Intervention Review

Anaesthesia for evacuation of incomplete miscarriage

  1. Jose Andres Calvache1,*,
  2. Mario F Delgado-Noguera2,
  3. Emmanuel Lesaffre3,
  4. Robert J Stolker4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 18 APR 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008681.pub2

How to Cite

Calvache JA, Delgado-Noguera MF, Lesaffre E, Stolker RJ. Anaesthesia for evacuation of incomplete miscarriage. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD008681. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008681.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Erasmus University Rotterdam (NL), University of Cauca (COL), Netherlands Institute for Health Sciences (NL), Department of Anesthesiology (COL), Rotterdam, Netherlands

  2. 2

    University of Cauca, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Popayan, Colombia

  3. 3

    Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Biostatistics, Rotterdam, Netherlands

  4. 4

    Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Anesthesiology, Rotterdam, Netherlands

*Jose Andres Calvache, Netherlands Institute for Health Sciences (NL), Department of Anesthesiology (COL), Erasmus University Rotterdam (NL), University of Cauca (COL), Educational Support Center (DCO) Room Ee308, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam, 3000 CA, Netherlands. jacalvache@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 APR 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

An incomplete miscarriage occurs when all the products of conception are not expelled through the cervix. Curettage or vacuum aspiration have been used to remove retained tissues. The anaesthetic techniques used to facilitate this procedure have not been systematically evaluated in order to determine which provide better outcomes to the patients.

Objectives

To assess the effects of general anaesthesia, sedation or analgesia, regional or paracervical block anaesthetic techniques, or differing regimens of these, for surgical evacuation of incomplete miscarriage.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (23 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), PubMed (1966 to 23 January 2012), EMBASE (1974 to 23 January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to 23 January 2012), LILACS (1982 to 23 January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved studies.

Selection criteria

All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cluster-RCTs comparing the use of any anaesthetic technique (defined by authors as general anaesthesia, sedation/analgesia, regional or paracervical local block (PCB) procedures) to perform surgical evacuation of an incomplete miscarriage. We excluded quasi-randomised trials and studies that were only available as abstracts.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and assessed risk of bias. Data were independently extracted and checked for accuracy.

Main results

We included seven trials involving 800 women. The comparisons revealed a very high clinical heterogeneity. As a result of the heterogeneity in the randomisation unit, we did not combine trials but reported the individual trial results in the ‘Data and analysis’ section and in the text. Half of trials have unclear or high risk of bias in several domains.

We did not find any trial reporting data about maternal mortality. In terms of postoperative pain, PCB does not improve the control of postoperative pain when it is compared against sedation/analgesia or versus no anaesthesia/no analgesia. In the comparison of PCB with lidocaine versus PCB with saline solution, significant differences favouring the group with lidocaine were found in one trial (moderate or severe postoperative pain) (risk ratio (RR) 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18 to 0.59).

When opioids were used, postoperative nausea and vomiting was more frequent in two trials comparing those versus PCB. In terms of requirement of blood transfusion, two trials showed conflicting results.

Authors' conclusions

Particular considerations that influence the choice of anaesthesia for this procedure such as availability, effectiveness, safety, side effects, practitioner's choice, costs and woman's preferences of each technique should continue to be used until more evidence supporting the use of one technique or another.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Anaesthesia for surgical evacuation of an incomplete miscarriage

Miscarriage is when a pregnant woman loses her baby before the baby would be considered able to survive outside the womb. An incomplete miscarriage occurs when all the products of conception are not expelled through the cervix, which often happens when a woman miscarries before the 12th week of pregnancy. Medical treatment is available but traditionally, surgery has been used to remove any retained tissue. It could be done by curettage or with vacuum aspiration. It is a quick procedure but is associated with pain and discomfort and many anaesthetic techniques are used. These include general anaesthesia, sedation and analgesia, or regional nerve blocks such as paracervical block. We examined the existing randomised controlled studies to compare the effect of these anaesthetic techniques on patient satisfaction, postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting and any other side effects and maternal mortality.

We included seven trials involving 800 women. None of the included studies reported any maternal mortality. We did not combine the results of the trials because the trials were very different in the clinical interventions used and how the outcomes were assessed. One study reported higher maternal satisfaction with the use of general anaesthesia than sedation and analgesia. Paracervical block did not improve the control of postoperative pain when compared against sedation and analgesia. More nausea and vomiting were reported when opioid drugs were used.

Currently, the levels of postoperative pain experienced by women undergoing surgical evacuation of incomplete miscarriage are not completely relieved. Further studies in this context should be conducted to address this question. Key factors that influence the choice of anaesthesia include availability, effectiveness, safety, side effects, and costs. Other factors include patient preference, practitioner choice, facility resources and medical indications.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Anesthésie pour évacuation de fausse couche incomplète

Contexte

Une fausse couche incomplète se produit lorsqu'il n'a pas expulsion de tous les produits de la conception par le col de l'utérus. Le curetage ou l'aspiration sont utilisés pour enlever les tissus résiduels. Les techniques anesthésiques utilisées pour faciliter cette procédure n'ont pas été systématiquement évaluées pour déterminer quelle est la meilleure pour les patientes.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de l'anesthésie générale, de la sédation ou de l'analgésie, des techniques anesthésiques de blocage nerveux régional ou paracervical, ou de différents dosages de ceux-ci, pour l'évacuation chirurgicale de la fausse couche incomplète.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (23 janvier 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 1), PubMed (de 1966 jusqu'au 23 janvier 2012), EMBASE (de 1974 jusqu'au 23 janvier 2012), CINAHL (de 1982 jusqu'au 23 janvier 2012), LILACS (de 1982 jusqu'au 23 janvier 2012) et les références bibliographiques des études trouvées.

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et les ECR en grappes, publiés et non publiés, comparant l'utilisation d'une quelconque technique d'anesthésie (définie par les auteurs comme anesthésie générale, sédation / analgésie, procédures de blocage régional ou paracervical (BPC)) pour effectuer l'évacuation chirurgicale d'une fausse couche incomplète. Nous avons exclu les essais quasi-randomisés et les études qui n'étaient disponibles que sous forme de résumés.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué les études à inclure et les risques de biais indépendamment. Les données ont été extraites et leur exactitude a été vérifiée de manière indépendante.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus sept essais impliquant un total de 800 femmes. Les comparaisons ont révélé une très grande hétérogénéité clinique. En raison de l'hétérogénéité au niveau de l'unité de randomisation, nous n'avons pas regroupé les essais mais nous avons rapporté les résultats des différents essais dans la section « Data and analysis » (données et analyse) et dans le texte. La moitié des essais ont un risque incertain ou élevé de biais dans plusieurs domaines.

Nous n'avons pas trouvé d'essai ayant rapporté des données sur la mortalité maternelle. En termes de douleur postopératoire, le BPC n'améliore pas le contrôle de la douleur postopératoire quand il est comparé à une sédation / analgésie ou à l'absence d'anesthésie / d'analgésie. Dans la comparaison du BPC avec lidocaïne au BPC avec solution saline, des différences significatives en faveur du groupe à lidocaïne ont été constatées dans un essai (douleur postopératoire modérée ou sévère) (risque relatif (RR) 0,32 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,18 à 0,59).

Dans les deux essais comparant des opiacés au BPC, les opiacés étaient associés à plus de nausées et de vomissements postopératoires. En ce qui concerne les besoins en transfusion sanguine, deux essais avaient abouti à des résultats contradictoires.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les considérations particulières qui influencent le choix de l'anesthésie pour cette procédure (comme la disponibilité, l'efficacité, l'innocuité, les effets secondaires, le choix du praticien, les coûts et les préférences de la femme) doivent rester en vigueur tant qu'on ne dispose pas de nouvelles preuves justifiant l'utilisation d'une technique ou d'une autre.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Anesthésie pour évacuation de fausse couche incomplète

Anesthésie pour évacuation chirurgicale en cas de fausse couche incomplète

On parle de fausse couche quand une femme enceinte perd son bébé avant que celui-ci ne soit considéré comme capable de survivre hors de l'utérus. Une fausse couche incomplète se produit lorsqu'il n'y a pas eu expulsion de tous les produits de la conception par le col de l'utérus, ce qui arrive souvent quand une femme fait une fausse couche avant la 12ème semaine de grossesse. Un traitement médical est disponible mais, traditionnellement, la chirurgie est utilisée pour enlever tout tissu résiduel. Cela peut être fait par curetage ou par aspiration. Il s'agit d'une procédure rapide mais qui est associée à de la douleur et de l'inconfort, et de nombreuses techniques anesthésiques sont utilisées. Celles-ci incluent notamment l'anesthésie générale, la sédation et l'analgésie, ou des blocages nerveux régionaux tel que le bloc paracervical. Nous avons examiné les études contrôlées randomisées existantes pour comparer l'effet de ces techniques anesthésiques sur la satisfaction de la patiente, la douleur postopératoire, les nausées, vomissements et autres effets secondaires, ainsi que sur la mortalité maternelle.

Nous avons inclus sept essais impliquant un total de 800 femmes. Aucune des études incluses n'avait fait état d'une quelconque mortalité maternelle. Nous n'avons pas regroupé les résultats des essais parce que ceux-ci différaient beaucoup quant aux interventions cliniques utilisées et à la façon dont les résultats avaient été évalués. Une étude avait rendu compte d'une plus grande satisfaction maternelle avec l'anesthésie générale qu'avec la sédation et l'analgésie. Le bloc paracervical n'avait pas amélioré le contrôle de la douleur postopératoire en comparaison avec la sédation et l'analgésie. De plus nombreux cas de nausées et de vomissements avaient été signalés lorsque des opiacés étaient utilisés.

Actuellement, la douleur postopératoire ressentie par les femmes subissant une évacuation chirurgicale de fausse couche incomplète n'est pas totalement soulagée. D'autres études dans ce contexte devraient être menées pour examiner cette question. Les facteurs clés qui influencent le choix de l'anesthésie sont notamment la disponibilité, l'efficacité, l'innocuité, les effets secondaires et les coûts. Les autres facteurs incluent la préférence du patient, le choix du praticien, les ressources de l'établissement et les indications médicales.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st June, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français