Intervention Review

Skin-to-skin care for procedural pain in neonates

  1. Celeste Johnston1,*,
  2. Marsha Campbell-Yeo2,
  3. Ananda Fernandes3,
  4. Darlene Inglis2,
  5. David Streiner4,
  6. Rebekah Zee2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neonatal Group

Published Online: 23 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008435.pub2

How to Cite

Johnston C, Campbell-Yeo M, Fernandes A, Inglis D, Streiner D, Zee R. Skin-to-skin care for procedural pain in neonates. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008435. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008435.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    McGill University, Ingram School of Nursing, Quebec, Canada

  2. 2

    IWK Health Centre, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

  3. 3

    Coimbra College of Nursing, Department of Child Health, Coimbra, Portugal

  4. 4

    Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Room 3G31, Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit, North York, Ontario, Canada

*Celeste Johnston, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Quebec, H3A 2T5, Canada. celeste.johnston@mcgill.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Background

Skin-to-skin care (SSC), otherwise known as Kangaroo Care (KC) due to its similarity with marsupial behaviour of ventral maternal-infant contact, is one non-pharmacological intervention for pain control in infants.

Objectives

The primary objectives were to determine the effect of SSC alone on pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonates undergoing painful procedures compared to no intervention, sucrose or other analgesics, or additions to simple SSC such as rocking; and the effects of the amount of SSC (duration in minutes) and the method of administration (who provided the SSC, positioning of caregiver and neonate pair).

The secondary objectives were to determine the incidence of untoward effects of SSC and to compare the SSC effect in different postmenstrual age subgroups of infants.

Search methods

The standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Collaborative Review Group were used. Databases searched in August 2011: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library); Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews; MEDLINE (1950 onwards); PubMed (1975 onwards); EMBASE (1974 onwards); CINAHL (1982 onwards); Web of Science (1980 onwards); LILACS database (1982 onwards); SCIELO database (1982 onwards); PsycInfo (1980 onwards); AMED (1985 onwards); Dissertation-Abstracts International (1980 onwards). Searches were conducted throughout September 2012.

Selection criteria

Studies with randomisation or quasi-randomisation, double or single-blinded, involving term infants (> 37 completed weeks postmenstrual age (PMA)) to a maximum of 44 weeks PMA and preterm infants (< 37 completed weeks PMA) receiving SSC for painful procedures conducted by doctors, nurses, or other healthcare professionals.

Data collection and analysis

The main outcome measures were physiological or behavioural pain indicators and composite pain scores. A weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a fixed-effect model was reported for continuous outcome measures. We included variations on type of tissue-damaging procedure, provider of care, and duration of SSC.

Main results

Nineteen studies (n = 1594 infants) were included. Fifteen studies (n = 744) used heel lance as the painful procedure, one study combined venepuncture and heel stick (n = 50), two used intramuscular injection, and one used 'vaccination' (n = 80). The studies that were included were generally strong and free from bias.

Eleven studies (n = 1363) compared SSC alone to a no-treatment control. Although 11 studies measured heart rate during painful procedures, data from only four studies (n = 121) could be combined to give a mean difference (MD) of 0.35 beats per minute (95% CI -6.01 to 6.71). Three other studies that were not included in meta-analyses also reported no difference in heart rate after the painful procedure. Two studies reported heart rate variability outcomes and found no significant differences. Five studies used the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) as a primary outcome, which favoured SCC at 30 seconds (n = 268) (MD -3.21, 95% CI -3.94 to -2.48), 60 seconds (n = 164) (MD -1.85, 95% CI -3.03 to -0.68), and 90 seconds (n = 163) (MD -1.34, 95% CI -2.56 to -0.13), but at 120 seconds (n = 157) there was no difference. No studies provided findings on return of heart rate to baseline level, oxygen saturation, cortisol levels, duration of crying, and facial actions that could be combined for analysis.

Eight studies compared SSC to another intervention with or without a no-treatment control. Two cross-over studies (n = 80) compared mother versus other provider on PIPP scores at 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds with no significant difference. When SSC was compared to other interventions, there were not enough similar studies to pool results in an analysis. One study compared SSC with and without dextrose and found that the combination was most effective and that SSC alone was more effective than dextrose alone. Similarly, in another study SSC was more effective than oral glucose for heart rate but not oxygen saturation. SSC either in combination with breastfeeding or alone was favoured over a no-treatment control, but was not different to breastfeeding. There were not enough participants with similar outcomes and painful procedures to compare age groups or duration of SSC. No adverse events were reported in any of the studies.

Authors' conclusions

SSC appears to be effective, as measured by composite pain indicators and including both physiological and behavioural indicators, and safe for a single painful procedure such as a heel lance. Purely behavioural indicators tended to favour SSC but there remains questionable bias regarding behavioural indicators. Physiological indicators were typically not different between conditions. Only two studies compared mother providers to others, with non-significant results. There was more heterogeneity in the studies with behavioural or composite outcomes. There is a need for replication studies that use similar, clearly defined outcomes. New studies examining optimal duration of SSC, gestational age groups, repeated use, and long-term effects of SSC are needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Skin-to-skin (Kangaroo Care) with newborns cuts down procedural pain

Newborns wearing only a diaper being held next to their mother's bare chest is referred to as skin-to-skin contact and is also sometimes called Kangaroo Care because of its similarity to the way kangaroo mothers care for their young. Newborns, especially those who must spend time in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, must have various tests and procedures as part of their care, for example, heel stick, vein puncture, and injections. Giving analgesic drugs for these procedures can often pose problems so that alternatives to drugs must be found. Kangaroo Care appears to reduce the pain response to these frequent procedures, although few studies could be combined to provide strong evidence. As far as it has been reported, Kangaroo Care is safe. Nineteen studies were examined which showed that signs of pain, with a combination of physical and behavioural signs, support the use of Kangaroo Care. Physiological indicators of pain, such as heart rate, did not show a significant difference. Although we believe that Kangaroo Care is effective the size of the benefit may not be large.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Le contact peau à peau pour la douleur procédurale chez le nouveau-né

Contexte

Le contact peau à peau (CPP), désigné par la méthode mère-kangourou (MK) en raison de sa similarité avec le comportement marsupial du contact ventral entre la mère et le nourrisson, est une intervention non pharmacologique pour le contrôle de la douleur chez les nouveau-nés.

Objectifs

Les objectifs principaux étaient de déterminer l'effet du CPP seul sur la douleur relative aux procédures médicales ou aux soins infirmiers chez les nouveau-nés subissant des procédures douloureuses par rapport à l'absence d'intervention, au saccharose ou autres analgésiques, ou à d'autres ajouts tels que le bercement en plus du simple CPP; et les effets de la durée de CPP (durée en minutes) et de la méthode d'administration (ayant fournie le CPP, le positionnement du soignant et du nouveau-né).

Les objectifs secondaires étaient de déterminer l'incidence des effets malencontreux du CPP et de comparer les effets du CPP à des âges post-menstruels différents parmi les sous-groupes de nourrissons.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Les méthodes standard du groupe Cochrane sur la néonatologie ont été utilisées. Les bases de données consultées en août 2011 : Le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) dans la Bibliothèque Cochrane) ; Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews ; MEDLINE (à partir de 1950) ; PubMed (à partir de 1975) ; EMBASE (à partir de 1974) ; CINAHL (à partir de 1982) ; Web of Science (à partir de 1980) ; base de données LILACS (à partir de 1982) ; SCIELO base de données (à partir de 1982) ; PsycInfo (à partir de 1980) ; AMED (à partir de 1985) ; Dissertation-Abstracts International (à partir de 1980). Les recherches ont été menées en septembre 2012.

Critères de sélection

Les études, randomisées ou quasi-randomisées, en double ou en simple aveugle, portant sur les nourrissons nés à terme ((> 37 semaines d'âge post-menstruel (APM)) à un maximum de 44 semaines d'APM et les nouveau-nés prématurés (< 37 semaines d'APM) recevant le CPP pour les procédures douloureuses menées par les médecins, infirmières, ou d'autres professionnels de santé.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les principaux critères de jugement étaient les indicateurs physiologiques ou comportementaux de la douleur et les résultats composites de douleur. Une différence moyenne pondérée (DMP) avec un intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) à l'aide d'un modèle à effets fixes a été rapportée pour les mesures de résultats continus. Nous avons inclus des variations sur le type de procédure endommageant le tissu, sur les prestataires de soins et sur la durée du CPP.

Résultats Principaux

Dix-neuf études (n = 1 594 nourrissons) ont été incluses. Quinze études (n = 744) utilisaient la ponction au talon en tant que procédure douloureuse, une étude combinait la ponction veineuse et la ponction au talon (n = 50), deux utilisaient une injection intramusculaire et une seule utilisait la «vaccination» (n = 80). Les études qui ont été incluses étaient généralement solides et exemptes de biais.

Onze études (n = 1 363) comparaient le PCC seul à une absence de traitement. Bien que 11 études mesuraient la fréquence cardiaque pendant des procédures douloureuses, les données issues de quatre études seulement (n = 121) ont pu être combinées pour effectuer une différence moyenne (DM) de 0,35 battements par minute (IC à 95 % -6,01 à 6,71). Trois autres études, qui n'ont pas été incluses dans la méta-analyse, n'ont également rapporté aucune différence en termes de fréquence cardiaque après la procédure douloureuse. Deux études rendaient compte de critères de jugement relatifs à la variabilité du rythme cardiaque et n'ont trouvé aucune différence significative. Cinq études utilisaient la grille Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) en tant que critère de jugement principal, celle-ci favorisait le CPP à 30 secondes (n = 268) (DM -3,21, IC à 95 % -3,94 à -2,48), à 60 secondes (n = 164) (DM -1,85, IC à 95 % -3,03 à -0,68) et à 90 secondes (n = 163) (DM -1,34, IC à 95 % -2,56 à -0,13), mais il n'y avait aucune différence à 120 secondes (n = 157). Aucune étude n'a fourni de résultats sur le retour de la fréquence cardiaque au niveau de départ, sur la saturation en oxygène, sur les niveaux de cortisol, sur la durée des pleurs et sur les actions faciales qui auraient pu être combinées pour l'analyse.

Huit études comparaient le CPP à une autre intervention, avec ou sans groupe témoin ne bénéficiant d'aucun traitement. Deux études croisées (n = 80) comparaient la mère par rapport à d'autres donneurs de soins sur les scores PIPP à 30, 60, 90 et 120 secondes sans différence significative. Lorsqu'un CPP était comparé à d'autres interventions, il n'y avait pas suffisamment d'études similaires pour regrouper les résultats dans une analyse. Une étude comparait le CPP avec et sans dextrose et a trouvé que la combinaison était la plus efficace et que le CPP seul était plus efficace que le dextrose seul. De même, dans une autre étude, le CPP était plus efficace que le glucose par voie orale pour le rythme cardiaque, mais pas la saturation en oxygène. Le CPP, combiné avec l'allaitement maternel ou seul, était favorisé par rapport à un témoin sans traitement, mais n'était pas différent de l'allaitement maternel. Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de participants avec des résultats similaires ni de procédures douloureuses pour comparer les groupes d'âge ou la durée du CPP. Aucun effet indésirable n'a été signalé dans aucune des études.

Conclusions des auteurs

Le CPP semble être efficace, tel que mesuré par les indicateurs composites de la douleur, notamment les indicateurs physiologiques et comportementaux. Il semble également être sûr lors d'une seule procédure douloureuse telle qu'une ponction au talon. Les indicateurs purement comportementaux tendaient à favoriser le CPP mais des biais restent discutables en ce qui concerne les indicateurs comportementaux. Les indicateurs physiologiques n'étaient généralement pas différents suivant les conditions. Seules deux études comparaient la mère à d'autres prestataires de soins, avec des résultats non significatifs. Il y avait plus d'hétérogénéité dans les études avec des critères de jugement comportementaux ou composites. D'autres réplications d'études, utilisant des critères de jugement similaires et clairement définis, sont nécessaires. De nouvelles études, examinant la durée optimale du CPP, les groupes d'âge gestationnel, l'utilisation répétée et les effets à long terme du CPP, sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Le contact peau à peau pour la douleur procédurale chez le nouveau-né

Le contact peau à peau (méthode mère-kangourou) avec les nouveau-nés diminue la douleur procédurale

Les nouveau-nés portant uniquement une couche et qui sont portés proche de la poitrine nue de la mère est décrit comme un contact peau à peau et est parfois appelé la méthode mère-kangourou en raison de sa similarité avec la manière dont les mères kangourou prennent soins de leur bébé. Les nouveau-nés, en particulier ceux qui doivent passer du temps dans l'unité de soins intensifs néonatale, doivent subir plusieurs tests et procédures dans le cadre de leurs soins, par exemple, une ponction au talon, une ponction veineuse et des injections. L'administration de médicaments analgésiques pour ces procédures peut souvent entraîner des problèmes, des alternatives à ces médicaments doivent donc être trouvées. La méthode mère-kangourou semble réduire la réponse à la douleur envers ces procédures fréquentes, bien que peu d'études aient pu être combinées pour fournir des preuves solides. Jusqu'à présent, les rapports indiquent que la méthode mère-kangourou est sûre. Dix-neuf études examinées démontrent que les signes de la douleur, avec une combinaison de signes physiques et comportementaux, recommandent l'utilisation de la méthode mère-kangourou. Les indicateurs physiologiques de la douleur, tels que la fréquence cardiaque, n'ont pas mis en évidence de différence significative. Bien qu'il nous semble que la méthode mère-kangourou soit efficace, l'ampleur du bénéfice pourrait ne pas être importante.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Kontakt kože na kožu kod novorođenčadi smanjuje proceduralnu bol

Kontakt kože na kožu (Klokan njega) kod novorođenčadi smanjuje proceduralnu bol

Držanje novorođenčadi koja nosi samo pelenu uz majčina gola prsa naziva se kontakt koža na kožu, a ponekad se naziva i “Klokan njega” zbog svoje sličnosti s načinom na koji majke klokanice skrbe za svoje mlade. Novorođenčad, a pogotovo ona koja moraju provesti vrijeme u neonatalnoj jedinici intenzivnog liječenja, mora podnositi razne pretrage i postupke u sklopu medicinske skrbi, na primjer, ubod u područje pete, punkcija vene i injekcije. Davanje analgetičkih lijekova kod ovih postupaka često može predstavljati problem, stoga je nužno pronaći alternativu lijekovima. Čini se da Klokan njega smanjuje odgovor na bol kod tih čestih postupaka, iako se nekoliko studija može kombinirati za pružanje snažnih dokaza. Do sada se izvijestilo da je Klokan njega sigurna. Bilo je ispitano 19 studija koje su pokazale da znakovi boli, uz kombinaciju fizičkih i bihevioralnih znakova, podržavaju korištenje Klokan njege. Fiziološki pokazatelji boli kao što su otkucaji srca, nisu pokazali značajnu razliku. Iako vjerujemo da je Klokan njega učinkovita, ​​veličina koristi možda nije velika.

Translation notes

Translated by: Croatian Branch of the Italian Cochrane Centre