Intervention Review

Incentives for preventing smoking in children and adolescents

  1. Vanessa Johnston1,*,
  2. Selma Liberato2,
  3. David Thomas1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group

Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 14 JUN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008645.pub2


How to Cite

Johnston V, Liberato S, Thomas D. Incentives for preventing smoking in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD008645. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008645.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Menzies School of Health Research, Preventable Chronic Diseases Division, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

  2. 2

    Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Nutrition Research Team, Darwin, NT, Australia

*Vanessa Johnston, Preventable Chronic Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096 Casuarina, Darwin, Northern Territory, 0810, Australia. vanessa.johnston@menzies.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Background

Adult smoking usually has its roots in adolescence. If individuals do not take up smoking during this period it is unlikely that they ever will. Further, once smoking becomes established, cessation is challenging; the probability of subsequently quitting is inversely proportional to the age of initiation. One novel approach to reducing the prevalence of youth smoking is the use of incentives.

Objectives

To determine whether incentives prevent children and adolescents from starting to smoke. We also attempted to assess the dose-response of incentives, the costs of incentive programmes, whether incentives are more or less effective in combination with other interventions to prevent smoking initiation and any unintended consequences arising from the use of incentives.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register, with additional searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CSA databases and PsycINFO for terms relating to incentives, in combination with terms for smoking and tobacco use, and children and adolescents. The most recent searches were in May 2012.

Selection criteria

We considered randomized controlled trials allocating children and adolescents (aged 5 to 18 years) as individuals, groups or communities to intervention or control conditions, where the intervention included an incentive aimed at preventing smoking uptake. We also considered controlled trials with baseline measures and post-intervention outcomes.

Data collection and analysis

Data were extracted by two authors and assessed independently. The primary outcome was the smoking status of children or adolescents at follow-up who reported no smoking at baseline. We required a minimum follow-up of six months from baseline and assessed each included study for risk of bias. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial; we did not require biochemical validation of self-reported tobacco use for study inclusion. Where possible we combined eligible studies to calculate pooled estimates at the longest follow-up using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect method, grouping studies by study design.

Main results

We identified seven controlled studies that met our inclusion criteria, including participants with an age range of 11 to 14 years. Of the seven trials identified, only five had analysable data relevant for this review and contributed to the meta-analysis (6362 participants in total who were non-smokers at baseline; 3466 in intervention and 2896 in control). All bar one of the studies was a trial of the so-called Smokefree Class Competition (SFC), which has been widely implemented throughout Europe. In this competition, classes with youth generally between the ages of 11 to 14 years commit to being smoke free for a six month period. They report regularly on their smoking status; if 90% or more of the class is non-smoking at the end of the six months, the class goes into a competition to win prizes. The one study that was not a trial of the SFC was a controlled trial in which schools in two communities were assigned to the intervention, with schools in a third community acting as controls. Students in the intervention community with lower smoking rates at the end of the project (one school year) received rewards.

Only one study of the SFC competition, a non-randomized controlled trial, reported a significant effect of the competition on the prevention of smoking at the longest follow-up. However, this study had a risk of multiple biases, and when we calculated the adjusted RR we no longer detected a statistically significant difference. The pooled RR for the more robust RCTs (3 studies, n = 3056 participants) suggests that, from the available data, there is no statistically significant effect of incentives to prevent smoking initiation among children and adolescents in the long term (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.19). Pooled results from non-randomized trials also did not detect a significant effect, and we were unable to extract data on our outcome of interest for the one trial that did not study the SFC. There is little robust evidence to suggest that unintended consequences (such as youth making false claims about their smoking status and bullying of smoking students) are consistently associated with such interventions, although this has not been the focus of much research. There was insufficient information to assess the dose-response relationship or to report costs.

Authors' conclusions

To date, incentive programmes have not been shown to prevent smoking initiation among youth, although there are relatively few published studies and these are of variable quality. Trials included in this meta-analysis were all studies of the SFC competition, which distributed small to moderately sized prizes to whole classes, usually through a lottery system.

Future studies might investigate the efficacy of incentives given to individual participants to prevent smoking uptake. Future research should consider the efficacy of incentives on smoking initiation, as well as progression of smoking, evaluate these in varying populations from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, and describe the intervention components in detail.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Do incentives help keep young people from starting to smoke in the medium to long term?

Most smokers start smoking before they are 18 years old. Starting smoking earlier in life means a smoker will smoke for more years than someone who starts smoking later, which increases the associated health risks of smoking. Given the high amount of tobacco use among young people and the corresponding poor health outcomes this will result in in the future, strategies to prevent smoking in adolescence are a public health priority. One new approach to preventing young people from starting to smoke is the use of incentives, whereby young people or groups of young people are rewarded for being smoke free. The aim of this review was to assess the effect of incentives on preventing children and adolescents (aged 5 to 18 years) from starting to smoke.

This review included seven trials, six of which were trials of the so-called Smokefree Class Competition (SFC), which has been widely used throughout Europe. In this competition, classes with youth generally between the ages of 11 to 14 years commit to being smoke free for a six month period. They report regularly on their smoking status, and if 90% or more of the class is non-smoking at the end of the six months, the class goes into a competition to win prizes. We combined results from five trials of SFC and found that the competition did not have a significant impact on whether or not young people who were previously non-smokers started smoking. In the one trial that was not of the SFC, classes with the smallest percentage of students smoking at the school year's end were given rewards, but we did not have enough information available to evaluate whether this programme was effective in preventing young people from starting to smoke.

Currently, there is no high quality evidence that incentives prevent young people from starting to smoke in the long term. Specifically, incentives associated with the SFC competition have not been shown to prevent young people from starting to smoke in the medium to long term, although there are relatively few published studies and these are of variable quality. Though potential negative effects of the SFC competition have not been widely researched, the data that is available suggests that the SFC competition does not have significant negative effects.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Les mesures incitatives pour la prévention du tabagisme chez les enfants et les adolescents

Contexte

Le tabagisme de l'adulte a généralement ses racines dans l'adolescence. Une personne qui ne commence pas à fumer pendant cette période ne le fera probablement jamais. En outre, une fois que le tabagisme s'est établi, le sevrage est difficile ; la probabilité d'arrêter de fumer est inversement proportionnelle à l'âge où l'on a commencé. L'utilisation de mesures incitatives constitue une nouvelle approche pour réduire la prévalence du tabagisme chez les jeunes.

Objectifs

Déterminer si des mesures incitatives parviennent à retenir les enfants et les adolescents de commencer à fumer. Nous avons également tenté d'évaluer la relation dose-réponse des mesures incitatives, les coûts des programmes d'incitation, si les mesures incitatives sont plus ou moins efficaces en combinaison avec d'autres interventions visant à prévenir l'initiation au tabagisme et les éventuelles conséquences imprévues des mesures incitatives.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur le tabagisme, ainsi que dans les bases de données MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CSA et PsycINFO au moyen de termes relatifs aux mesures d'incitation en combinaison avec des termes se référant au tabagisme et à la cigarette, ainsi qu'aux enfants et adolescents. Les recherches les plus récentes dataient de mai 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous nous sommes intéressés aux essais contrôlés randomisés ayant assigné des enfants et des adolescents (âgés de 5 à 18 ans), pris individuellement, par groupes ou par communautés, à une intervention ou à un groupe de contrôle, lorsque l'intervention incluait une mesure incitative visant à prévenir l'adoption du tabagisme. Nous avons également pris en considération des essais contrôlés ayant effectué des mesures pré- et post-intervention.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les données ont été extraites par deux auteurs et évaluées de façon indépendante. Le principal critère de jugement était le statut tabagique, lors du suivi, des enfants ou des adolescents qui avaient déclaré au départ ne pas être fumeurs. Nous avons exigé un suivi d'au moins six mois depuis l'enrôlement et nous avons évalué le risque de biais de chaque étude. Nous avons utilisé la définition la plus rigoureuse de l'abstinence dans chaque essai mais n'avons pas exigé de validation biochimique du tabagisme autodéclaré pour inclure une étude. Lorsque cela était possible, nous avons combiné les études éligibles par la méthode à effet fixe de Mantel-Haenszel pour calculer des estimations communes au suivi le plus long, les études étant regroupées sur la base de leur design.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons identifié sept études contrôlées remplissant nos critères d'inclusion, qui incluaient des participants âgés de 11 à 14 ans. Sur les sept essais identifiés, seuls cinq avaient des données analysables intéressantes pour cette revue et ont participé à la méta-analyse (6362 participants au total qui étaient non-fumeurs au départ ; 3466 dans le groupe de l'intervention et 2896 dans le groupe de contrôle). Toutes ces études, sauf une, étaient des essais dans le cadre du concours SFC (Smokefree Class Competition) de classe sans tabac mis en œuvre partout en Europe. Dans ce concours, des classes de jeunes âgés en général de 11 à 14 ans s'engagent à ne pas fumer pendant une période de six mois. Ils rendent compte régulièrement de leur statut tabagique, et si 90 % ou plus des élèves de la classe sont non-fumeurs à la fin des six mois la classe participe à un concours pour gagner des prix. La seule étude qui n'était pas un essai SFC était un essai contrôlé dans lequel les écoles de deux communautés avaient été assignées à l'intervention, les écoles d'une troisième communauté servant de contrôle. Les élèves de la communauté d'intervention qui avaient le plus faible taux de tabagisme à la fin du projet (une année scolaire) avaient reçu des récompenses.

Une seule étude du concours SFC, un essai contrôlé non randomisé, avait rendu compte d'un effet significatif du concours sur la prévention du tabagisme au bout du plus long suivi. Cette étude avait toutefois de multiples risques de biais, et quand nous avons calculé le RR ajusté nous n'avons plus détecté de différence statistiquement significative. Le RR regroupé pour les ECR les plus robustes (3 études, n = 3056 participants) laisse apparaitre que, d'après les données disponibles, il n'y a pas d'effet statistiquement significatif à long terme des mesures incitatives pour la prévention de l'initiation au tabagisme chez les enfants et les adolescents (RR 1,00 ; IC à 95% 0,84 à 1,19). Les résultats regroupés d'essais non randomisés n'ont pas non plus mis en évidence d'effet significatif, et nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'extraire des données sur notre critère de résultat pour l'essai hors SFC. Il y a quelques petites preuves solides que des conséquences imprévues (comme des jeunes faisant de fausses déclarations au sujet de leur statut tabagique ou l'intimidation des élèves fumeurs) sont systématiquement associées à de telles interventions, bien que cela n'ait pas fait l'objet de beaucoup de recherches. Il n'y avait pas suffisamment d'informations pour évaluer la relation dose-réponse ou pour rendre compte des coûts.

Conclusions des auteurs

À ce jour, les programmes incitatifs ne se sont pas avérés prévenir l'initiation au tabagisme chez les jeunes, même s'il n'y a que relativement peu d'études publiées et que celles-ci sont de qualité variable. Les essais inclus dans cette méta-analyse étaient tous des études du concours SFC qui distribuaient des prix de petite à moyenne valeur à des classes entières, généralement par le biais d'un système de loterie.

Les études futures devraient étudier l'efficacité des incitations distribuées individuellement aux participants afin de les retenir de commencer à fumer. Les recherches futures devraient examiner l'efficacité des mesures incitatives sur l'initiation au tabagisme ainsi que sur la progression du tabagisme, évaluer ceci dans diverses populations d'origines socio-économiques et ethniques différentes, et décrire en détail les composantes de l'intervention.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Les mesures incitatives aident-elles à retenir les jeunes de commencer à fumer sur le moyen/long terme ?

La plupart des fumeurs commencent à fumer avant l'âge de 18 ans. Si un fumeur commence à fumer plus tôt dans sa vie, il fumera pendant plus d'années que quelqu'un qui commence à fumer plus tard, ce qui accroit les risques pour la santé associés au tabagisme. Compte tenu de la grande consommation de tabac chez les jeunes et des conséquences négatives que cela aura sur leur santé dans le futur, les stratégies de prévention du tabagisme à l'adolescence sont une priorité de santé publique. Une nouvelle approche pour retenir les jeunes de commencer à fumer est l'utilisation de mesures incitatives consistant à récompenser les jeunes ou les groupes de jeunes s'ils ne fument pas. Le but de cette revue était d'évaluer l'effet des mesures incitatives visant à retenir les enfants et les adolescents (âgés de 5 à 18 ans) de commencer à fumer.

Cette revue incluait sept essais, dont six étaient des essais dans le cadre du concours SFC (Smokefree Class Competition) de classe sans tabac qui a été beaucoup utilisé à travers l'Europe. Dans ce concours, des classes de jeunes âgés en général de 11 à 14 ans s'engagent à ne pas fumer pendant une période de six mois. Ils rendent compte régulièrement de leur statut tabagique, et si 90 % ou plus des élèves de la classe sont non-fumeurs à la fin des six mois, la classe participe à un concours pour gagner des prix. Nous avons combiné les résultats de cinq essais de SFC et constaté que le concours n'avait pas eu d'impact significatif sur le fait que les jeunes commencent ou non à fumer. Dans un essai non SFC, les classes ayant le plus petit pourcentage d'élèves fumeurs à la fin de l'année scolaire recevaient des récompenses, mais nous ne disposions pas de suffisamment d'informations pour évaluer si ce programme était efficace pour retenir les jeunes de commencer à fumer.

À l'heure actuelle, il n'existe aucune preuve de bonne qualité que, sur le long terme, les mesures incitatives retiennent les jeunes de commencer à fumer. Plus spécifiquement, les mesures incitatives liées au concours SFC ne se sont pas avérées, à moyen/long terme, retenir les jeunes de commencer à fumer, même s'il n'y a que relativement peu d'études publiées et que celles-ci sont de qualité variable. Bien que les effets négatifs potentiels du concours SFC n'aient pas été beaucoup étudiés, les données disponibles laissent penser que le concours SFC n'a pas d'effets négatifs importants.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 2nd November, 2012
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�

 

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Können Anreize Kinder und Jugendliche mittel- und langfristig vom Einstieg in das Rauchen abhalten?

Die meisten Raucher fangen vor dem 18. Lebensjahr mit dem Rauchen an. Je eher begonnen wird desto länger ist man dem Tabakrauch ausgesetzt, was die damit verbundenen Gesundheitsrisiken erhöht. Angesichts des hohen Tabakkonsums unter jungen Leuten und der dadurch in Zukunft zu erwartenden Gesundheitsschäden ist die Raucherprävention bei Kindern und Jugendlichen ein wichtiges Ziel der öffentlichen Gesundheit. Eine neue Heransgehensweise in der Raucherprävention ist es, Anreize zu schaffen, damit junge Leute nicht in das Rauchen einsteigen. Dabei werden Kinder und Jugendliche einzeln oder in Gruppen für rauchfreies Verhalten belohnt. Das Ziel dieser Übersichtsarbeit war es, zu untersuchen, ob solche Nichtraucher-Anreize Kinder und Jugendliche (5 bis 18 Jahre) vom Einstieg ins Rauchen abhalten.

Diese Arbeit schloss sieben Studien ein, davon sechs zum europaweiten Wettbewerb „Smokefree Class Competition“ (SFC). Bei diesem Wettbewerb verpflichtet sich eine ganze Schulklasse mit Schülern in der Regel zwischen 11 und 14 Jahren dazu, über einen sechsmonatigen Zeitraum nicht zu rauchen. Sie berichten regelmässig über ihren Raucherstatus. Wenn mindestens 90% der Klasse am Ende der sechs Monate rauchfrei sind, nimmt diese an einer Auslosung teil. Wir haben die Ergebnisse von fünf Studien zum SFC zusammengefasst und fanden keinen signifikanten Effekt des Wettbewerbes auf die Entscheidung jugendlicher Nichtraucher, mit dem Rauchen zu beginnen. In der einen Studie, welche nicht den SFC untersuchte, wurde der Schulklasse mit der geringsten Anzahl von Rauchern am Ende des Schuljahres ein Preis verliehen. Uns lagen jedoch nicht genug Studiendaten vor, um einzuschätzen, ob dieses Programm Jugendliche wirksam vom Einstieg ins Rauchen abhielt.

Derzeit gibt es keine hochwertige Evidenz, dass Anreize junge Leute langfristig vom Einstieg in das Rauchen abhalten. Insbesondere Anreize im Rahmen des SFC-Wettbewerbs konnten junge Leute mittel- bis langfristig nicht vom Rauchereinstieg abhalten. Dabei ist zu beachten, dass relativ wenige publizierte Studien vorlagen und diese von unterschiedlicher Qualität waren. Obwohl mögliche negative Effekte des SFC nicht breit untersucht wurden, legen die vorhandenen Daten nahe, dass der Wettbewerb keine wesentlichen negativen Auswirkungen hat.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

C. Mischke, Koordination durch Cochrane Schweiz