Intervention Review

Orthodontic treatment for distalising upper first molars in children and adolescents

  1. Safa Jambi1,2,*,
  2. Badri Thiruvenkatachari3,
  3. Kevin D O'Brien3,
  4. Tanya Walsh3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 23 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008375.pub2

How to Cite

Jambi S, Thiruvenkatachari B, O'Brien KD, Walsh T. Orthodontic treatment for distalising upper first molars in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD008375. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008375.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Manchester, School of Dentistry, Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    Taiba University, Medina, Saudi Arabia

  3. 3

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK

*Safa Jambi, safajambi@yahoo.co.uk. safa.jambi-2@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

When orthodontic treatment is provided with fixed appliances, it is sometimes necessary to move the upper molar teeth backwards (distalise) to create space or help to overcome anchorage requirements. This can be achieved with the use of extraoral or intraoral appliances. The most common appliance is extraoral headgear, which requires considerable patient co-operation. Further, reports of serious injuries have been published. Intraoral appliances have been developed to overcome such shortcomings. The comparative effects of extraoral and intraoral appliances have not been fully evaluated.

Objectives

To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for distalising upper first molars in children and adolescents.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 10 December 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 11), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 10 December 2012) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 10 December 2012). No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases.

Selection criteria

Randomised clinical trials involving the use of removable or fixed orthodontic appliances intended to distalise upper first molars in children and adolescents.

Data collection and analysis

We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We performed data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias independently and in duplicate. We contacted authors to clarify the inclusion criteria of the studies.

Main results

Ten studies, reporting data from 354 participants, were included in this review, the majority of which were carried out in a university dental hospital setting. The studies were published between 2005 and 2011 and were conducted in Europe and in Brazil. The age range of participants was from nine to 15 years, with an even distribution of males and females in seven of the studies, and a slight predominance of female patients in three of the studies. The quality of the studies was generally poor; seven studies were at an overall high risk of bias, three studies were at an unclear risk of bias, and we judged no study to be at low risk of bias.

We carried out random-effects meta-analyses as appropriate for the primary clinical outcomes of movement of upper first molars (mm), and loss of anterior anchorage, where there were sufficient data reported in the primary studies. Four studies, involving 159 participants, compared a distalising appliance to an untreated control. Meta-analyses were not undertaken for all primary outcomes due to incomplete reporting of all summary statistics, expected outcomes, and differences between the types of appliances. The degree and direction of molar movement and loss of anterior anchorage varied with the type of appliance. Four studies, involving 150 participants, compared a distalising appliance versus headgear. The mean molar movement for intraoral distalising appliances was -2.20 mm and -1.04 mm for headgear. There was a statistically significant difference in mean distal molar movement (mean difference (MD) -1.45 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.74 to -0.15) favouring intraoral appliances compared to headgear (four studies, high or unclear risk of bias, 150 participants analysed). However, a statistically significant difference in mean mesial upper incisor movement (MD 1.82 mm; 95% CI 1.39 to 2.24) and overjet (fixed-effect: MD 1.64 mm; 95% CI 1.26 to 2.02; two studies, unclear risk of bias, 70 participants analysed) favoured headgear, i.e. there was less loss of anterior anchorage with headgear. We reported direct comparisons of intraoral appliances narratively due to the variation in interventions (three studies, high or unclear risk of bias, 93 participants randomised). All appliances were reported to provide some degree of distal movement, and loss of anterior anchorage varied with the type of appliance.

No included studies reported on the incidence of adverse effects (harm, injury), number of attendances or rate of non-compliance.

Authors' conclusions

It is suggested that intraoral appliances are more effective than headgear in distalising upper first molars. However, this effect is counteracted by loss of anterior anchorage, which was not found to occur with headgear when compared with intraoral distalising appliance in a small number of studies. The number of trials assessing the effects of orthodontic treatment for distilisation is low, and the current evidence is of low or very low quality.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Orthodontic treatment with appliances which move the upper molar teeth backwards 

Review question

The main question addressed by this review is how effective are orthodontic appliances in moving the upper teeth backwards in children and adolescents.

Background

Orthodontic treatment is a type of dental care that corrects crooked or sticking out teeth by moving the teeth into different positions. When orthodontic treatment is provided with braces it is sometimes necessary to move the upper molar teeth backwards (distalise). This is achieved by special types of braces (appliances) that are placed either before or at the same time as the normal braces. Appliances which move the upper molar teeth backwards can be placed inside the mouth (intraoral appliance) or attached to the back of the head (extraoral appliance). The most commonly used extraoral appliance is headgear. The biggest disadvantage of headgear is that children and adolescents must wear it for prolonged hours during the day. In addition, serious eye injuries have been reported while wearing headgear. As an alternative, several intraoral appliances have been developed. Unfortunately, their effects have not been completely evaluated.

Study characteristics

This review of existing studies was carried out by the Cochrane Oral Health Group, and the evidence is current as of December 2012. In this review there are 10 studies published between 2005 and 2011 in which a total of 354 children were randomised to receive treatment with a distalising orthodontic appliance and compared to either no treatment, headgear or another distalising appliance. The age range of children in nine of the studies was from 11 to 15 years, although the children recruited to one study were younger, from nine to 10 years old. Both girls and boys participated in the studies.

Where it was mentioned, the funding was from a university or dental research foundation. The authors did not assess the impact of the funding sources.

Key results

When intraoral appliances are compared to headgear they will probably move the upper molar teeth backwards more than headgear. However, the use of intraoral appliances was also associated with movement of the upper front teeth when compared to extraoral appliances in four studies. This is an unwanted effect that was not observed with the use of the headgear appliances.

Harm, injury from the appliances and other characteristics of the appliances which may be important to patients were not reported in the studies.

Quality of the evidence

The evidence presented is generally of low quality. The main shortcomings were related to trial design.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement orthodontique pour la distilisation des premières molaires supérieures chez les enfants et les adolescents

Contexte

Le traitement orthodontique est parfois administré sous forme d'appareils fixes pour déplacer les molaires supérieures vers l’arrière (distilisation) et créer de l’espace ou aider à surmonter les ancrages. Cela peut être obtenu avec l'utilisation d’appareils intra-buccaux ou extra-buccaux. L’appareil extra-buccal le plus couramment utilisé est le casque, qui nécessite une coopération considérable des patients. De plus, des rapports de blessures sévères ont été publiés. Les appareils intra-buccaux ont été développés pour surmonter ces lacunes. Les effets comparatifs des appareils intra-buccaux et extra-buccaux n'ont pas pleinement été évalués.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets du traitement orthodontique pour la distilisation des premières molaires supérieures chez les enfants et les adolescents

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes : le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu' au 10 décembre 2012), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) ( La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2012, numéro 11), MEDLINE via OVID (de 1946 au 10 décembre 2012) et EMBASE via OVID (de 1980 au 10 décembre 2012). Aucune restriction n'a été appliquée concernant la langue ou la date de publication lors de la consultation des bases de données électroniques.

Critères de sélection

Les essais cliniques randomisés portant sur l'utilisation d'appareils orthodontiques fixes ou amovibles pour la distilisation des premières molaires supérieures chez les enfants et les adolescents.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons utilisé la procédure méthodologique standard prévue par la Collaboration Cochrane. Nous avons extrait des données et évalué le risque de biais de manière indépendante et en double. Nous avons contacté les auteurs afin de clarifier les critères d'inclusion des études.

Résultats Principaux

Dix études, rapportant des données de 354 participants, ont été incluses dans cette revue, la majorité d'entre elles était réalisée dans des cliniques universitaires de chirurgie dentaire. Les études ont été publiées entre 2005 et 2011 et ont été réalisées en Europe et au Brésil. Les participants étaient âgés de 9 à 15 ans, avec un nombre égal de garçons et de filles dans sept études et une légère prédominance des patients de sexe féminin dans trois des études. La qualité des études était généralement médiocre; sept études étaient à risque de biais global élevé, trois études présentaient un risque de biais incertain, et nous n’avons jugé aucune étude à faible risque de biais.

Lorsqu’ il n'y avait pas suffisamment de données rapportées dans les études originales, nous avons effectué des méta-analyses à effets aléatoires de façon appropriée pour les principaux critères de jugement cliniques concernant le mouvement des premières molaires supérieures (mm) et la perte d’ancrage antérieure. Quatre études, impliquant 159 participants, comparaient un appareil de distilisation à une absence de traitement. La méta-analyse n'a pas été effectuée pour tous les principaux critères de jugement en raison d'une notification incomplète de l’ensemble des statistiques de synthèse, des critères de jugement attendus et des différences entre les types d'appareils. Le degré et la direction des mouvements des molaires, ainsi que la perte d’ancrage antérieure, variaient selon le type d’appareil. Quatre études, impliquant 150 participants, comparaient un appareil de distilisation avec le casque. La moyenne du mouvement molaire avec les appareils de distilisation intra-buccaux était de -2,20 mm et de -1,04 mm avec le casque. Il y avait une différence statistiquement significative au niveau de la moyenne du mouvement molaire distal (différence moyenne (DM) -1,45 mm; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% -2,74 à -0,15) en faveur des appareils intra-buccaux par rapport au casque (quatre études, un risque de biais élevé ou incertain, 150 participants analysés). Cependant, une différence statistiquement significative au niveau de la moyenne du mouvement des incisives supérieures (DM 1,82 mm; IC à 95% 1,39 à 2,24) et d’overjet (effets fixes: DM 1,64 mm; IC à 95% 1,26 à 2,02; deux études, risque de biais incertain, 70 participants analysés) privilégiait le casque, par exemple, il y avait moins de perte d’ancrage antérieure avec le casque. Nous avons rapporté des comparaisons directes entre les appareils intra-buccaux de manière narrative en raison de la variation des interventions (trois études, un risque de biais élevé ou incertain, 93 participants randomisés). Tous les appareils buccaux fournissaient un certain degré de mouvement distal, et la perte d’ancrage antérieure variait selon le type d’appareil.

Aucune des études incluses n'avait rendu compte de l'incidence des effets indésirables (effets délétères, blessure), du nombre de consultations ou du taux de non-observance.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les appareils buccaux intra-buccaux sont vraisemblablement plus efficaces que le casque pour la distilisation des premières molaires supérieures. Cependant, dans un petit nombre d'études, cet effet est controversé par la perte d’ancrage antérieure qui ne survenait pas avec le casque lorsque comparé aux appareils de distilisation intra-buccaux. Le nombre d'essais évaluant les effets du traitement orthodontique pour la distilisation est faible et les preuves actuelles sont de qualité faible ou très faible.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement orthodontique pour la distilisation des premières molaires supérieures chez les enfants et les adolescents

Traitement orthodontique avec des appareils buccaux qui déplacent les molaires supérieures vers l’arrière

Question de la revue

La principale question examinée dans cette revue concerne l'efficacité des appareils orthodontiques pour déplacer les dents supérieures vers l’arrière chez les enfants et les adolescents.

Contexte

Le traitement orthodontique est un type de soins dentaire qui corrige les dents mal alignées ou trop avancées en les déplaçant dans différentes positions. Un appareil dentaire peut être utilisé lors de traitement orthodontique pour déplacer les molaires supérieures vers l’arrière (distilisation). Cela est effectué par des types d’appareils dentaires spéciaux (appareils buccaux) qui sont placés, soit avant, soit en même temps que les appareils dentaires ordinaires. Les appareils buccaux, qui déplacent les molaires supérieures vers l’arrière, peuvent être placés à l'intérieur de la bouche (appareil intra-buccal) ou fixées à l'arrière de la tête (appareil extra-buccal). L’appareil extra-buccal le plus couramment utilisé est le casque. Le plus grand inconvénient des casques est que les enfants et les adolescents doivent le porter pendant plusieurs heures durant la journée. De plus, des blessures oculaires sévères ont été rapportées suite au port du casque. Comme alternative, plusieurs appareils intra-buccaux ont été développés. Malheureusement, leurs effets n'ont pas été entièrement évalués.

> Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Cette revue des études existantes a été effectuée par le registre du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire et les preuves sont à jour en décembre 2012. Dans cette revue, il y a 10 études publiées entre 2005 et 2011 parmi lesquelles 354 enfants était randomisés pour recevoir un traitement avec un appareil orthodontique de distilisation, comparé à l'absence de traitement, le port d’un casque, ou autre dispositif de distilisation. Dans neuf des études, les enfants étaient âgés de 11 à 15 ans, mais dans une étude, les enfants étaient plus jeunes, de 9 à 10 ans. Des filles et des garçons ont participé aux études.

Lorsque cela était mentionné, le financement provenait d’une université ou d’une fondation de la recherche en hygiène dentaire. Les auteurs n'ont pas évalué l'impact des sources de financement.

Résultats principaux

Lorsque les appareils intra-buccaux sont comparés aux casques, ils déplacent probablement les molaires supérieures plus vers l’arrière que les casques. Cependant, dans quatre études, l'utilisation d'appareils intra-buccaux était également associée à la mobilité des dents avant supérieures par rapport aux appareils extra-buccaux. Ceci est un effet indésirable qui n'était pas observé avec l'utilisation de casques.

Les effets délétères, les lésions et d'autres caractéristiques dus aux appareils buccaux, qui pourraient être important pour les patients, n’étaient pas rapportés dans les études.

Qualité des preuves

Les preuves présentées sont généralement de faible qualité. Les principales limitations étaient liées à leur plan d'étude.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�