This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (12 AUG 2014)

Intervention Review

Interventions for congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot)

  1. Kelly Gray1,*,
  2. Verity Pacey1,
  3. Paul Gibbons2,
  4. David Little2,
  5. Chris Frost3,
  6. Joshua Burns4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 18 APR 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 4 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008602.pub2


How to Cite

Gray K, Pacey V, Gibbons P, Little D, Frost C, Burns J. Interventions for congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD008602. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008602.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Department of Physiotherapy, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia

  2. 2

    The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia

  3. 3

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Department of Medical Statistics, London, UK

  4. 4

    and Institute for Neuroscience and Muscle Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia

*Kelly Gray, Department of Physiotherapy, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead, New South Wales, 2145, Australia. kellye@chw.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 APR 2012

SEARCH

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (12 AUG 2014)

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV), which is also known as clubfoot, is a common congenital orthopaedic condition. It is characterised by an excessively turned in foot (equinovarus) and high medial longitudinal arch (cavus). If left untreated it can result in long-term disability, deformity and pain. Interventions can be conservative (such as splinting or stretching) or surgical.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for CTEV.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (2011, Issue 2), NHSEED (2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2011), CINAHL Plus (January 1937 to April 2011), AMED (1985 to April 2011) and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro to April 2011). We checked the references of included studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials evaluating interventions for CTEV. Participants were people of all ages with CTEV of either one or both feet.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed risk of bias in included trials and extracted the data. We contacted authors of included trials for missing information. We collected adverse event information from trials when it was available.

Main results

We identified 13 trials in which there were 507 participants. The use of different outcome measures prevented pooling of data for meta-analysis even when interventions and participants were comparable. All trials displayed bias in four or more areas. One trial reported on the primary outcome of function, though raw data were not available to be analysed. We were able to analyse data on foot alignment (Pirani score), a secondary outcome, from three trials. The Pirani score is scored from zero to six, in which higher is worse. Two of the trials involved participants at initial presentation. One of them reported that the Ponseti technique significantly improved foot alignment compared to the Kite technique. After 10 weeks of serial casting, the average total Pirani score of the Ponseti group was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 0.98 to 1.32) lower than that of the Kite group. The second trial found the Ponseti technique to be superior to a traditional technique, with average total Pirani scores of the Ponseti participants 1.50 lower (95% confidence interval 0.72 to 2.28) after serial casting and Achilles tenotomy. A trial in which the type of presentation was not reported found no difference between an accelerated Ponseti or standard Ponseti treatment. At the end of serial casting, the average total Pirani scores in the standard group were 0.31 lower (95% confidence interval -0.40 to 1.02) than the accelerated group. Adverse events were not compared in the trial. There is a lack of evidence for different plaster casting products or the addition of botulinum toxin A during the Ponseti technique. There is also a lack of evidence for different types of major foot surgery for CTEV, continuous passive motion treatment following major foot surgery, or treatment of relapsed or neglected cases of CTEV. Most trials did not report on adverse events. In trials evaluating serial casting techniques, adverse events included cast slippage (needing replacement), plaster sores (pressure areas) and skin irritation. Adverse events following surgical procedures included infection and the need for skin grafting.

Authors' conclusions

From the limited evidence available, the Ponseti technique may produce better short-term outcomes compared to the Kite technique. An accelerated Ponseti technique may be as effective as a standard technique. We could draw no conclusions from other included trials because of the limited use of validated outcome measures and lack of available raw data. Future randomised controlled trials should address these issues.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions for congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot)

Clubfoot is a structural bony deformity of the foot of unknown cause. There are numerous treatments, depending upon age and presentation. Four areas of research into treatments are emerging: initial presentation; resistant presentation (when initial treatment is not successful and other treatments are required); relapsed/recurrent presentation (when there has been good initial correction, but the deformity returns); and neglected presentation (when there has been no early treatment).

Management can be non-surgical (conservative), surgical or both. Conservative treatment (for example plaster casting or stretches) gently stretches the foot into normal alignment. Surgical procedures can be major (involving the joints of the foot) or minor (not involving the joints).

From our searches we identified 13 trials with 507 participants. All trials were at risk of bias in at least four areas. One trial reported on the main outcome of function, though raw data were not available for analysis. Of the two trials of interventions at initial presentation, one compared two different stretching techniques using a series of plaster casts. It reported better short-term outcomes of the Ponseti over the Kite technique for foot alignment. Similar rates of relapse were reported for both techniques but the majority of the Ponseti group corrected with further serial casting while the majority of the Kite group required major foot surgery. Another trial reported superior short-term outcomes for foot alignment with the Ponseti technique at initial presentation over a traditional technique (plaster casting, major surgery). One trial (type of presentation not reported) showed an accelerated Ponseti technique to be as effective as a standard technique. Adverse events were not compared in the trial. There is a lack of evidence on the addition of botulinum toxin A to the Ponseti technique, the use of different types of plaster casts during the Ponseti technique, major types of foot surgery, or treatment of relapsed or neglected cases of clubfoot. Most trials did not report on adverse events. In trials evaluating serial casting, adverse events included cast slippage (with a need for replacement), plaster sores and skin irritation. Adverse events after surgery included infection and a need for skin grafting.

While the primary outcome of function could not be addressed, short-term outcomes show a reduction of major foot surgery in the Ponseti groups. Further well designed randomised controlled trials are required to confirm these findings. There is currently limited evidence to confidently conclude which is the best intervention in each case.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour pied bot varus équin congénital (pied bot)

Contexte

Le pied bot varus équin congénital (PBVEC), appelé plus simplement « pied bot », est une pathologie orthopédique congénitale commune. Il est caractérisé par un pied trop courbé (varus équin) et une voûte longitudinale médiane accentuée. S'il n'est pas traité il peut être cause d'infirmité, de difformité et de douleurs sur le long terme. Les interventions peuvent être conservatrices (comme la contention ou l'étirement) ou chirurgicales.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des interventions pour le PBVEC.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans CENTRAL (2011, numéro 2), NHSEED (2011, numéro 2), MEDLINE (de janvier 1966 à avril 2011), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à avril 2011), CINAHL Plus (de janvier 1937 à avril 2011), AMED (de 1985 à avril 2011) et PEDro (jusqu'à avril 2011). Nous avons vérifié les références bibliographiques des études incluses.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés et quasi-randomisés évaluant des interventions pour le PBVEC. Les participants étaient des personnes de tous âges ayant un ou deux PBVEC.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de manière indépendante, évalué les risques de biais des études incluses et extrait les données. Nous avons contacté des auteurs d'essais inclus pour obtenir des informations manquantes. Nous avons recueilli les informations sur les événements indésirables quand elles étaient disponibles.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié 13 essais impliquant au total 507 participants. L'utilisation de différentes mesures de résultat a empêché le regroupement des données pour méta-analyse, même quand les interventions et les participants étaient comparables. Tous les essais présentaient des biais dans au moins quatre domaines. Un essai avait rendu compte du principal critère de jugement qu'est la fonction, mais les données brutes n'étaient pas disponibles pour analyse. Nous avons pu analyser les données sur l'alignement du pied (score Pirani), un critère de jugement secondaire, pour trois essais. Le score de Pirani est compris entre zéro et six, le plus élevé étant le plus mauvais. Deux des essais portaient sur des participants en présentation initiale. L'un d'eux avait rapporté que la technique de Ponseti, en comparaison avec la technique de Kite, améliorait considérablement l'alignement du pied Après 10 semaines de plâtres successifs, la moyenne du score total de Pirani dans le groupe Ponseti était inférieure de 1,15 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % 0,98 à 1,32) à celle du groupe Kite. Le second essai avait constaté que la technique de Ponseti était supérieure à une technique traditionnelle, avec une moyenne du score total de Pirani dans le groupe Ponseti plus basse de 1,50 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % 0,72 à 2,28) après plâtres successifs et ténotomie d'Achille. Un essai dans lequel le type de présentation n'était pas rapporté n'avait pas trouvé de différence entre le traitement de Ponseti standard et sa version accélérée. Après des plâtres successifs, la moyenne du score total de Pirani dans le groupe standard était plus basse de 0,31 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % -0,40 à 1,02) que dans le groupe accéléré. Dans cet essai les événements indésirables n'étaient pas comparés. On manque de preuves sur différents produits de séries de plâtres et sur l'ajout de toxine botulique A dans le cadre de la technique de Ponseti. On manque également de preuves sur différents types de chirurgie majeure pour PBVEC, sur le traitement par mouvement passif continu après chirurgie majeure du pied et sur le traitement de PBVEC récurrents ou négligés. La plupart des essais n'avaient pas rendu compte des événements indésirables. Dans les essais évaluant différentes série de plâtres, les événements indésirables comprenaient le glissement du plâtre (nécessitant son remplacement), les plaies de plâtre (zones de pression) et l'irritation de la peau. Les événements indésirables après procédures chirurgicales incluaient l'infection et le besoin d'une greffe de peau.

Conclusions des auteurs

D'après les données disponibles, la technique de Ponseti pourrait produire de meilleurs résultats à court terme que la technique de Kite. Une technique de Ponseti accélérée pourrait être aussi efficace qu'une technique standard. Nous n'avons pas pu tirer de conclusions des autres essais inclus en raison de l'utilisation limitée de mesures de résultat validées et du manque de données brutes. De nouveaux essais contrôlés randomisés devraient aborder ces questions.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour pied bot varus équin congénital (pied bot)

Interventions pour pied bot varus équin congénital (pied bot)

Le pied bot est une déformation osseuse structurelle du pied dont on ne connait pas la cause. Il existe de nombreux traitements, en fonction de l'âge et de la présentation. Quatre domaines de recherche sur les traitements émergent : la présentation initiale, la présentation résistante (lorsque le traitement initial n'a pas réussi et que d'autres traitements sont nécessaires), la présentation récurrente (quand il y a eu une bonne correction initiale mais que la déformation revient) et la présentation négligée (quand il n'y a pas eu de traitement précoce).

La prise en charge peut être non-chirurgicale (conservatrice), chirurgicale ou les deux à la fois. Un traitement conservateur (par exemple plâtre ou attelles) étire doucement le pied vers l'alignement normal. Les procédures chirurgicales peuvent être majeures (impliquant les articulations du pied) ou mineures (n'impliquant pas les articulations).

Nos recherches nous ont permis d'identifier 13 essais totalisant 507 participants. Tous les essais présentaient des risques de biais dans au moins quatre domaines. Un essai avait rendu compte du principal critère de jugement qu'est la fonction, bien que les données brutes n'étaient pas disponibles pour analyse. Parmi les deux essais sur des interventions en présentation initiale, l'un avait comparé deux différentes techniques d'étirement à l'aide de plâtres successifs. Il avait rendu compte de meilleurs résultats à court terme avec la technique Ponseti d'alignement du pied qu'avec la technique de Kite. Des taux similaires de récurrence ont été rapportés pour les deux techniques, mais la majorité du groupe Ponseti avait été corrigée à l'aide de plâtres successifs supplémentaires alors que la majorité du groupe Kite avait nécessité une opération chirurgicale majeure du pied. Un autre essai avait rapporté de meilleurs résultats à court terme pour l'alignement des pieds en présentation initiale avec la technique de Ponseti qu'avec une technique traditionnelle (plâtre, intervention chirurgicale majeure). Un essai (type de présentation non précisé) avait montré qu'une technique de Ponseti accélérée était aussi efficace qu'une technique standard. Dans cet essai les événements indésirables n'étaient pas comparés. On manque de preuves concernant l'ajout de toxine botulique A à la technique de Ponseti, l'utilisation de différents types de plâtres dans le cadre de la technique de Ponseti, les principaux types de chirurgie du pied et le traitement des cas récurrents ou négligés de pied bot. La plupart des essais n'avaient pas rendu compte des événements indésirables. Dans les essais évaluant des séries de plâtres, les événements indésirables comprenaient le glissement du plâtre (nécessitant son remplacement), les plaies de plâtre et l'irritation de la peau. Les événements indésirables après chirurgie incluaient l'infection et le besoin d'une greffe de peau.

Bien que le principal critère de jugement, la fonction, n'ait pas pu être examiné, les résultats à court terme montrent une réduction de la chirurgie majeure du pied dans les groupes Ponseti. De nouveaux essais contrôlés randomisés bien conçus sont nécessaires pour confirmer ces résultats. Les données disponibles ne sont pas suffisantes pour établir avec assurance quelle est la meilleure intervention dans chaque cas.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st June, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français