Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions for helping people adhere to compression treatments for venous leg ulceration

  1. Carolina D Weller1,*,
  2. Rachelle Buchbinder2,
  3. Renea V Johnston2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Wounds Group

Published Online: 6 SEP 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008378.pub2


How to Cite

Weller CD, Buchbinder R, Johnston RV. Interventions for helping people adhere to compression treatments for venous leg ulceration. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD008378. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008378.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Monash University, Dept of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

  2. 2

    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Cabrini Hospital, Malvern, Victoria, Australia

*Carolina D Weller, Dept of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, The Alfred Centre, Commercial Rd, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. carolina.weller@monash.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 6 SEP 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Chronic venous ulcer healing is a complex clinical problem that requires intervention from skilled, costly, multidisciplinary wound-care teams. Compression therapy has been shown to help heal venous ulcers and to reduce the risk of recurrence. It is not known which interventions help people adhere to compression treatments.

Objectives

To assess the benefits and harms of interventions designed to help people adhere to venous leg ulcer compression therapy, and thus improve healing of venous leg ulcers and prevent their recurrence after healing.

Search methods

In May 2013 we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; EBSCO CINAHL; trial registries, and reference lists of relevant publications for published and ongoing trials. There were no language or publication date restrictions.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions that help people with venous leg ulcers adhere to compression treatments compared with usual care, or no intervention, or another active intervention. Our main outcomes were number of people with ulcers healed, recurrence, time to complete healing, quality of life, pain, adherence to compression therapy and number of people with adverse events.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias of each included trial, and assessed overall quality of evidence for the main outcomes in 'Summary of findings' tables.

Main results

Low quality evidence from one trial (67 participants) indicates that, compared with home-based care, a community-based Leg Club® clinic that provided mechanisms for peer-support, assistance with goal setting and social interaction did not result in superior healing rates at three months (12/28 people healed in Leg Club clinic group versus 7/28 in home-based care group; risk ratio (RR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 3.71); or six months (15/33 healed in Leg Club group versus 10/34 in home-based care group; RR 1.55, 95% CI 0.81 to 2.93); or in improved quality of life outcomes at six months (MD 0.85 points, 95% CI -0.13 to 1.83; 0 to 10 point scale). However, the Leg Club resulted in a statistically significant reduction in pain at six months (MD -12.75 points, 95% CI -24.79, -0.71; 0 to 100 point scale), although this was not considered a clinically important difference. Time to complete healing, recurrence of ulcers, adherence and adverse events were not reported.

Low quality evidence from another trial (184 participants) indicates that, compared with usual care in a wound clinic, a community-based and nurse-led self-management programme of six months' duration promoting physical activity (walking and leg exercises) and adherence to compression therapy via counselling and behaviour modification (Lively Legs®) may not result in superior healing rates at 18 months (51/92 healed in Lively Legs group versus 41/92 in usual care group; RR 1.24 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.67)); may not result in reduced rates of recurrence of venous leg ulcers at 18 months (32/69 with recurrence in Lively Legs group versus 38/67 in usual care group; RR 0.82 (95% CI 0.59 to 1.14)); and may not result in superior adherence to compression therapy at 18 months (42/92 people fully adherent in Lively Legs group versus 41/92 in usual care group; RR 1.02 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.41)). Time to complete healing, quality of life, pain and adverse events were not reported. We found no studies that investigated other interventions to promote adherence to compression therapy.

Authors' conclusions

There is a paucity of trials of interventions that promote adherence to compression therapy for venous ulcers. Low quality evidence from two trials was identified: one promoting adherence via socialisation and support (Leg Club®), and the other promoting adherence to compression, leg exercises and walking via counselling and behaviour modification (Lively Legs®).These trials did not reveal a benefit of community-based clinics over usual care in terms of healing rates, prevention of recurrence of venous leg ulcers, or quality of life. One trial indicated a small, but possibly clinically unimportant, reduction in pain, while adverse events were not reported. The small number of participants may have a hidden real benefit, or an increase in harm. Due to the lack of reliable evidence, at present it is not possible either to recommend or discourage nurse clinic care interventions over standard care.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions for helping people adhere to compression bandages to aid healing of venous leg ulcers

Venous leg ulcers take weeks - or months - to heal, cause distress, and are very costly for health services. Although compression, using bandages or stockings, helps healing and prevents recurrence, many people do not adhere to compression therapy. Therefore, interventions that promote the wearing of compression should improve healing, and prevent recurrence of venous ulcers.

We found two studies of low quality evidence, so further studies may change the review findings.  

Leg Club®, a community-based clinic, may not significantly improve healing of venous leg ulcers or quality of life more than nurse home-visit care does, but probably results in less pain after six months.  Seventeen more people out of 100 were healed after participating in Leg Club (46/100 people in Leg Club healed compared with 29/100 people having usual home care). Leg Club participants rated their quality of life 0.85 points better than those receiving home care, assessed on a 10 point scale. Leg Club participants rated their pain at six months 12.75 points lower than the home care group, assessed on a 100 point scale. This trial did not report whether Leg Club clinics improve adherence to compression, time to healing, or prevent recurrence more than home care.

Lively Legs®, a community-based self-management programme, may not significantly improve healing of ulcers or decrease recurrence after 18 months any more than usual care in a wound clinic. Ten more people out of 100 were healed at 18 months after participating in Lively Legs (55/100 Lively Legs participants healed versus 45/100 people having usual care). Ten fewer people out of 100 had a recurrent leg ulcer 18 months after participating in Lively Legs (47/100 Lively Legs participants had recurrence compared with  57/100 people having usual care). The same number of people adhered to compression therapy after participating in Lively Legs (45/100 participants in both groups). The trial did not report whether the Lively Legs self-management programme clinics improve time to healing of ulcers, reduce pain, or improve quality of life any more than usual care in a wound clinic.

We found no studies investigating other potential interventions, such as education programs. We know that compression therapy is effective, but do not know which interventions improve adherence to compression therapy.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les interventions pour aider les personnes à l'observance des traitements de contention pour l'ulcère veineux de jambe

Contexte

La cicatrisation des ulcères veineux chroniques est un problème clinique complexe qui demande l'intervention d'équipesqualifiées, coûteuses et multidisciplinaires. Il a été démontré que le traitement compressif aide à guérir les ulcères veineux et réduit le risque de récidive. On ne sait pas quelles sont les interventions qui aident les gens à adhérer au traitement compressif.

Objectifs

Évaluer les bénéfices et inconvénients des interventions conçues pour aider les personnes à adhérer au traitement compressif des ulcères veineux de jambe et ainsi améliorer la cicatrisation des ulcères veineux de jambe et prévenir leur récidive après la guérison.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En mai 2013 nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les plaies et contusions; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; EBSCO CINAHL; dans les registres d'essais, et les références bibliographiques des publications pertinentes pour trouver des essais publiés et en cours. Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date de publication.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) d'interventions visant à aider les personnes présentant des ulcères veineux de jambe à adhérer aux traitements de contention par rapport aux soins habituels, ou à l'absence d'intervention, ou à une autre intervention active. Nos critères de jugement principaux étaient le nombre de personnes dont les ulcères avaient cicatrisé, la récidive, le temps jusqu' à cicatrisation complète, la qualité de vie, la douleur, l'observance du traitement compressif et le nombre de personnes avec des événements indésirables.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment sélectionné les études à inclure, extrait les données, évalué le risque de biais de chaque essai inclus et évalué la qualité globale des preuves pour les principaux critères de jugement dans des tableaux «Résumé des résultats».

Résultats Principaux

Des preuves de faible qualité issues d'un essai (67 participants) indiquent , en comparaison avec les soins à domicile, qu'une consultation communautaire, Leg Club®, fournissant des méthodes pour s'entraider , une aide pour fixer des objectifs et de l'interaction sociale n'a pas entraîné de meilleurs taux de guérison à trois mois (12/28 des personnes ont cicatrisé dans le groupe de consultation Leg Club versus 7/28 dans le groupe de soins à domicile; risque relatif (RR)1,71; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 0,79 à 3,71); ni à six mois (15/33 ont cicatrisé dans le groupe Leg Club versus 10/34 dans le groupe de soins à domicile; RR 1,55, IC à 95% 0,81 à 2,93); ni ne résultait en une amélioration de la qualité de vie à six mois (DM de 0,85 points, IC à 95% -0,13 à 1,83; échelle de 0 à 10 points). Cependant, le Leg Club entraînait une réduction statistiquement significative de la douleur à six mois (DM -12.75 points, IC à 95% -24.79, -0,71; échelle de 0 à 100), bien que cela n'a pas été considéré comme une différence cliniquement importante. Le temps jusqu' à cicatrisation complète, la récurrence des ulcères, l'observance et les événements indésirables n'étaient pas rapportés.

Des preuves de faible qualité issues d'un autre essai (184 participants) indiquent que, par rapport aux soins habituels dans une consultation spécialisée dans le traitement des plaies, un programme d'auto-prise en charge communautaire conduit par une infirmière d'une durée de six mois, encourageant l'activité physique (la marche et les exercices de la jambe) et l'adhésion au traitement compressif par le conseil et la modification comportementale (Lively Legs®) peut ne pas entraîner de meilleurs taux de guérison à 18 mois (51/92 ont cicatrisé dans le groupe Lively Legs® versus 41/92 dans le groupe de soins habituels; RR de 1,24 (IC à 95% 0,93 à 1,67)); peut ne pas entraîner une réduction du taux de récurrence des ulcères veineux de jambe à 18 mois (32/69 ont eu une récurrence dans le groupe Lively Legs versus 38/67 dans le groupe de soins habituels; RR 0,82 (IC à 95% 0,59 à 1,14)); et peut ne pas entraîner une meilleure adhésion au traitement compressif à 18 mois (42/92 personnes totalement adhérentes dans le groupe Lively Legs versus 41/92 dans le groupe de soins habituels; RR de 1,02 (IC à 95% 0,74 à 1,41)). Le temps jusqu' à cicatrisation complète, la qualité de vie, la douleur et les événements indésirables n'étaient pas rapportés. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune étude examinant d'autres interventions visant à promouvoir l'observance au traitement compressif.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe un manque d'essais d'interventions visant à promouvoir l'observance au traitement compressif pour les ulcères veineux. Des preuves de faible qualité issues de deux essais ont été identifiées: l'un encourageant l'observance par la socialisation et le soutien (Leg Club®), et l'autre encourageant l'observance de la compression, les exercices de la jambe et la marche par le conseil et la modification comportementale (Lively Legs®).Ces essais n'ont pas mis en évidence un bénéfice des consultations communautaires par rapport aux soins habituels en termes de taux de guérison, de prévention de la récurrence des ulcères veineux de jambe ou de la qualité de vie. Un essai a montré un petite, mais possiblement peu importante sur le plan clinique, réduction de la douleur, alors que les événements indésirables n'étaient pas rapportés. Le petit nombre de participants peut avoir caché un réel bénéfice, ou une augmentation des effets indésirables. En raison, à l'heure actuelle, de l'absence de preuves fiables, il n'est pas possible ni de recommander ni de déconseiller les interventions de soins en lieux de soins animés par des infirmières par rapport à des soins ordinaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les interventions pour aider les personnes à l'observance des traitements de contention pour l'ulcère veineux de jambe

Les interventions pour aider les personnes à adhérer aux bandages de contention pour favoriser la cicatrisation des ulcères veineux de jambe

Les ulcères veineux de jambe - prennent des semaines ou des mois à guérir, provoquent beaucoup de peine, et sont très coûteux pour les services de santé. Bien que la compression, au moyen de bandages ou de bas de contention, favorise la guérison et prévient la récidive, de nombreuses personnes n'observent pas le traitement par compression. Par conséquent, les interventions visant à promouvoir le port d'une contention devraient améliorer la cicatrisation, et prévenir la récurrence des ulcères veineux.

Nous avons trouvé deux études portant sur des preuves de faible qualité, de sorte que d'autres études pourraient modifier les résultats de cette revue.

Le Leg Club®, une consultation communautaire, n'améliore peut-être pas la cicatrisation des ulcères veineux de jambe ou la qualité de vie plus que ne le font des soins infirmiers à domicile , mais il entraîne probablement moins de douleur après six mois. Dix sept personnes supplémentaires sur 100 ont été guéries après avoir participé à un Leg Club (46/100 des personnes en Leg Club ont cicatrisé par rapport à 29/100 des personnes recevant des soins habituels à domicile). Les participants au Leg Club ont évalué leur qualité de vie à 0,85 points de plus que ceux recevant des soins à domicile, évaluée sur une échelle de 10 points. Les participants au Leg Club ont évalué leur douleur au bout de six mois à 12.75 points de moins que le groupe de soins à domicile, évaluée sur une échelle de 100 points. Cet essai n'a pas documenté si les consultations Leg Club amélioraient l'observance de la compression, le temps de cicatrisation, ou la prévention de la récidive plus que les soins à domicile.

Il est possible que Lively Legs®, un programme d'auto-prise en charge communautaire, n'améliore pas significativement plus la cicatrisation des ulcères ni ne diminue leur récurrence après 18 mois que ne le font les soins habituels délivrés dans une consultation spécialisée dans le traitement des plaies. Dix personnes supplémentaires sur 100 ont été guéries au bout de 18 mois après leur participation à Lively Legs (55/100 des participants à Lively Legs ont guéri versus 45/100 des personnes recevant des soins habituels). Dix personnes en moins sur 100 ont eu une récidive de l'ulcère de jambe 18 mois après leur participation à Lively Legs (47/100 des participants à Lively Legs ont récidivé en comparaison des 57/100 personnes recevant des soins habituels). Le même nombre de personnes ont observé le traitement compressif après avoir participé à Lively Legs (45/100 participants dans les deux groupes). L'essai n'a pas indiqué si le programme d'auto-prise en charge des consultations Lively Legs améliorait le temps de cicatrisation des ulcères, réduisait la douleur ou améliorait la qualité de vie plus que les soins habituels d'une consultation spécialisée dans le traitement des plaies.

Nous n'avons trouvé aucune étude examinant d'autres interventions potentielles, comme des programmes éducatifs. Nous savons que le traitement compressif est efficace mais nous ne savons pas quelles sont les interventions qui en améliorent l'observance.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th December, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�