Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage

  1. Charlie SY Chung1,*,
  2. Alex Pollock2,
  3. Tanya Campbell3,
  4. Brian R Durward4,
  5. Suzanne Hagen2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Stroke Group

Published Online: 30 APR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 23 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008391.pub2


How to Cite

Chung CSY, Pollock A, Campbell T, Durward BR, Hagen S. Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD008391. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008391.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    NHS Fife, Department of Occupational Therapy, Kirkcaldy, Fife, UK

  2. 2

    Glasgow Caledonian University, Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow, UK

  3. 3

    Glasgow Caledonian University, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Social Care, Glasgow, UK

  4. 4

    NHS Education for Scotland, Edinburgh, UK

*Charlie SY Chung, Department of Occupational Therapy, NHS Fife, Ward 12 (Stroke Unit), Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy, Fife, KY2 5AH, UK. chungsongyau@aol.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 APR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Executive functions are the controlling mechanisms of the brain and include the processes of planning, initiation, organisation, inhibition, problem solving, self monitoring and error correction. They are essential for goal-oriented behaviour and responding to new and novel situations. A high number of people with acquired brain injury, including around 75% of stroke survivors, will experience executive dysfunction. Executive dysfunction reduces capacity to regain independence in activities of daily living (ADL), particularly when alternative movement strategies are necessary to compensate for limb weakness. Improving executive function may lead to increased independence with ADL. There are various cognitive rehabilitation strategies for training executive function used within clinical practice and it is necessary to determine the effectiveness of these interventions.

Objectives

To determine the effects of cognitive rehabilitation on executive dysfunction for adults with stroke or other non-progressive acquired brain injuries.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (August 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, August 2012), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2012), EMBASE (1980 to August 2012), CINAHL (1982 to August 2012), PsycINFO (1806 to August 2012), AMED (1985 to August 2012) and 11 additional databases. We also searched reference lists and trials registers, handsearched journals and conference proceedings, and contacted experts.

Selection criteria

We included randomised trials in adults after non-progressive acquired brain injury, where the intervention was specifically targeted at improving cognition including separable executive function data (restorative interventions), where the intervention was aimed at training participants in methods to compensate for lost executive function (compensative interventions) or where the intervention involved the training in the use of an adaptive technique for improving independence with ADL (adaptive interventions). The primary outcome was global executive function and the secondary outcomes were specific components of executive function, working memory, ADL, extended ADL, quality of life and participation in vocational activities. We included studies in which the comparison intervention was no treatment, a placebo intervention (i.e. a rehabilitation intervention that should not impact on executive function), standard care or another cognitive rehabilitation intervention.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently screened abstracts, extracted data and appraised trials. We undertook an assessment of methodological quality for allocation concealment, blinding of outcome assessors, method of dealing with missing data and other potential sources of bias.

Main results

Nineteen studies (907 participants) met the inclusion criteria for this review. We included 13 studies (770 participants) in meta-analyses (417 traumatic brain injury, 304 stroke, 49 other acquired brain injury) reducing to 660 participants once non-included intervention groups were removed from three and four group studies. We were unable to obtain data from the remaining six studies. Three studies (134 participants) compared cognitive rehabilitation with sensorimotor therapy. None reported our primary outcome; data from one study was available relating to secondary outcomes including concept formation and ADL. Six studies (333 participants) compared cognitive rehabilitation with no treatment or placebo. None reported our primary outcome; data from four studies demonstrated no statistically significant effect of cognitive rehabilitation on secondary outcomes. Ten studies (448 participants) compared two different cognitive rehabilitation approaches. Two studies (82 participants) reported the primary outcome; no statistically significant effect was found. Data from eight studies demonstrated no statistically significant effect on the secondary outcomes. We explored the effect of restorative interventions (10 studies, 468 participants) and compensative interventions (four studies, 128 participants) and found no statistically significant effect compared with other interventions.

Authors' conclusions

We identified insufficient high-quality evidence to reach any generalised conclusions about the effect of cognitive rehabilitation on executive function, or other secondary outcome measures. Further high-quality research comparing cognitive rehabilitation with no intervention, placebo or sensorimotor interventions is recommended.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Cognitive rehabilitation for executive function problems after brain injury

Executive function is the term used to describe the brain processes that we use to organise ourselves and solve problems. Executive function is frequently affected when the brain is damaged through trauma or from an internal cause such as a stroke. It has been estimated that around 75% of people will have executive function difficulties after a stroke. People with executive function difficulties (executive dysfunction) often find it difficult to learn new ways of doing daily activities, such as dressing themselves. This can make it very difficult for them to learn ways to deal with other problems, such as movement difficulties, which also occur as a result of their brain injury. Cognitive rehabilitation is a type of therapy that aims to improve people's attention, memory or executive function. If it is possible to improve executive function, then more people with brain injury might become more independent with activities of daily living, and might respond better to their rehabilitation. We investigated how effective cognitive rehabilitation interventions are at improving executive function after brain injury. We found 19 relevant studies involving 907 people. We were able to combine the results of 13 of these studies including 660 participants (395 traumatic brain injury, 234 stroke, 31 other acquired brain injury). Only two of the studies (82 people) reported the outcome in which we were most interested (a general measure of executive function). We found no evidence that cognitive rehabilitation interventions were helpful for people with executive dysfunction for any other outcomes. We recommend that more research is carried out to determine whether cognitive rehabilitation can improve executive function after stroke and brain injury.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Rééducation cognitive pour traiter les troubles de la fonction exécutive chez l'adulte ayant subi un AVC ou d'autres lésions cérébrales acquises non-progressives de l'adulte

Contexte

Les fonctions exécutives sont les mécanismes de contrôle du cerveau et incluent les processus de planification, d'initiation, d'organisation, d'inhibition, de résolution des problèmes, d'auto-surveillance et de correction des erreurs. Elles sont essentielles au comportement orienté sur les objectifs et à la réponse aux nouvelles situations inédites. Un grand nombre de personnes souffrant de lésions cérébrales acquises, incluant environ 75 % de survivants à un AVC, seront confrontées à des troubles de la fonction exécutive. Les troubles de la fonction exécutive réduisent la capacité à retrouver une indépendance vis-à-vis des activités de la vie quotidienne (AVQ), notamment quand des stratégies alternatives pour l'exécution des mouvements sont nécessaires pour compenser la faiblesse des membres. L'amélioration de la fonction exécutive peut conduire à une plus grande indépendance vis-à-vis des AVQ. Il existe différentes stratégies de rééducation cognitive pour entraîner la fonction exécutive utilisée dans le cadre de la pratique clinique et il est nécessaire de déterminer l'efficacité de ces interventions.

Objectifs

Déterminer les effets de la rééducation cognitive sur les troubles de la fonction exécutive chez l'adulte à la suite d'un AVC ou d'autres lésions cérébrales acquises non-progressives.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre d'essais du groupe Cochrane sur les accidents vasculaires cérébraux (août 2012), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, août 2012), MEDLINE (de 1950 jusqu'à août 2012), EMBASE (de 1980 jusqu'à août 2012), CINAHL (de 1982 jusqu'à août 2012), PsycINFO (de 1806 jusqu'à août 2012), AMED (de 1985 jusqu'à août 2012) et 11 bases de données supplémentaires. Nous avons également recherché dans des références bibliographiques et des registres d'essais, recherché manuellement dans des journaux et des actes de conférence et contacté des experts.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais randomisés portant sur des adultes après une lésion cérébrale acquise non-progressive, dans lesquels l'intervention a spécifiquement ciblé l'amélioration de la fonction cognitive fournissant des données sur les fonctions exécutives séparables (interventions restauratrices), dans lesquels l'intervention a ciblé l'entraînement des participants à des méthodes pour compenser la fonction cognitive perdue (interventions compensatrices) ou dans lesquels l'intervention a concerné l'entraînement à l'utilisation d'une technique adaptative pour améliorer l'indépendance vis-à-vis des AVQ (interventions adaptatives). Le critère de jugement principal était la fonction cognitive globale et les critères de jugement secondaires étaient des composantes spécifiques de la fonction cognitive, la mémoire à court terme, les activités de la vie quotidienne (AVQ), les activités de la vie quotidienne (AVQ) prolongées, la qualité de vie et la participation à des activités professionnelles. Nous avons inclus les études dans lesquelles l'intervention de comparaison était l'absence de traitement, une intervention placebo (c'est-à-dire une intervention de rééducation qui ne doit pas avoir d'effet sur la fonction exécutive), des soins standard ou une autre intervention de rééducation cognitive.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment passé au crible des résumés, extrait des données et évalué des essais. Nous avons entrepris l'évaluation de la qualité méthodologique pour l'assignation secrète, la mise en aveugle des évaluateurs de résultats, la méthode pour s'occuper des données manquantes ainsi que pour d'autres sources potentielles de biais.

Résultats principaux

Dix-neuf études (907 participants) répondaient aux critères d'inclusion de cette revue. Nous avons inclus 13 études (770 participants) dans les méta-analyses (417 lésions cérébrales traumatiques, 304 AVC, 49 autres lésions cérébrales acquises) ramenées à 660 participants une fois que les groupes des interventions non incluses ont été retirés des études comprenant trois et quatre groupes. Nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'obtenir des données dans les six études restantes.  Trois études (134 participants) ont comparé la rééducation cognitive à la thérapie sensorimotrice.  Aucune n'a rapporté notre critère de jugement principal ; des données issues d'une étude étaient disponibles sur les critères de jugement secondaires incluant la formation de concept et les activités de la vie quotidienne (AVQ). Six études (333 participants) ont comparé la rééducation cognitive à l'absence de traitement ou à un placebo. Aucune n'a rapporté notre critère de jugement principal ; des données issues de quatre études n'ont révélé aucun effet statistiquement significatif de la rééducation cognitive sur les critères de jugement secondaires. Dix études (448 participants) ont comparé deux différentes approches de rééducation cognitive. Dix études (82 participants) ont rapporté des données sur le critère de jugement principal ; aucun effet statistiquement significatif n'a été mis en évidence. Des données issues de huit études n'ont révélé aucun effet statistiquement significatif sur les critères de jugement secondaires.  Nous avons exploré l'effet des interventions restauratrices (10 études, 468 participants) et des interventions compensatrices (quatre études, 128 participants) et n'avons détecté aucun effet statistiquement significatif comparées aux autres interventions.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons pas identifié suffisamment de preuves de grande qualité pour parvenir à des conclusions généralisées sur l'effet de la rééducation cognitive sur la fonction exécutive, ou d'autres mesures de critères de jugement secondaires. Des recherches supplémentaires de grande qualité comparant la rééducation cognitive à l'absence d'intervention, un placebo ou des interventions sensorimotrices sont recommandées.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Rééducation cognitive pour traiter les troubles de la fonction exécutive après une lésion cérébrale

La fonction exécutive est le terme utilisée pour décrire les processus cérébraux que nous utilisons pour nous organiser et résoudre les problèmes. La fonction exécutive est souvent affectée lorsque le cerveau est touché par un traumatisme ou une cause interne telle que l'AVC. Il a été estimé que 75 % d'individus environ seront confrontés à des troubles de la fonction exécutive après un AVC. Les personnes souffrant de problèmes de la fonction exécutive (troubles de la fonction exécutive) trouvent souvent qu'il est difficile d'apprendre de nouvelles manières pour exécuter les activités quotidiennes, telles que s'habiller elles-mêmes.  Il sera peut-être très difficile d'apprendre de nouvelles manières pour s'occuper des autres problèmes, tels que les difficultés d'exécution des mouvements, qui surviennent aussi à la suite de leur lésion cérébrale. La rééducation cognitive est un type de thérapie qui vise à améliorer l'attention, la mémoire ou la fonction exécutive de la personne. S'il est possible d'améliorer la fonction exécutive, il est probable qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes souffrant de lésions cérébrales deviennent plus indépendantes vis-à-vis des activités de la vie quotidienne, et répondent mieux à leur rééducation. Nous avons évalué le niveau d'efficacité des interventions de rééducation cognitive pour améliorer la fonction exécutive après une lésion cérébrale. Nous avons trouvé 19 études pertinentes impliquant au total 907 participants. Nous avons pu combiner les résultats de 13 de ces études impliquant 660 participants (395 lésions cérébrales traumatiques, 234 AVC, 31 autres lésions cérébrales acquises). Deux études seulement (82 personnes) ont rendu compte du critère de jugement qui nous intéressait le plus (une mesure générale de la fonction exécutive). Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve indiquant que les interventions de rééducation cognitive ont été utiles chez les personnes souffrant d'un trouble de la fonction exécutive pour aucun autre critère.  Nous recommandons que des recherches supplémentaires soient menées afin de déterminer si la rééducation cognitive peut améliorer la fonction exécutive après un AVC et une lésion cérébrale.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 17th May, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.