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Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage

  1. Charlie SY Chung1,*,
  2. Alex Pollock2,
  3. Tanya Campbell3,
  4. Brian R Durward4,
  5. Suzanne Hagen2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Stroke Group

Published Online: 30 APR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 23 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008391.pub2


How to Cite

Chung CSY, Pollock A, Campbell T, Durward BR, Hagen S. Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD008391. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008391.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    NHS Fife, Department of Occupational Therapy, Kirkcaldy, Fife, UK

  2. 2

    Glasgow Caledonian University, Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow, UK

  3. 3

    Glasgow Caledonian University, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Social Care, Glasgow, UK

  4. 4

    NHS Education for Scotland, Edinburgh, UK

*Charlie SY Chung, Department of Occupational Therapy, NHS Fife, Ward 12 (Stroke Unit), Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy, Fife, KY2 5AH, UK. chungsongyau@aol.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 APR 2013

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[Figure 1]
Figure 1. Study flow diagram.
[Figure 2]
Figure 2. Risk of bias summary: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item for each included study.
[Analysis 1.1]
Analysis 1.1. Comparison 1 Cognitive rehabilitation versus standard care, Outcome 1 Components of executive function.
[Analysis 1.2]
Analysis 1.2. Comparison 1 Cognitive rehabilitation versus standard care, Outcome 2 Activities of daily living.
[Analysis 2.1]
Analysis 2.1. Comparison 2 Cognitive rehabilitation versus no treatment, Outcome 1 Components of executive function.
[Analysis 2.2]
Analysis 2.2. Comparison 2 Cognitive rehabilitation versus no treatment, Outcome 2 Working memory.
[Analysis 2.3]
Analysis 2.3. Comparison 2 Cognitive rehabilitation versus no treatment, Outcome 3 Activities of daily living.
[Analysis 3.1]
Analysis 3.1. Comparison 3 Experimental cognitive rehabilitation versus standard cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 1 Global executive function.
[Analysis 3.2]
Analysis 3.2. Comparison 3 Experimental cognitive rehabilitation versus standard cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 2 Components of executive function.
[Analysis 3.3]
Analysis 3.3. Comparison 3 Experimental cognitive rehabilitation versus standard cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 3 Working memory.
[Analysis 3.4]
Analysis 3.4. Comparison 3 Experimental cognitive rehabilitation versus standard cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 4 Activities of daily living.
[Analysis 3.5]
Analysis 3.5. Comparison 3 Experimental cognitive rehabilitation versus standard cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 5 Quality of life.
[Analysis 3.6]
Analysis 3.6. Comparison 3 Experimental cognitive rehabilitation versus standard cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 6 Vocational activities.
[Analysis 3.7]
Analysis 3.7. Comparison 3 Experimental cognitive rehabilitation versus standard cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 7 Vocational activities (dichotomous).
[Analysis 4.1]
Analysis 4.1. Comparison 4 Type of cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 1 Concept formation.
[Analysis 4.2]
Analysis 4.2. Comparison 4 Type of cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 2 Working memory.
[Analysis 4.3]
Analysis 4.3. Comparison 4 Type of cognitive rehabilitation, Outcome 3 Activities of daily living.