Intervention Review

Extended peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment for 72 weeks versus standard peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment for 48 weeks in chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infected slow-responder adult patients

  1. Lior H Katz1,*,
  2. Hadar Goldvaser2,
  3. Anat Gafter-Gvili3,
  4. Ran Tur-Kaspa4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 12 SEP 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008516.pub2

How to Cite

Katz LH, Goldvaser H, Gafter-Gvili A, Tur-Kaspa R. Extended peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment for 72 weeks versus standard peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment for 48 weeks in chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infected slow-responder adult patients. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD008516. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008516.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    MD Anderdson Cancer Center, Hepatology and Nutrition Department, Houston, Texas, USA

  2. 2

    Beilinson Hospital, Rabin Medical Center, Department of Oncology, Petah Tikva, Israel

  3. 3

    Beilinson Hospital, Rabin Medical Center, Department of Medicine E, Petah Tikva, Israel

  4. 4

    Beilinson Hospital, Rabin Medical Center, Department of Medicine D, Petah Tikva, Israel

*Lior H Katz, Hepatology and Nutrition Department, MD Anderdson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe st., Houston, Texas, 77030, USA. liorshlomit@yahoo.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 SEP 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The standard length of peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected patients is 48 weeks. However, the number of patients demonstrating a sustained virological response is not high. In order to improve sustained virological response, extending the length of the treatment period has been suggested.

Objectives

To study the benefits and harms of extended 72-week treatment in comparison with 48-week treatment with peginterferon plus ribavirin in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection who have shown a slow antiviral response.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and LILACS until November 2011. We identified further trials by reviewing reference lists and contacting principal authors.

Selection criteria

Trials were eligible for this review if they included patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 who had a slow antiviral response, and if those patients were randomised to completing 72 weeks versus 48 weeks of treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed the trials for risk of bias, and extracted the data. The primary outcomes were overall mortality, liver-related mortality, and liver-related morbidity. We extracted data separately according to two definitions of slow responders: 1) patients with ≥ 2 log viral reduction but still detectable HCV RNA after 12 weeks of treatment and undetectable HCV RNA after 24 weeks of treatment; 2) patients with detectable HCV RNA after four weeks of treatment. We calculated risk ratios from individual trials as well as in the meta-analyses of trials.

Main results

We included seven trials with 1369 participants. All trials had high risk of bias. Five trials used our first definition of slow responders, and three other trials (including one that used both definitions) used the second definition. None of the included trials mentioned our primary outcomes. However, regarding the secondary outcomes, extension of the treatment period to 72 weeks increased the sustained virological response according to both definitions (71/217 (32.7%) versus 52/194 (26.8%); risk ratio (RR) 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07 to 1.92, P = 0.02, I2 = 8%; and 265/499 (53.1%) versus 207/496 (41.7%); RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.50, P = 0.006, I2 = 38%), with a risk difference of 0.11 and calculated number needed to treat of nine. The end of treatment response was not significantly different between the two treatment groups. The number of participants who relapsed virologically was found to be lower in the groups that had been treated for 72 weeks using both definitions (27/84 (32.1%) versus 46/91 (50.5%); RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.86, P = 0.007, I2 = 18%, 3 trials; and 85/350 (24.3%) versus 146/353 (41.4%); RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.47, 0.73, P < 0.000001, I2 = 0%, 3 trials). The length of treatment did not significantly affect the adherence (247/279 (88.5%) versus 252/274 (92.0%); RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.07, P = 0.42, I2 = 69%, 3 trials). In the single trial that reported adverse events, no significant difference was seen between the two treatment groups.

Authors' conclusions

This review demonstrates higher a proportion of sustained virological response after extension of treatment from 48 weeks to 72 weeks in HCV genotype 1 infected patients in whom HCV RNA was still detectable but decreased by ≥ 2 log after 12 weeks and became negative after 24 weeks of treatment, and in patients with detectable HCV RNA after four weeks of treatment with peginterferon plus ribavirin. The observed intervention effects can be caused by both systematic error (bias) and random errors (play of chance). There was no reporting on mortality and the reporting of clinical outcomes and adverse events was insufficient. More data are needed in order to recommend or reject the policy of extending the treatment period for slow responders.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Extended treatment for 72 weeks versus standard treatment for 48 weeks in chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infected slow responders

Chronic hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. The standard length of treatment with peginterferon plus ribavirin for hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infected patients is 48 weeks, but the number of patients who are treated successfully with regard to disappearance of the virus from the blood (sustained virological response) is limited. In order to improve it, extending the length of the treatment period has been suggested. We attempted to identify whether extending treatment duration to 72 weeks is better than the standard 48 weeks in a subgroup of patients who have shown a slow viral response.

We found seven randomised clinical trials that compared a treatment duration of 72 weeks with 48 weeks in 1369 participants. The quality of all trials was low. Mortality and liver-related morbidity were not reported in any of the included trials. Sustained virological response (that is, undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA after six months from the end of an entire course of treatment) was increased when the decision to prolong treatment was taken based on viral load after 12 weeks of treatment (RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.92) as well as when the decision to prolong treatment was taken based on the results of the viral load after four weeks of treatment (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.50). The calculated number needed to treat to achieve an increase in sustained virological response proportions was nine (meaning that among nine participants treated for 72 weeks instead of 48 weeks, only one more will achieve a sustained virological response compared to the participants treated for 48 weeks). The higher sustained virological response after 72 weeks of treatment was caused by a reduction in the number of patients in this group who experienced a virological relapse after treatment. Adherence to treatment was not different between the two groups. Serious adverse events were mentioned in only one trial, and they were not different in the two treatment groups. The findings may be influenced by both risks of systematic errors (bias) and the risk of random errors (play of chance).

Further large-scale, randomised trials with reporting of patient relevant outcomes are warranted.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement de peginterféron plus ribavirine étendu à 72 semaines versus traitement standard de peginterféron plus ribavirine pendant 48 semaines chez les patients adultes à réponse lente infectés par le génotype 1 de l'hépatite C chronique

Contexte

La durée standard du traitement de peginterféron et ribavirine chez les patients infectés par le génotype 1 du virus de l'hépatite C (VHC) chronique est de 48 semaines. Relativement peu de patients toutefois montrent une réponse virologique soutenue. Afin d'améliorer la réponse virologique soutenue, il a été proposé d'allonger la durée du traitement.

Objectifs

Étudier les avantages et les inconvénients du traitement étendu de 72 semaines au peginterféron plus ribavirine, en comparaison au traitement de 48 semaines, chez les patients infectés par le génotype 1 du VHC chronique qui se sont avérés avoir une réponse antivirale lente.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre des essais contrôlés du groupe Cochrane hépato-biliaire, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded et LILACS jusqu'à novembre 2011. Nous avons identifié d'autres essais en passant au crible des références bibliographiques et en contactant les auteurs principaux.

Critères de sélection

Les essais étaient éligibles pour cette revue s'ils incluaient des patients infectés par le génotype 1 du virus de l'hépatite C ayant une réponse antivirale lente, et si ces patients avaient été randomisés entre des traitements de 72 et 48 semaines à l'interféron pégylé plus ribavirine.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de manière indépendante, évalué le risque de biais des essais et extrait les données. Les principaux critères de jugement étaient la mortalité globale, la mortalité liée au foie et la morbidité liée au foie. Nous avons extrait les données séparément pour deux définitions de la réponse lente : 1) des patients ayant une réduction virale ≥ 2 logarithmique mais de l'ARN de VHC toujours détectable après 12 semaines de traitement, bien que plus détectable après 24 semaines de traitement ; 2) des patients ayant de l'ARN de VHC détectable après quatre semaines de traitement. Nous avons calculé les risques relatifs, tant pour chaque essai que pour les méta-analyses d'essais.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus sept essais totalisant 1 369 participants. Tous les essais présentaient des risques élevés de biais. Cinq essais avaient utilisé notre première définition de la réponse lente, et les trois autres essais (dont un qui avait utilisé les deux définitions) la seconde définition. Aucun des essais inclus n'avait fait mention de nos principaux critères de jugement. Toutefois, en ce qui concerne les critères secondaires de jugement, l'extension à 72 semaines de la durée du traitement avait augmenté la réponse virologique soutenue selon les deux définitions (71/217 (32,7 %) versus 52/194 (26,8 %) ; risque relatif (RR) 1,43 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 1,07 à 1,92 , P = 0,02 , I2 = 8 % ; et 265/499 (53,1 %) versus 207/496 (41,7 %) ; RR 1,27 , IC à 95 % 1,07 à 1,50 , P = 0,006 , I2 = 38 %), avec une différence de risque de 0,11 et un nombre calculé de sujets à traiter de neuf. La fin de la réponse au traitement n'était pas significativement différente entre les deux groupes de traitement. Le nombre de participants ayant rechuté virologiquement s'est avéré être plus faible dans les groupes qui avaient été traités pendant 72 semaines, selon les deux définitions (27/84 (32,1 %) versus 46/91 (50,5 %) ; RR 0,59 , IC à 95 % 0,40 à 0,86 , P = 0,007 , I2 = 18 %, 3 essais ; et 85/350 (24,3 %) versus 146/353 (41,4 %) ; RR 0,59 , IC à 95 % 0,47 à 0,73 , P <0,000001 , I2 = 0 %, 3 essais). La durée du traitement n'avait pas significativement influencé l'observance (247/279 (88,5 %) versus 252/274 (92,0 %) ; RR 0,95 , IC à 95 % 0,84 à 1,07 , P = 0,42, I2 = 69 %, 3 essais). Dans le seul essai qui avait rendu compte des effets indésirables, aucune différence significative n'avait été observée entre les deux groupes de traitement.

Conclusions des auteurs

Cette revue montre une proportion plus élevée de réponse virologique soutenue après extension du traitement de 48 à 72 semaines pour les patients infectés du génotype 1 du VHC chez qui de l'ARN de VHC était toujours détectable, bien qu'ayant diminué de ≥ 2 log après 12 semaines et n'était plus détectable après 24 semaines de traitement, ainsi que chez les patients chez qui de l'ARN de VHC était détectable après quatre semaines de traitement par peginterféron plus ribavirine. Les effets observés de l'intervention peuvent être dus tant à une erreur systématique (biais) qu'à des erreurs aléatoires (effet de hasard). Il n'y avait pas de compte-rendu de la mortalité et le compte-rendu des résultats cliniques et des événements indésirables était insuffisant. Davantage de données sont nécessaires pour recommander ou rejeter la politique d'extension de la durée de traitement chez les patients à réponse lente.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement de peginterféron plus ribavirine étendu à 72 semaines versus traitement standard de peginterféron plus ribavirine pendant 48 semaines chez les patients adultes à réponse lente infectés par le génotype 1 de l'hépatite C chronique

Traitement étendu à 72 semaines versus traitement standard de 48 semaines pour les personnes à réponse lente infectées par le génotype 1 de l'hépatite C chronique

L'hépatite C chronique est une cause majeure de morbidité et de mortalité liées au foie. La durée standard du traitement au peginterféron et ribavirine pour les patients infectés par le génotype 1 du virus de l'hépatite C est de 48 semaines, mais le nombre de patients chez qui le traitement réussit à faire disparaitre le virus du sang (réponse virologique soutenue) est limité. Afin d'améliorer ces résultats, il a été proposé d'allonger la durée du traitement. Nous avons tenté de déterminer si la prolongation à 72 semaines de la durée de traitement est préférable aux 48 semaines standard pour le sous-groupe de patients qui se sont avérés répondre lentement au virus.

Nous avons trouvé sept essais cliniques randomisés ayant comparé les durées de traitement de 72 semaines et 48 semaines chez 1 369 participants. La qualité de tous les essais était faible. Aucun des essais inclus n'avait rendu compte de la mortalité ou de la morbidité liée au foie. La réponse virologique soutenue (c'est-à-dire l'indétectabilité d'ARN du virus de l'hépatite C six mois après la fin d'un traitement complet) avait augmenté lorsqu'il avait été décidé, sur la base de la charge virale après 12 semaines de traitement, de prolonger le traitement (RR 1,43 ; IC à 95 % 1,07 à 1,92) ainsi que lorsqu'il avait été décidé de prolonger le traitement sur la base des résultats de charge virale après quatre semaines de traitement (RR 1,27 ; IC à 95 % 1,07 à 1,50). Le nombre calculé de sujets à traiter pour obtenir une augmentation des proportions de réponse virologique soutenue était de neuf (ce qui signifie que sur neuf participants traités pendant 72 semaines au lieu de 48 semaines seul un de plus atteindrait une réponse virologique soutenue, en comparaison avec les participants traités pendant 48 semaines). L'amélioration de la réponse virologique soutenue après 72 semaines de traitement était due à la réduction du nombre de patients de ce groupe ayant fait l'objet d'une rechute virologique après le traitement. Il n'y avait pas de différence entre les deux groupes quant à l'observance du traitement. Des événements indésirables graves n'ont été mentionnés que dans un seul essai, et ils ne différaient pas entre les deux groupes de traitement. Les résultats peuvent avoir été influencés par les risques d'erreurs systématiques (biais) et le risque d'erreurs aléatoires (effet de hasard).

De nouveaux essais randomisés à grande échelle rendant compte de critères de jugement concernant les patients sont nécessaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 30th October, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français