Get access

Optimal monitoring strategies for guiding when to switch first-line antiretroviral therapy regimens for treatment failure in adults and adolescents living with HIV in low-resource settings

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors


Abstract

Background

One of the critical clinical decisions made in antiretroviral therapy (ART) is when to switch from an initial regimen to another due to treatment failure. This complex process requires consideration of multiple factors including: (1) what type of monitoring (e.g. clinical, immunologic, virologic) is available to guide switching; (2) establishing criteria for treatment failure (e.g. viral load >10,000 copies/mL); (3) integrating data from different types of monitoring; (4) making a decision; and, if possible, (5) follow-up and monitoring to determine patient outcomes. The initial step in this model of deciding when to switch is determining what type of monitoring for guiding when to switch is available and appropriate. This review seeks to find and summarize evidence on optimal monitoring strategies for guiding when to switch first-line regimens due to treatment failure among adults and adolescents living with HIV in low-resource settings. This review was one of a series of reviews prepared in 2009 at the request of the World Health Organization to inform the development of new guidelines on ART for adults and adolescents.

Objectives

To assess optimal monitoring strategies for guiding when to switch antiretroviral therapy regimens for first-line treatment failure among adults and adolescents living with HIV in low-resource settings.

Search methods

We formulated a comprehensive and exhaustive search strategy in an attempt to identify all relevant studies regardless of language or publication status. In July 2009, we search the following electronic journal and trial databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL. We also searched conference databases using NLM Gateway (for HIV/AIDS conference abstracts before 2005), abstract databases from the Conferences on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Conferences, and International AIDS Society Conferences on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention from 2005 to 2009, and the trials registers ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, and Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry. We contacted researchers and relevant organizations and checked reference lists for all included studies.

Selection criteria

We selected studies which evaluated a monitoring intervention/strategy that helps guide when to switch ART. Study types included randomized controlled trials and observational studies (cohort and case-control) which included comparators.

Data collection and analysis

One author performed an initial screening. Two authors performed a detailed screening. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data, and graded methodological quality. Differences were resolved by a third reviewer. Heterogeneity was assessed, and meta-analyses were performed where appropriate.

Main results

Two randomized trials were identified which were in abstract form only. Two cohort studies (both published) with comparators were identified. Of the evidence available, three comparisons were studied: clinical versus immunologic and clinical monitoring; clinical versus virologic, immunologic, and clinical monitoring; and immunologic and clinical monitoring versus virologic, immunologic, and clinical monitoring. Clinical vs. Immunologic and Clinical Monitoring: Based upon two randomized trials, clinical monitoring alone results in increased mortality (low-quality evidence), increased AIDS-defining illnesses and mortality as a composite endpoint (moderate), no difference in serious adverse events (low), increased numbers of unnecessary switches (low), and no difference in switches to second-line (low) compared to immunological and clinical monitoring. Clinical vs. Virologic, Immunologic, and Clinical Monitoring: Based upon a single randomized trial, clinical monitoring alone results in a trend toward increased mortality (low), increased AIDS-defining illnesses and mortality as a composite endpoint (low), increased unnecessary switches (low), no difference in virologic treatment failures (low), and a trend toward increased switches to second-line (low) compared to virologic, immunologic, and clinical monitoring. Immunologic and Clinical vs. Virologic, Immunologic, and Clinical Monitoring: Based upon a single randomized trial, immunologic and clinical monitoring results in no difference in mortality (low), no difference in AIDS-defining illnesses and mortality as a composite endpoint (low), no difference in  unnecessary switches (very low), no difference in virologic treatment failures (low), and no difference in switches to second-line (low) compared to virologic, immunologic, and clinical monitoring. Observational studies appear to demonstrate that programs with virologic, immunologic, and clinical monitoring switch therapy more frequently (very low), earlier (very low), and at higher CD4 counts (very low) compared with programs that have immunologic and clinical monitoring alone.

Authors' conclusions

A limited number of studies were available to address this topic, and, of the two randomized trials identified, both were in abstract form only. Observational studies also were limited in number and were of lesser quality. Although the quality of the evidence varied from the randomized trials, ranging from very low to moderate, there appeared to be substantial benefits for key outcomes (e.g. mortality, AIDS-defining illness and mortality as a composite endpoint, and unnecessary switches) favoring both immunologic and clinical monitoring or virologic, immunologic, and clinical monitoring versus clinical monitoring alone. Very low-quality evidence from observational studies suggested that virologic, immunologic, and clinical monitoring led to more frequent switching, earlier switching, and switching at higher CD4 counts compared with immunologic and clinical monitoring. Further information on the studies currently reported in abstract form will provide insight. Ongoing studies addressing this topic likely will provide information to further clarify optimal monitoring strategies for guiding when to switch first-line therapy. Additionally, studies looking at different virologic monitoring frequencies and/or virologic monitoring at different times after ART initiation (e.g. after 2-3 years) would be informative. Finally, cost-analysis studies will lend further insights into the applicability of these findings to low-resource settings.

摘要

背景

在資源缺乏的環境下,針對治療失敗的成人或青少年愛滋病患者,監測何時更換第一線抗反轉錄病毒處方的最佳方式

抗反轉錄病毒治療﹝ART﹞的其中一個重大臨床決策,就是發現治療失敗後,何時應該轉換成其他療法。這個複雜的過程須要考量到許多因素,包括:﹝1﹞何種監測方式可以作為轉換的準則﹝例如:臨床診斷、免疫學、病毒學﹞;﹝2﹞治療失敗標準的訂定﹝例如:當病毒量 >10,000 copies/mL﹞;﹝3﹞將各種監測的數據整合;﹝4﹞做出決定;且在可能的情況下﹝5﹞要做後續的追蹤且監測並評估病人的治療結果。這個模式的起始步驟,就是要先決定要用何種監測方式去判斷何時做療程的轉換。這篇評論希望能夠找到並總結,在資源缺乏的環境下,對於治療失敗的成人或青少年愛滋病患者,療程轉換時機的最佳監測方式。這份評論是2009年在世界衛生組織的要求下,為了提供成人和青少年愛滋病患者新的抗反轉錄治療準則,準備的一系列評論中的其中之一。

目標

評估在資源缺乏的環境下,針對治療失敗的成人或青少年愛滋病患者,監測何時更換第一線抗反轉錄病毒處方的最佳方式。

搜尋策略

為了找出所有相關的研究,不論語言或發表狀態,我們制定了一個詳盡且徹底的的搜尋策略。2009年7月,我們搜尋了以下的電子期刊和試驗資料庫:MEDLINE、EMBASE、CENTRAL。我們也利用HLM Gateway搜尋了研討會資料庫﹝2005年以前,針對HIV/愛滋病的研討會摘要﹞the Conferences on Retroviruses的摘要資料庫以及Opportunistic Infections、International AIDS Conferences、International AIDS Society Conferences on HIV Pathogenesis、Treatment和2005年到2009年的Prevention以及試驗註冊的ClinicalTrials.gov、Current Controlled Trials和PanAfrican Clinical Trials Registry。我們連絡了研究者和相關組織,且檢視了所有收錄研究中的參考資料。

選擇標準

我們挑選了評估協助決定療法轉換時機的監測策略的研究。研究的種類包括有對照組的隨機對照試驗和觀察性研究﹝世代研究和樣本對照﹞。

資料收集與分析

由一位作者負責初步的篩選。兩位作者接著做更細節的篩選。兩位作者分別評估研究的可用性、濃縮數據,並且替方法品質評分。由第三位評論者解決意見分歧的部分。我們評估異質性,以及在適當的部分做整合分析。

主要結論

我們找到了兩篇只有摘要的隨機試驗。我們也找到兩篇有對照組的世代研究﹝都是已發表的﹞。目前可得的證據中討論到三組比較:臨床評估和免疫及臨床監測的比較;臨床評估和病毒、免疫及臨床監測的比較;還有免疫及臨床監測和病毒、免疫及臨床監測的比較。臨床評估和免疫及臨床的比較:根據兩個隨機試驗,比起併用免疫和臨床監測,單獨做臨床監測,會造成死亡率的增加﹝證據品質低﹞、愛滋病相關的不適感以及死亡率的複合的結果上升﹝中等﹞、嚴重不良反應上沒有差異﹝低﹞、不必要的療程轉換增加﹝低﹞,轉換為第二線治療的機率也沒有差異﹝低﹞。臨床評估和病毒、免疫及臨床監測的比較:根據一個隨機試驗的結果,比起併用病毒、免疫和臨床監測,單獨做臨床監測,有使死亡率增加﹝低﹞、愛滋病相關不適感以及死亡率的複合最終結果上升﹝低﹞、不必要的療程轉換增加﹝低﹞的趨勢,病毒治療的失敗率上則沒有差異﹝低﹞、轉換到第二線治療的機率增加﹝低﹞。免疫及臨床評估和病毒、免疫及臨床監測的比較:根據一個隨機試驗,比起併用病毒、免疫及臨床監測,只併用免疫和臨床監測,死亡率上沒有差異﹝低﹞、後天免疫不全症候群定義指標的疾病和死亡率的複合最終結果沒有差異﹝低﹞、不必要的療程轉換率也沒有差異﹝極低﹞、病毒治療失敗的機率沒有差異﹝低﹞、轉換為第二線治療的機率也沒有差異﹝低﹞。觀察性研究的結果顯示,比起單獨使用免疫及臨床監測的組別,併用病毒、免疫及臨床監測的組別,轉換療程的次數比較頻繁﹝極低﹞且較早﹝極低﹞,而且是在CD4數量較高的時候﹝極低﹞。

作者結論

可取得的相關研究數量有限,而且找到的兩篇臨床試驗都只有摘要。觀察性研究的數量也很有限且品質較差。雖然隨機試驗結果的品質也各不相同,從低到中等都有,其中也提供關於主要結果﹝例如:死亡率、後天免疫不全症候群定義指標的疾病和死亡率的複合最終結果以及不必要的療程轉換﹞,支持併用免疫及臨床監測或併用病毒、免疫監測及臨床監測。觀察性研究中品質極低的證據顯示,比起免疫及臨床監測,併用病毒、免疫及臨床監測會導致較頻繁的療程轉換、轉換時間較早,以及在CD4數量較高的時後轉換。這些研究中,目前以摘要形式公布的資訊會在內文中提出。一些正在進行的相關研究,也許能提供更多資訊,以進一步了解療法轉換的最佳監測方式。此外,討論各種病毒監測的頻率,或是討論抗反轉錄病毒治療開始後不同時間的病毒監測﹝例如:2 – 3年後﹞的研究,也能夠提供更多訊息。最後,成本分析研究能更進一步的檢視這些方法在資源缺乏的環境下的實用性。

翻譯人

本摘要由朱奕蓁翻譯。

此翻譯計畫由臺灣國家衛生研究院 (National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan) 統籌。

總結

在欠缺設備的環境下,針對治療失敗的成人或青少年愛滋病患者,監測何時更換第一線抗反轉錄病毒處方的最佳方式:為了提供最佳的照護給愛滋病患,決定何時替治療失敗的病患轉換反轉錄病毒療法是很重要的。在設備欠缺的環境下,監測方式像是免疫監測或免疫及病毒監測加上臨床監測,可以做為療法轉換的準則,使死亡人數降低、後天免疫不全症候群定義指標的疾病減少,以及減少不必要的治療轉換。目前能證明合併病毒及免疫監測有利的證據很少。這些研究中更進一步的資訊,目前大多只公開部分,能讓我們更深入了解這個議題。此外,正在進行的相關研究,也能提供訊息,使我們更加清楚療法轉換的最佳監測方式。最後,成本分析研究能更進一步的檢視這些方法在資源缺乏的環境下的實用性。

Résumé scientifique

Stratégies de surveillance optimale pour orienter le changement de schéma antirétroviral de première intention en cas d'échec du traitement chez les adultes et les adolescents vivant avec le VIH dans des environnements aux ressources limitées

Contexte

Dans le cadre d'un traitement antirétroviral (TARV), l'une des décisions cliniques critiques consiste à identifier le moment de passer d'un schéma thérapeutique initial à un autre en raison d'un échec du traitement. Ce processus complexe exige de tenir compte de multiples facteurs, notamment : (1) le type de surveillance (ex. : clinique, immunologique, virologique) disponible pour orienter le changement ; (2) l'établissement des critères définissant l'échec du traitement (ex. : charge virale > 10 000 copies/ml) ; (3) l'intégration des données provenant de différents types de surveillances ; (4) la prise de décision ; et, si possible, (5) le suivi et la surveillance pour évaluer les résultats des patients.La première étape de ce modèle visant à identifier le moment du changement consiste à déterminer le type de surveillance disponible et approprié pour orienter la décision. L'objectif de cette revue était d'identifier et de résumer les preuves relatives aux stratégies de surveillance les plus efficaces pour orienter le changement de schéma thérapeutique de première intention en raison d'un échec du traitement chez les adultes et les adolescents vivant avec le VIH dans des environnements aux ressources limitées. Cette revue fait partie d'une série de revues préparées en 2009 à la demande de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé afin d'orienter le développement de nouvelles directives sur le TARV chez les adultes et les adolescents.

Objectifs

Évaluer les stratégies de surveillance les plus efficaces pour orienter le changement de schéma thérapeutique antirétroviral en cas d'échec du traitement de première intention chez les adultes et les adolescents vivant avec le VIH dans des environnements aux ressources limitées.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons formulé une stratégie de recherche documentaire complète et exhaustive dans le but d'identifier toutes les études pertinentes, sans restriction de langue ni de statut de publication. En juillet 2009, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les revues et bases de données d'essais électroniques suivantes : MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL. Nous avons également consulté les bases de données des congrès à l'aide de NLM Gateway (pour les résumés de congrès sur le VIH/sida antérieurs à 2005), les bases de données des résumés des Conférences sur les rétrovirus et infections opportunistes, des Conférences internationales sur le SIDA et des Conférences de la société internationale du SIDA sur la pathogénèse du VIH, le traitement et la prévention de 2005 à 2009, ainsi que les registres d’essais cliniques ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials et Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry. Nous avons contacté les chercheurs et organismes concernés et examiné les références bibliographiques de toutes les études incluses.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné les études évaluant une intervention/stratégie de surveillance permettant de choisir le moment de changer de TARV. Il s'agissait d'essais contrôlés randomisés et d'études observationnelles (études de cohorte et cas-témoins) qui incluaient des comparateurs.

Recueil et analyse des données

Un auteur a effectué un examen initial. Deux auteurs ont effectué un examen détaillé. Deux auteurs ont évalué l'éligibilité des études, extrait les données et évalué la qualité méthodologique de manière indépendante. Les divergences ont été résolues par un troisième évaluateur. L'hétérogénéité a été évaluée et des méta-analyses ont été effectuées lorsque cela était approprié.

Résultats principaux

Deux essais randomisés ont été identifiés sous forme de résumé uniquement. Deux études de cohorte avec comparateurs (toutes deux publiées) ont été identifiées. Sur l'ensemble des preuves disponibles, trois comparaisons ont été étudiées : surveillance clinique versus immunologique et clinique ; surveillance clinique versus virologique, immunologique et clinique ; et surveillance immunologique et clinique versus virologique, immunologique et clinique. Surveillance clinique versus immunologique et clinique : Sur la base de deux essais randomisés, la surveillance clinique seule entraînait une augmentation de la mortalité (preuves de faible qualité), une augmentation des maladies indicatrices du sida et de la mortalité en tant que critère de jugement composite (qualité moyenne), aucune différence en termes d'événements indésirables graves (faible qualité), une augmentation du nombre de changements superflus (faible qualité) et aucune différence concernant le passage à un traitement de deuxième intention (faible qualité) par rapport à une surveillance immunologique et clinique. Surveillance clinique versus virologique, immunologique et clinique : Sur la base d'un seul essai randomisé, la surveillance clinique seule entraînait une tendance à la hausse de la mortalité (faible qualité), une augmentation des maladies indicatrices du sida et de la mortalité en tant que critère de jugement composite (faible qualité), une augmentation des changements superflus (faible qualité), aucune différence en termes d'échecs virologiques du traitement (faible qualité) et une tendance à la hausse du passage à un traitement de deuxième intention (faible qualité) par rapport à une surveillance virologique, immunologique et clinique. Surveillance immunologique et clinique versus virologique, immunologique et clinique : Sur la base d'un seul essai randomisé, la surveillance immunologique et clinique n'entraînait aucune différence en termes de mortalité (faible qualité), de maladies indicatrices du sida et de mortalité en tant que critère de jugement composite (faible qualité), de changements superflus (très faible qualité), d'échecs virologiques du traitement (faible qualité) et de passage à un traitement de deuxième intention (faible qualité) par rapport à une surveillance virologique, immunologique et clinique. Les études observationnelles semblent démontrer que les programmes incluant une surveillance virologique, immunologique et clinique entraînent des changements de traitement plus fréquents (très faible qualité), plus précoces (très faible qualité) et à des numérations de CD4 plus élevées (très faible qualité) par rapport aux programmes utilisant uniquement une surveillance immunologique et clinique.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les études évaluant cette question étaient peu nombreuses, et les deux essais randomisés identifiés étaient uniquement disponibles sous forme de résumé. Les études observationnelles étaient également peu nombreuses et de moins bonne qualité. Bien que la qualité des preuves issues des essais randomisés soit variable (de très faible à moyenne), des bénéfices substantiels semblaient associés aux critères de jugement principaux (ex. : mortalité, maladie indicatrice du sida et mortalité en tant que critère de jugement composite, et changements superflus) en faveur de la surveillance immunologique et clinique ou de la surveillance virologique, immunologique et clinique par rapport à la surveillance clinique seule. Des preuves de très faible qualité issues d'études observationnelles suggéraient que la surveillance virologique, immunologique et clinique entraînait des changements de traitement plus fréquents, plus précoces et à des numérations de CD4 plus élevées que la surveillance immunologique et clinique. Des informations supplémentaires concernant les études actuellement disponibles sous forme de résumé permettront d'en savoir plus. Les études en cours examinant cette question devraient également apporter des informations permettant de mieux identifier les stratégies de surveillance efficaces pour orienter le changement de traitement de première intention. Des études examinant une surveillance virologique à différentes fréquences et/ou à différents moments après l'initiation du TARV (ex. : au bout de 2-3 ans) pourraient également être utiles. Enfin, les études d'analyse des coûts permettront de mieux évaluer l'applicabilité de ces résultats dans les environnements aux ressources limitées.

Plain language summary

Optimal monitoring strategies for guiding when to switch first-line antiretroviral therapy regimens for treatment failure among adults and adolescents living with HIV in low-resource settings

To provide the best possible care to patients with AIDS, it is important to decide correctly when to switch from one antiretroviral therapy to another for patients experiencing treatment failure. In low-resource settings, it appears that monitoring strategies which use immunologic or immunologic and virologic monitoring in addition to clinical monitoring for guiding when to switch therapy results in fewer patient deaths, fewer AIDS-defining illnesses, and fewer unnecessary switches. There is little evidence that adding virologic monitoring to immunologic monitoring has benefits. Further information on the studies, which are mostly currently reported in partial form, will give insight into this topic. Additionally, ongoing studies addressing when to switch likely will provide information to further clarify optimal monitoring strategies for guiding when to switch first-line therapy. Finally, cost-analysis studies will lend further insights into the relevance of these findings to low-resource settings.

Résumé simplifié

Stratégies de surveillance optimale pour orienter le changement de schéma antirétroviral de première intention en cas d'échec du traitement chez les adultes et les adolescents vivant avec le VIH dans des environnements aux ressources limitées

Pour apporter les meilleurs soins possibles aux patients atteints du sida, il est important de savoir choisir le bon moment pour changer de traitement antirétroviral chez les patients ne répondant pas au traitement. Dans les environnements aux ressources limitées, les stratégies utilisant une surveillance immunologique ou immunologique et virologique en plus de la surveillance clinique pour orienter le changement de traitement semblent entraîner une réduction des décès, des maladies indicatrices du sida et des changements de traitement superflus. Il existe peu de preuves d'effets bénéfiques d'une surveillance virologique en plus de la surveillance immunologique. Des informations supplémentaires concernant ces études, qui sont essentiellement documentées de manière partielle à l'heure actuelle, permettront d'en savoir plus sur cette question. Les études en cours examinant le moment optimal pour le changement de traitement devraient également apporter des informations permettant de mieux identifier les stratégies de surveillance efficaces pour orienter le changement de traitement de première intention. Enfin, les études d'analyse des coûts permettront de mieux évaluer l'applicabilité de ces résultats dans les environnements aux ressources limitées.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary