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Intervention Protocol

Tricyclic antidepressants for autism spectrum disorder

  1. Romy Hurwitz1,*,
  2. Roger Blackmore2,
  3. Philip Hazell3,
  4. Katrina Williams4,
  5. Susan Woolfenden5,
  6. Danielle M Wheeler6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 17 FEB 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008372


How to Cite

Hurwitz R, Blackmore R, Hazell P, Williams K, Woolfenden S, Wheeler DM. Tricyclic antidepressants for autism spectrum disorder (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD008372. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008372.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Sydney Children's Hospital, Developmental Paediatrics and Community Child Health, Randwick, NSW, Australia

  2. 2

    Liverpool Hospital, Community Paediatrics, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  3. 3

    Thomas Walker Hospital (Rivendell) Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health Services, Concord West, Australia

  4. 4

    University of New South Wales & Sydney Children's Hospital, School of Women's and Children's Health, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  5. 5

    Liverpool Hospital, B Wing, Liverpool, NSW, Australia

  6. 6

    Randwick, Australia

*Romy Hurwitz, Developmental Paediatrics and Community Child Health, Sydney Children's Hospital, Tumbatin Clinic/Community Health Centre, Corner Avoca and Barker Street, Randwick, NSW, 2031, Australia. hurwie@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 17 FEB 2010

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

To evaluate the use of tricyclic antidepressants in people with autism spectrum disorders. The objectives are to determine if treatment with tricyclic antidepressants:

  1. improves the core features of autism, including restricted social interaction, restricted communication and stereotypical and repetitive behaviours;
  2. improves non-core features such as challenging behaviours;
  3. improves co-morbid states, such as depression and anxiety; and
  4. causes adverse effects.