Intervention Review

Vaccines for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea: vaccines in use

  1. Karla Soares-Weiser1,*,
  2. Harriet MacLehose2,
  3. Hanna Bergman1,
  4. Irit Ben-Aharon3,
  5. Sukrti Nagpal4,
  6. Elad Goldberg5,
  7. Femi Pitan6,
  8. Nigel Cunliffe7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008521.pub3


How to Cite

Soares-Weiser K, MacLehose H, Bergman H, Ben-Aharon I, Nagpal S, Goldberg E, Pitan F, Cunliffe N. Vaccines for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea: vaccines in use. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD008521. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008521.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Enhance Reviews Ltd, Wantage, UK

  2. 2

    The Cochrane Collaboration, Cochrane Editorial Unit, London, UK

  3. 3

    Enhance Reviews, Kfar-Saba, Israel

  4. 4

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK

  5. 5

    Beilinson Hospital, Rabin Medical Center, Department of Medicine E, Petah Tikva, Israel

  6. 6

    Chevron Corporation, Lagos, Nigeria

  7. 7

    University of Liverpool, Institute of Infection and Global Health, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Liverpool, UK

*Karla Soares-Weiser, Enhance Reviews Ltd, Central Office, Cobweb Buildings, The Lane, Lyford, Wantage, OX12 0EE, UK. karla@enhance-reviews.com. ksoaresweiser@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Rotavirus results in more diarrhoea-related deaths in children less than five years of age than any other single agent in countries with high childhood mortality. It is also a common cause of diarrhoea-related hospital admissions in countries with low childhood mortality. Currently licensed rotavirus vaccines include a monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1; Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) and a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5; RotaTeq, Merck & Co., Inc.). Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine (LLR; Lanzhou Institute of Biomedical Products) is used in China only.

Objectives

To evaluate rotavirus vaccines approved for use (RV1, RV5, and LLR) for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea.

Search methods

We searched MEDLINE (via PubMed) (1966 to May 2012), the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (10 May 2012), CENTRAL (published in The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 5), EMBASE (1974 to 10 May 2012), LILACS (1982 to 10 May 2012), and BIOSIS (1926 to 10 May 2012). We also searched the ICTRP (10 May 2012), www.ClinicalTrials.gov (28 May 2012) and checked reference lists of identified studies.

Selection criteria

We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in children comparing rotavirus vaccines approved for use with placebo, no intervention, or another vaccine.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We combined dichotomous data using the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We stratified the analysis by child mortality, and used GRADE to evaluate evidence quality.

Main results

Forty-one trials met the inclusion criteria and enrolled a total of 186,263 participants. Twenty-nine trials (101,671 participants) assessed RV1, and 12 trials (84,592 participants) evaluated RV5. We did not find any trials assessing LLR.

RV1

Children aged less than one year: In countries with low-mortality rates, RV1 prevents 86% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea cases (RR 0.14, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.26; 40,631 participants, six trials; high-quality evidence), and, based on one large multicentre trial in Latin America and Finland, probably prevents 40% of severe all-cause diarrhoea episodes (rate ratio 0.60, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.72; 17,867 participants, one trial; moderate-quality evidence). In countries with high-mortality rates, RV1 probably prevents 63% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea cases (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.75; 5414 participants, two trials; moderate-quality evidence), and, based on one trial in Malawi and South Africa, 34% of severe all-cause diarrhoea cases (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.98; 4939 participants, one trial; moderate-quality evidence).

Children aged up to two years: In countries with low-mortality rates, RV1 prevents 85% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea cases (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.20; 32,854 participants, eight trials; high-quality evidence), and probably 37% of severe all-cause diarrhoea episodes (rate ratio 0.63, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.71; 39,091 participants, two trials; moderate-quality evidence). In countries with high-mortality rates, based on one trial in Malawi and South Africa, RV1 probably prevents 42% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea cases (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.79; 2764 participants, one trial; moderate-quality evidence), and 18% of severe all-cause diarrhoea cases (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.95; 2764 participants, one trial; moderate-quality evidence).

RV5

Children aged less than one year: In countries with low-mortality rates, RV5 probably prevents 87% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea cases (RR 0.13, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.45; 2344 participants, three trials; moderate-quality evidence), and, based on one trial in Finland, may prevent 72% of severe all-cause diarrhoea cases (RR 0.28, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.48; 1029 participants, one trial; low-quality evidence). In countries with high-mortality rates, RV5 prevents 57% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea (RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.62; 5916 participants, two trials; high-quality evidence), but there was insufficient data to assess the effect on severe all-cause diarrhoea.

Children aged up to two years: Four studies provided data for severe rotavirus and all-cause diarrhoea in countries with low-mortality rates. Three trials reported on severe rotavirus diarrhoea cases and found that RV5 probably prevents 82% (RR 0.18, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.50; 3190 participants, three trials; moderate-quality evidence), and another trial in Finland reported on severe all-cause diarrhoea cases and found that RV5 may prevent 96% (RR 0.04, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.70; 1029 participants, one trial; low-quality evidence). In high-mortality countries, RV5 prevents 41% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea cases (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.82; 5885 participants, two trials; high-quality evidence), and 15% of severe all-cause diarrhoea cases (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.98; 5977 participants, two trials; high-quality evidence).

There was no evidence of a vaccine effect on mortality (181,009 participants, 34 trials; low-quality evidence), although the trials were not powered to detect an effect on this end point.

Serious adverse events were reported in 4565 out of 99,438 children vaccinated with RV1 and in 1884 out of 78,226 children vaccinated with RV5. Fifty-eight cases of intussusception were reported in 97,246 children after RV1 vaccination, and 34 cases in 81,459 children after RV5 vaccination. No significant difference was found between children receiving RV1 or RV5 and placebo in the number of serious adverse events, and intussusception in particular.

Authors' conclusions

RV1 and RV5 prevent episodes of rotavirus diarrhoea. The vaccine efficacy is lower in high-mortality countries; however, due to the higher burden of disease, the absolute benefit is higher in these settings. No increased risk of serious adverse events including intussusception was detected, but post-introduction surveillance studies are required to detect rare events associated with vaccination.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Vaccines for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea: vaccines in use

Rotavirus infection is a common cause of diarrhoea in infants and young children, and can cause mild illness, hospitalization, and death. Rotavirus infections results in approximately half a million deaths per year in children aged under five years, mainly in low- and middle-income countries. Since 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that a rotavirus vaccine be included in all national immunization programmes.

This review evaluates a monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1; Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) and a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5; RotaTeq, Merck & Co., Inc.). These vaccines have been evaluated in several large trials and are approved for use in many countries. No trials of the Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine (LLR; Lanzhou Institute of Biomedical Products) were found; this vaccine is used in China only. The review includes 41 trials with 186,263 participants; all trials compared a rotavirus vaccine with placebo. The vaccines tested were RV1 (29 trials with 101,671 participants) and RV5 (12 trials with 84,592 participants). The trials took place in a number of worldwide locations.

In the first two years of life, RV1 prevented more than 80% of severe cases of rotavirus diarrhoea in low-mortality countries, and at least 40% of severe rotavirus diarrhoea in high-mortality countries. Severe cases of diarrhoea from all causes (such as any viral infection, bacterial infections, toxins, or allergies) were reduced after vaccination with RV1 by 35 to 40% in low-mortality countries, and 15 to 30% in high-mortality countries.

In the first two years of life, RV5 reduced severe cases of rotavirus diarrhoea by more than 80% in low-mortality countries, and by 40 to 57% in high-mortality countries. Severe cases of diarrhoea from all causes were reduced by 73% to 96% in low-mortality countries, and 15% in high-mortality countries, after vaccination with RV5. Diarrhoea is more common in high-mortality countries, so even modest relative effects prevent more episodes in this population. The vaccines when tested against placebo gave similar numbers of adverse events such as reactions to the vaccine, and other events that required discontinuation of the vaccination schedule.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les vaccins dans la prévention des diarrhées à rotavirus : vaccins utilisés

Contexte

Le rotavirus provoque plus de décès liées à des diarrhées chez les enfants de moins de cinq ans que tout autre agent dans les pays à forte mortalité infantile. Il est également une cause fréquente d’hospitalisation pour diarrhées dans les pays à faible mortalité infantile. Les vaccins antirotavirus autorisé sur le marché comprennent actuellement un vaccin antirotavirus monovalent (RV1 ; Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) et un vaccin antirotavirus pentavalent (RV5 ; RotaTeq, Merck & Co., Inc.). Le vaccin antirotavirus d’agneau de Lanzhou (LLR ; Lanzhou Institute of Biomedical Products) est utilisé uniquement en Chine.

Objectifs

Évaluer les vaccins antirotavirus autorisés sur le marché (RV1, le RV5 et LLR) pour la prévention des diarrhées à rotavirus.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans MEDLINE (via PubMed) (de 1966 à mai 2012), le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses (10 mai 2012), CENTRAL (publiée dans la Bibliothèque Cochrane 2012, numéro 5), EMBASE (de 1974 à 10 mai 2012), LILACS (de 1982 au 10 mai 2012) et BIOSIS (1926 à 10 mai 2012). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans le ICTRP (10 mai 2012), www.ClinicalTrials.gov (28 mai 2012), et examiné les références bibliographiques des études identifiées.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) chez les enfants comparant des vaccins antirotavirus autorisés sur le marché à un placebo, à l’absence d’intervention ou à un autre vaccin.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué indépendamment l’éligibilité des essais, extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais. Nous avons combiné les données dichotomiques en utilisant le risque relatif (RR) et les intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %. Nous avons stratifié l’analyse par la mortalité infantile, et avons utilisé le système GRADE pour évaluer la qualité des preuves.

Résultats Principaux

Quarante essais remplissaient les critères d’inclusion et portaient sur un total de 186 263 participants. Vingt-neuf essais (101 671 participants) évaluaient le RV1 et 12 essais (84 592 participants) évaluaient le RV5. Nous avons n’ont trouve aucun essai évaluant le LLR.

RV1

Enfants de moins d’un an :Dans les pays à faible taux de mortalité, le RV1 prévient 86 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus (RR 0,14, IC à 95 % de 0,07 à 0,26 ; 40 631 participants, six essais ; preuves de qualité élevée) ; d’après un grand essai multicentrique réalisé en Amérique Latine et en Finlande, il prévient probablement 40 % de graves épisodes de diarrhée toutes causes confondues (rapport des taux de 0,60, IC à 95 % de 0,50 à 0,72 ; 17 867 participants, un essai ; preuves de qualité moyenne). Dans les pays à fort taux de mortalité, le RV1 prévient probablement 63 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus (RR 0,37, IC à 95 % de 0,18 à 0,75 ; 5414 participants, deux essais ; preuves de qualité moyenne) et, d’après un essai réalisé au Malawi et en Afrique du Sud, 34 % des cas graves de diarrhée toutes causes confondues (RR 0,66, IC à 95 % de 0,44 à 0,98 ; 4939 participants, un essai ; preuves de qualité moyenne).

Enfants jusqu’à deux ans :Dans les pays à faible taux de mortalité, le RV1 prévient 85 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus (RR 0,15, IC à 95 % de 0,12 à 0,20 ; 32 854 participants, huit essais ; preuves de qualité élevée) et probablement 37 % des épisodes de diarrhée grave toutes causes confondues (rapport des taux de 0,63, IC à 95 % de 0,56 à 0,71 ; 39 091 participants, deux essais ; preuves de qualité moyenne). Dans les pays à fort taux de mortalité, d’après un essai mené au Malawi et en Afrique du Sud, le RV1 prévient probablement 42 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus (RR 0,58, IC à 95 % de 0,42 à 0,79 ; 2764 participants, un essai ; preuves de qualité moyenne) et 18 % des cas graves de diarrhée toutes causes confondues (RR 0,82, IC à 95 % de 0,71 à 0,95 ; 2764 participants, un essai ; preuves de qualité moyenne).

RV5

Enfants de moins d’un an : Dans les pays à faible taux de mortalité, le RV5 prévient probablement 87 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus (RR 0,13, IC à 95 % de 0,04 à 0,45 ; 2344 participants, trois essais ; preuves de qualité moyenne) et, d’après un essai réalisé en Finlande, pourrait prévenir 72 % des cas graves de diarrhée toutes causes confondues (RR 0,28, IC à 95 % de 0,16 à 0,48 ; 1 029 participants, un essai ; preuves de faible qualité). Dans les pays à fort taux de mortalité, il prévient 57 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus (RR 0,43, IC à 95 % de 0,29 à 0,62 ; 5916 participants, deux essais ; preuves de qualité élevée), mais il n’y a pas suffisamment de données pour évaluer l’effet sur les diarrhées sévères toutes causes confondues.

Enfants jusqu’à deux ans :Quatre études ont fourni des données sur les diarrhées sévères associées au rotavirus et toutes causes confondues dans les pays à faible taux de mortalité. Trois essais ont rendu compte de cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus et observé que le RV5 prévenait probablement 82 % des cas (RR 0,18, IC à 95 % de 0,07 à 0,50 ; 3190 participants, trois essais ; preuves de qualité moyenne), et un autre essai mené en Finlande et rendant compte des cas de diarrhée sévère toutes causes confondues montre que le RV5 pourrait prévenir 96 % des cas (RR 0,04, IC à 95 % de 0,00 à 0,70 ; 1 029 participants, un essai ; preuves de faible qualité). Dans les pays à forte mortalité, le RV5 prévient 41 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus (RR 0,59, IC à 95 % de 0,43 à 0,82 ; 5885 participants, deux essais ; preuves de qualité élevée) et 15 % des diarrhées graves toutes causes confondues (RR 0,85, IC à 95 % de 0,75 à 0,98 ; 5977 participants, deux essais ; preuves de qualité élevée).

Il n’y avait aucune preuve d’un effet du vaccin sur la mortalité (181 009 participants, 34 essais ; preuves de faible qualité), mais les essais n’avaient pas une puissance suffisante pour détecter un effet sur ce critère de jugement.

Des événements indésirables graves ont été rapportés chez 4565 enfants vaccinés avec le RV1sur 99 438 et chez 1884 enfants vaccinés avec le RV5 sur 78 226. Cinquante-huit cas d’invagination intestinale ont été rapportés sur 97 246 après la vaccination par le RV1, et 34 cas sur 81 459 enfants vaccinés avec le RV5. Aucune différence significative n’a été observée entre les enfants recevant le RV1 ou le RV5 et un placebo en termes de nombre d’événements indésirables graves, et en particulier d’invagination intestinale.

Conclusions des auteurs

Le RV1 et le RV5 préviennent les épisodes de diarrhée à rotavirus. L’efficacité du vaccin est plus faible dans les pays à forte mortalité mais, comme le fardeau de la maladie est plus lourd dans ces pays, le bénéfice absolu de la vaccination y est aussi plus grand. Aucun risque accru d’événements indésirables graves, notamment d’invagination intestinale, n’a été détecté, mais des études de surveillance post-introduction sont nécessaires afin de détecter les événements rares associés à la vaccination.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les vaccins dans la prévention des diarrhées à rotavirus : vaccins utilisés

Les vaccins dans la prévention des diarrhées à rotavirus : vaccins utilisés

L’infection à rotavirus est une cause fréquente de diarrhée chez les nourrissons et les jeunes enfants ; ses effets peuvent aller de troubles bénins à l’hospitalisation et au décès. Les infections à rotavirus provoquent environ un demi-million de décès par an chez les enfants de moins de cinq ans, principalement dans les pays à faibles et moyens revenus. Depuis 2009, l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS) recommande d’inclure un vaccin contre le rotavirus dans tous les programmes nationaux de vaccination.

Cette revue évalue un vaccin antirotavirus monovalent (RV1 ; Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) et un vaccin antirotavirus pentavalent (RV5 ; RotaTeq, Merck & Co., Inc.). Ces vaccins ont été évalués dans plusieurs essais de grande envergure et sont autorisés dans de nombreux pays. Nous n’avons trouvé aucun essai du vaccin au rotavirus d’agneau de Lanzhou (LLR ; Lanzhou Institute of Biomedical Products), qui est utilisé uniquement en Chine. La revue inclut 41 essais totalisant 186 263 participants ; tous les essais comparaient un vaccin contre le rotavirus à un placebo. Les vaccins testés étaient le RV1 (29 essais totalisant 101 671 participants) et le RV5 (12 essais totalisant 84 592 participants). Les essais se sont déroulés dans un certain nombre d’endroits à travers le monde.

Dans les deux premières années de vie, le RV1 a évité plus de 80 % des cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus dans les pays à faible mortalité et au moins 40 % dans les pays à forte mortalité. Les cas graves de diarrhée toutes causes confondues (une infection virale, infection bactérienne, toxines ou allergies) diminuaient après la vaccination avec le RV1, de 35 à 40 % dans les pays à faible mortalité et 15 à 30 % dans les pays à forte mortalité.

Dans les deux premières années de vie, le RV5 a réduit les cas graves de diarrhée à rotavirus de plus de 80 % dans les pays à faible mortalité, et de 40 à 57% dans les pays à forte mortalité. Les cas graves de diarrhée toutes causes confondues ont été réduits de 73 % à 96% dans les pays à faible mortalité, et de 15 % dans les pays à haute mortalité après la vaccination avec le RV5. Les diarrhées sont plus fréquente dans les pays à forte mortalité, de sorte que même des effets relatifs modestes empêchent une recrudescence d’épisodes dans cette population. Lorsque les vaccins étaient testés par rapport à un placebo, ils ont donné un nombre similaire d’événements indésirables tels que des réactions au vaccin et d’autres effets imposant l’arrêt de la vaccination.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 9th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français