six RCTs, moderate quality evidence), or duration of ICU stay (MD 0.21, 95% CI -1.48 to 1.89 days, P = 0.81, I2 = 9%, six RCTs, moderate quality evidence). There was insufficient evidence to determine whether there is a difference between CHX and placebo/usual care in the outcomes of duration of use of systemic antibiotics, oral health indices, microbiological cultures, caregivers preferences or cost. Only three studies reported any adverse effects, and these were mild with similar frequency in CHX and control groups.

From three trials of children aged from 0 to 15 years (342 participants, moderate quality evidence) there is no evidence of a difference between OHC with CHX and placebo for the outcomes of VAP (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.77, P = 0.79, I2 = 0%), or mortality (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.41 to 1.30, P = 0.28, I2 = 0%), and insufficient evidence to determine the effect on the outcomes of duration of ventilation, duration of ICU stay, use of systemic antibiotics, plaque index, microbiological cultures or adverse effects, in children.

Based on four RCTs (828 participants, low quality evidence) there is no evidence of a difference between OHC including toothbrushing (± CHX) compared to OHC without toothbrushing (± CHX) for the outcome of VAP (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.29, P = 0.24 , I2 = 64%) and no evidence of a difference for mortality (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.16, P = 0.31, I2 = 0%, four RCTs, moderate quality evidence). There is insufficient evidence to determine whether there is a difference due to toothbrushing for the outcomes of duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of ICU stay, use of systemic antibiotics, oral health indices, microbiological cultures, adverse effects, caregivers preferences or cost.

Only one trial compared use of a powered toothbrush with a manual toothbrush providing insufficient evidence to determine the effect on any of the outcomes of this review.

A range of other oral care solutions were compared. There is some weak evidence that povidone iodine mouthrinse is more effective than saline in reducing VAP (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.65, P = 0.0009, I2 = 53%) (two studies, 206 participants, high risk of bias). Due to the variation in comparisons and outcomes among the trials in this group there is insufficient evidence concerning the effects of other oral care solutions on the outcomes of this review.

Authors' conclusions

Effective OHC is important for ventilated patients in intensive care. OHC that includes either chlorhexidine mouthwash or gel is associated with a 40% reduction in the odds of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill adults. However, there is no evidence of a difference in the outcomes of mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation or duration of ICU stay. There is no evidence that OHC including both CHX and toothbrushing is different from OHC with CHX alone, and some weak evidence to suggest that povidone iodine mouthrinse is more effective than saline in reducing VAP. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether powered toothbrushing or other oral care solutions are effective in reducing VAP.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Oral hygiene care for critically ill patients to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia

Review question

To assess the effects of oral hygiene care on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation in intensive care units (ICUs) in hospitals (excluding the use of antibiotics). The aim was to summarise all the available appropriate research in order to facilitate the provision of evidence-based care for these vulnerable patients.

Trials were grouped into four main comparisons.

1. Chlorhexidine antiseptic mouthrinse or gel compared to placebo (treatment without the active ingredient chlorhexidine) or usual care, (with or without toothbrushing).
2. Toothbrushing compared with no toothbrushing, (with or without chlorhexidine).
3. Powered compared with manual toothbrushing.
4. Oral care with other solutions.

Background

Critically ill people, who may be unconscious or sedated while they are treated in intensive care units often need to have machines to help them breathe (ventilators). The use of these machines for more than 48 hours may result in VAP. VAP is a potentially serious complication in these patients who are already critically ill.

Keeping the teeth and the mouth clean, preventing the build-up of plaque on the teeth, or secretions in the mouth may help reduce the risk of developing VAP. Oral hygiene care, using a mouthrinse, gel, toothbrush, or combination, together with aspiration of secretions may reduce the risk of VAP in these patients.

Study characteristics

This review of existing studies was carried out by the Cochrane Oral Health Group and the evidence is current up to 14 January 2013.

Thirty-five separate research studies were included but only a minority (14%) of the studies were well conducted and described.

All of the studies took place in intensive care units in hospitals. In total there were 5374 participants randomly allocated to treatment. Participants were critically ill and required assistance from nursing staff for their oral hygiene care. In three of the included studies participants were children and in the remaining studies only adults participated. Participants had been hospitalised as medical, surgical or trauma patients. In 13 studies it was not clear which of these three categories the participants belonged to.

Key results

Effective oral hygiene care is important for ventilated patients in intensive care. We found evidence that chlorhexidine either as a mouthrinse or a gel reduces the odds of VAP in adults by about 40%. So for example for every 15 people on ventilators in intensive care, the use of oral hygiene care including chlorhexidine will prevent one person developing VAP. However, we found no evidence that chlorhexidine makes a difference to the numbers of patients who die in ICU, to the number of days of mechanical ventilation or the number of days in ICU.

The three studies of children (aged birth to 15 years) showed no evidence of a difference in VAP between the use of chlorhexidine mouthrinse or gel and placebo in children.

Four studies showed no evidence of a difference between toothbrushing (with or without chlorhexidine) and oral care without toothbrushing (with or without chlorhexidine) in the risk of developing VAP. Two studies showed some evidence of a reduction in VAP with povidone iodine antiseptic mouthrinse.

There was not enough research information available to provide evidence of the effects of other mouth care rinses such as water, saline or triclosan.

Only two of the included studies reported any adverse effects of the interventions (mild oral irritation (one study) and unpleasant taste (both chlorhexidine and placebo)), four studies reported that there were no adverse effects and the remaining studies do not mention adverse effects in the reports.

Quality of the evidence

The evidence presented is of moderate quality. Only 14% of the studies were well conducted and described.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire chez des patients gravement malades pour prévenir tout risque de pneumonie sous ventilation assistée

Contexte

La pneumonie sous ventilation assistée (PVA) est une pneumonie qui se développe chez des personnes ayant été placées sous ventilation mécanique pendant au moins 48 heures. La PVA est une complication potentiellement grave chez ces patients qui sont déjà gravement malades. Des soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire (SHBD) utilisant ou combinant une solution de bain de bouche, un gel, une brosse à dent avec une aspiration des sécrétions, peuvent réduire les risques de PVA chez ces patients.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des SHBD sur l'incidence de la PVA chez des patients gravement malades placés sous ventilation mécanique en services de soins intensifs (SSI) hospitaliers.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 12), MEDLINE (OVID) (de 1946 jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), EMBASE (OVID) (de 1980 jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), LILACS (BIREME) (de 1982 jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), CINAHL (EBSCO) (de 1980 jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (de 1978 jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (de 1994 jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), Wan Fang Database (de janvier 1984 jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013), OpenGrey et ClinicalTrials.gov (jusqu'au 14 janvier 2013). Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date de publication.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) évaluant les effets de SHBD (solution de bain de bouche, compresse, brosse à dent ou combinés les uns aux autres) chez des patients gravement malades placés sous ventilation mécanique.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'ensemble des résultats des recherches, extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des études afin d'obtenir des informations complémentaires. Les essais contenant des interventions et des résultats similaires étaient regroupés et rapportaient des odds ratios (OR) pour les résultats dichotomiques et des différences moyennes (DM) pour les résultats continus en utilisant des modèles à effets aléatoires, sauf si le nombre d'études était inférieur à quatre.

Résultats Principaux

Trente-cinq ECR (5 374 participants) ont été inclus. Les risques de biais de cinq essais (14 %) étaient évalués comme étant faibles, ceux de 17 études (49 %) étaient évalués comme étant élevés et ceux de 13 études (37 %) étaient évalués comme étant indéterminés dans au moins un domaine. Il y avait quatre comparaisons principales : chlorhéxidine (solution de bain de bouche ou gel CHX) versus placebo/soins standard, brossage des dents versus absence de brossage de dents, brossage électrique des dents versus brossage manuel des dents et comparaisons de solutions de soins bucco-dentaires.

Il existe des preuves de qualité moyenne dans 17 ECR (2 402 participants, présentant des risques de biais élevés (2 ECR), indéterminés (11 ECR) et faibles (4 ECR)) selon lesquelles une solution de bain de bouche ou un gel CHX utilisé(e) dans le cadre de SHBD, comparé(e) à un placebo ou à des soins standard, est associé(e) à une diminution de la PVA (OR 0,60, intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,47 à 0,77, P < 0,001, I2 = 21 %). Soit un équivalent d'un nombre de sujets à traiter (NST) de 15 (IC à 95 % 10 à 34) indiquant que pour un groupe de 15 patients ventilés en soins intensifs et bénéficiant de SHBD à base de chlorhéxidine, un résultat de PVA sera évité. Il n'existe aucune preuve de différence entre la CHX et un placebo/soins standard pour les résultats concernant la mortalité (OR 1,10, IC à 95 % 0,87 à 1,38, P = 0,44, I2 = 2 %, 15 ECR, preuves de qualité moyenne), la durée de la ventilation mécanique (DM 0,09, IC à 95 % - 0,84 à 1,01 jours, P = 0,85, I2 = 24 %, six ECR, preuves de qualité moyenne) ou la durée d'hospitalisation en SSI (DM - 0,21, IC à 95 % - 1,48 à 1,89 jours, P = 0,81, I2 = 9 %, six ECR, preuves de qualité moyenne). Il y avait des preuves insuffisantes pour déterminer l'existence d'une différence entre la CHX et un placebo/soins standard pour les résultats concernant la durée du traitement antibiotique systémique, les indices de santé bucco-dentaire, les cultures microbiologiques, les préférences des soignants ou les coûts. Seules trois études rapportaient des effets indésirables et ces derniers étaient légers avec une fréquence similaire dans les groupes CHX et témoins.

Dans trois essais portant sur des enfants âgés de 0 à 15 ans (342 participants, preuves de qualité moyenne), il n'existe aucune preuve d'une différence entre des SHBD contenant de la CHX et un placebo pour les résultats concernant la PVA (OR 1,07, IC à 95 % 0,65 à 1,77, P = 0,79, I2 = 0 %) ou la mortalité (OR 0,73, IC à 95 % 0,41 à 1,30, P = 0,28, I2 = 0 %), ainsi que des preuves insuffisantes pour déterminer des effets sur les résultats concernant la durée de ventilation, la durée de l'hospitalisation en SSI, un traitement antibiotique systémique, l'indice de plaque dentaire, les cultures microbiologiques ou des effets indésirables chez l'enfant.

D'après quatre ECR (828 participants, preuves de qualité médiocre), il n'existe aucune preuve d'une différence entre des SHBD incluant un brossage des dents (± CHX) par rapport à des SHBD sans brossage des dents (± CHX) pour les résultats concernant la PVA (OR 0,69, IC à 95 % 0,36 à 1,29, P = 0,24, I2 = 64 %) et aucune preuve d'une différence au niveau de la mortalité (OR 0,85, IC à 95 % 0,62 à 1,16, P = 0,31, I2 = 0 %, quatre ECR, preuves de qualité moyenne). Il existe des preuves insuffisantes pour déterminer l'existence d'une différence avec un brossage des dents pour les résultats concernant la durée de la ventilation mécanique, la durée de l'hospitalisation en SSI, l'administration d'un traitement antibiotique systémique, les indices de santé bucco-dentaire, les cultures microbiologiques, les effets indésirables, les préférences des soignants ou les coûts.

Seul un essai comparait l'utilisation d'une brosse à dent électrique à une brosse à dents manuelle et fournissait des preuves insuffisantes pour déterminer les effets sur l'un des résultats de cette revue.

Un éventail d'autres solutions de soins bucco-dentaires ont été comparées. Il existe des preuves peu probantes selon lesquelles une solution de bain de bouche à base de povidone iodée serait plus efficace qu'une solution saline à réduire la PVA (OR 0,35, IC à 95 % 0,19 à 0,65, P = 0,0009, I2 = 53 %) (deux études, 206 participants, risques de biais élevés). En raison de la variation des comparaisons et des résultats entre les essais de ce groupe, il existe des preuves insuffisantes concernant les effets d'autres solutions de soins bucco-dentaires sur les résultats de cette revue.

Conclusions des auteurs

Des SHBD efficaces sont importants chez les patients ventilés placés en soins intensifs. Les SHBD incluant une solution de bain de bouche ou un gel à base de chlorhéxidine sont associés à une diminution de 40 % des risques de développer une pneumonie sous ventilation assistée chez des adultes gravement malades. Toutefois, il n'existe aucune preuve d'une différence pour les résultats concernant la mortalité, la durée de la ventilation mécanique ou la durée de l'hospitalisation en SSI. Il n'existe aucune preuve selon laquelle des SHBD incluant de la CHX et un brossage des dents seraient différents des SHBD uniquement composés de CHX et des preuves peu probantes suggèrent qu'une solution de bain de bouche à base de povidone iodée serait plus efficace qu'une solution saline à réduire la PVA. Il existe des preuves insuffisantes pour déterminer si un brossage électrique des dents ou des solutions de soins bucco-dentaire permettent de réduire la PVA.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire chez des patients gravement malades pour prévenir tout risque de pneumonie sous ventilation assistée

Soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire chez des patients gravement malades pour prévenir tout risque de pneumonie sous ventilation assistée

Question de la revue

Évaluer les effets des soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire sur l'incidence de la pneumonie sous ventilation assistée (PVA) chez des patients gravement malades placés sous ventilation mécanique en services de soins intensifs (SSI) hospitaliers (en excluant l'administration d'antibiotiques). L'objectif était de récapituler l'ensemble des recherches appropriées disponibles afin de faciliter la prestation de soins éprouvés destinés à ces patients vulnérables.

Les essais étaient regroupés sous la forme de quatre comparaisons principales.

1. Solution de bain de bouche ou gel antiseptique à base de chlorhéxidine comparé(e) à un placebo (traitement dépourvu de chlorhéxidine, son ingrédient actif) ou à des soins standard (avec ou sans brossage des dents).
2. Brossage des dents comparé à l'absence de brossage des dents (avec ou sans chlorhéxidine).
3. Brossage électrique des dents comparé à un brossage manuel des dents.
4. Soins bucco-dentaires comparés à d'autres solutions.

Contexte

Les personnes gravement malades, qui peuvent être inconscientes ou endormies pendant leur traitement en services de soins intensifs, doivent généralement disposer de machines d'assistance respiratoire (ventilateurs). Si elles sont utilisées pendant une durée supérieure à 48 heures, elles peuvent provoquer une PVA. Une PVA est une complication potentiellement grave touchant ces patients qui sont déjà gravement malades.

Une bonne hygiène bucco-dentaire, prévenant la formation de plaque dentaire ou de sécrétions buccales, peut réduire les risques de développer une PVA. Les soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire, utilisant une solution de bain de bouche ou un gel et/ou une brosse à dent associés à l'aspiration des sécrétions, peuvent réduire les risques de PVA chez ces patients.

Caractéristiques des études

Cette revue d'études existantes a été réalisée par le groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire et les preuves sont à jour à la date du 14 janvier 2013.

Trente-cinq études de recherches distinctes ont été incluses, mais seule une minorité (14 %) d'entre elles ont été correctement réalisées et décrites.

Toutes se sont déroulées dans des services de soins intensifs hospitaliers. Au total, 5 374 participants ont été aléatoirement assignés à un traitement. Ces derniers étaient gravement malades et nécessitaient une aide du personnel soignant pour leurs soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire. Dans trois des études incluses, les participants étaient des enfants et les études restantes étaient uniquement composées d'adultes. Les participants avaient été hospitalisés en tant que patients médicaux, chirurgicaux ou ayant subi des traumatismes. Dans 13 études, nous ignorions à laquelle de ces trois catégories appartenaient les participants.

Résultats principaux

Des soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire efficaces sont importants chez les patients ventilés placés en soins intensifs. Nous avons trouvé des preuves selon lesquelles la chlorhéxidine, sous la forme d'une solution de bain de bouche ou d'un gel, réduit d'environ 40 % les risques de PVA chez les adultes. Donc, par exemple, sur 15 personnes ventilées en soins intensifs, le recours à des soins d'hygiène bucco-dentaire incluant de la chlorhéxidine évitera à une personne de développer une PVA. Toutefois, nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve selon laquelle la chlorhéxidine apporte une réelle différence au niveau du nombre de patients décédant en services de soins intensifs (SSI), du nombre de jours de ventilation mécanique ou du nombre de jours passés en SSI.

Les trois études portant sur des enfants (âgés de 15 ans au maximum) ne montraient aucune preuve d'une différence en termes de PVA entre l'utilisation d'une solution de bain de bouche ou d'un gel et d'un placebo chez l'enfant.

Quatre études ne montraient aucune preuve d'une différence entre le brossage de dents (avec ou sans chlorhéxidine) et des soins bucco-dentaires sans brossage des dents (avec ou sans chlorhéxidine) concernant les risques de développer une PVA. Deux études montraient quelques preuves d'une diminution de la PVA avec une solution de bain de bouche antiseptique à base de povidone iodée.

Il n'y avait pas suffisamment d'informations de recherche disponibles pour fournir des preuves concernant les effets d'autres solutions de rinçage bucco-dentaire comme l'eau, une solution saline ou le triclosan.

Seules deux des études incluses rapportaient des effets indésirables des interventions (irritation orale légère (une étude) et goût désagréable (chlorhéxidine et placebo)), quatre études rapportaient qu'il n'y avait aucun effet indésirable et les études restantes ne mentionnaient aucun effet indésirable dans les rapports.

Qualité des preuves

Les preuves présentées sont de qualité moyenne. Seules 14 % des études étaient correctement réalisées et décrites.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 24th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.