Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

  1. Kiyomi Shinohara1,
  2. Mina Honyashiki1,
  3. Hissei Imai2,
  4. Vivien Hunot3,
  5. Deborah M Caldwell4,
  6. Philippa Davies4,
  7. Theresa HM Moore4,
  8. Toshi A Furukawa5,
  9. Rachel Churchill3,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group

Published Online: 16 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008696.pub2


How to Cite

Shinohara K, Honyashiki M, Imai H, Hunot V, Caldwell DM, Davies P, Moore THM, Furukawa TA, Churchill R. Behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD008696. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008696.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine / School of Public Health, Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto, Japan

  2. 2

    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine / School of Public Health, Department of Field Medicine, Kyoto, Japan

  3. 3

    University of Bristol, Centre for Academic Mental Health, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol, Avon, UK

  4. 4

    University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol, Avon, UK

  5. 5

    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine / School of Public Health, Departments of Health Promotion and Behavior Change and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto, Japan

*Rachel Churchill, Centre for Academic Mental Health, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, Avon, BS8 2BN, UK. rachel.churchill@ccdan.org. rachel.churchill@bristol.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 16 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Behavioural therapies represent one of several categories of psychological therapies that are currently used in the treatment of depression. However, the effectiveness and acceptability of behavioural therapies for depression compared with other psychological therapies remain unclear.

Objectives

1. To examine the effects of all BT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.

2. To examine the effects of different BT approaches (behavioural therapy, behavioural activation, social skills training and relaxation training) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.

3. To examine the effects of all BT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (CBT, third wave CBT, psychodynamic, humanistic and integrative psychological therapies) for acute depression.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group Trials Specialised Register (CCDANCTR, 31/07/2013), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from The Cochrane Library (all years), EMBASE, (1974-), MEDLINE (1950-) and PsycINFO (1967-). We also searched CINAHL (May 2010) and PSYNDEX (June 2010) and reference lists of the included studies and relevant reviews for additional published and unpublished studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials that compared behavioural therapies with other psychological therapies for acute depression in adults.

Data collection and analysis

Two or more review authors independently identified studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information.

Main results

Twenty-five trials involving 955 participants compared behavioural therapies with one or more of five other major categories of psychological therapies (cognitive-behavioural, third wave cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic, humanistic and integrative therapies). Most studies had a small sample size and were assessed as being at unclear or high risk of bias. Compared with all other psychological therapies together, behavioural therapies showed no significant difference in response rate (18 studies, 690 participants, risk ratio (RR) 0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86 to 1.09) or in acceptability (15 studies, 495 participants, RR of total dropout rate 1.02, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.61). Similarly, in comparison with each of the other classes of psychological therapies, low-quality evidence showed better response to cognitive-behavioural therapies than to behavioural therapies (15 studies, 544 participants, RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.05) and low-quality evidence of better response to behavioural therapies over psychodynamic therapies (2 studies, 110 participants, RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.82).

When compared with integrative therapies and humanistic therapies, only one study was included in each comparison, and the analysis showed no significant difference between behavioural therapies and integrative or humanistic therapies.

Authors' conclusions

We found low- to moderate-quality evidence that behavioural therapies and other psychological therapies are equally effective. The current evidence base that evaluates the relative benefits and harms of behavioural therapies is very weak. This limits our confidence in both the size of the effect and its precision for our key outcomes related to response and withdrawal. Studies recruiting larger samples with improved reporting of design and fidelity to treatment would improve the quality of evidence in this review.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

Major depression is one of the common mental illnesses characterised by persistent low mood and loss of interest in pleasurable activities, accompanied by a range of symptoms, including weight loss, insomnia, fatigue, loss of energy, inappropriate guilt, poor concentration and morbid thoughts of death. Whilst antidepressants remain the mainstay of treatment for depression in healthcare settings, psychological therapies are still important alternative or additional interventions for depressive disorders. Nowadays, a diverse range of psychological therapies are available (such as cognitive-behavioural therapies, behavioural therapies, psychodynamic therapies, humanistic therapies and integrative therapies). It is very important to know whether one type of psychological therapy is more effective than another, and to know which psychological therapy is the most effective treatment for depression. In this review, we focused on one of these—behavioural therapies (BT)—because they are relatively simple to deliver, and interest in them has recently been renewed. Behavioural therapies are usually based purely on operant and respondent principles, aimed to change the patient's depressive mood by changing his or her behaviour patterns. Whilst a number of BT models have been developed, we categorised the following approaches as behavioural therapies in this review: behavioural therapy (based on Lewinsohn's model, which focused on increasing pleasant activities), behavioural activation (originated from behavioural component of cognitive-behavioural therapy and based on Jacobson's work in 1996), social skills training/assertiveness training and relaxation therapy.

In this review, we assessed the efficacy and acceptability of behavioural therapies compared with all other psychological therapies in the treatment of acute phase depression (neither long-term nor treatment-resistant depression) in adults. Twenty-five randomised controlled trails were included in this review. The quality of evidence in our review is low because of issues with the design of the studies that we found and lack of precision in our results. Although we found that behavioural therapies and all other psychological therapies are equally effective and acceptable, more research is needed to confirm this finding.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les thérapies comportementales par rapport à d'autres thérapies psychologiques pour la dépression

Contexte

Les thérapies comportementales sont une de plusieurs catégories de thérapies psychologiques qui sont actuellement utilisés dans le traitement de la dépression. Cependant, l'efficacité et la pertinence des thérapies comportementales pour le traitement de la dépression par rapport à d'autres psychothérapies restent indéterminés.

Objectifs

1. Examiner les effets de toutes les approches de TC par rapport à toutes les autres approches psychothérapeutiques pour le traitement de la dépression.

2. Examiner les effets de différentes approches TC combinées (thérapie cognitive-comportementale, activation comportementale, l'entraînement aux habiletés sociales et une formation à la relaxation) par rapport à toutes les autres approches psychothérapeutiques pour le traitement de la dépression.

3. Examiner les effets de toutes les approches de TC par rapport à différentes psychothérapies (TCC, troisième onde de la TCC, des thérapies psychologiques psycho dynamiques, humanistes intégratives) pour le traitement de la dépression.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais du groupe Cochrane sur la dépression, l'anxiété et la névrose (CCDANCTR, 31/07/2013), qui inclut des essais contrôlés randomisés pertinents issus de La Bibliothèque Cochrane (Toutes les années), EMBASE (1974-), MEDLINE (1950-) et PsycINFO (1967-). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans CINAHL (mai 2010) et PSYNDEX (juin 2010) et les références bibliographiques des études incluses et des revues pertinentes pour identifier d'autres études publiées et non publiées.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés qui comparaient les thérapies comportementales à d'autres psychothérapies pour le traitement de la dépression chez l'adulte.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux ou plusieurs auteurs de la revue ont identifié les études, évalué la qualité des essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des études pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires.

Résultats Principaux

Vingt-cinq essais portant sur 955 participants comparaient les thérapies comportementales avec une ou plusieurs des cinq autres principales catégories de thérapies psychologiques (cognitive-comportementale, troisième onde cognitive-comportementale, psycho dynamique, humaniste et thérapies intégratives). La plupart des études présentaient un échantillon de petite taille et ont été évalués comme étant à risque incertain ou élevé de biais. Par rapport aux autres thérapies psychologiques ensemble, les thérapies comportementales n’ont montré aucune différence significative dans les taux de réponse (18 études, 690 participants, risque relatif (RR) à 95%, de 0.97, intervalle de confiance (IC) 95%, de 0,86 à 1,09) ou d'acceptabilité (15 études, 495 participants, RR total du taux d'abandon de 1,02, IC à 95%, de 0,65 à 1,61). De même, en comparaison avec chacune des autres classes de traitements psychologiques, des preuves de mauvaise qualité ont montré une meilleure réponse aux traitements cognitifs-comportementaux que pour les thérapies comportementales (15 études, 544 participants, RR de 0,93, IC à 95%, de 0,83 à 1,05) et des preuves de mauvaise qualité d'une meilleure réponse aux thérapies cognitive-comportementales sur les thérapies psycho dynamiques (2 études, 110 participants, RR de 1,24, IC à 95%, de 0,84 à 1,82).

Comparé avec des thérapies intégratives et humanistes, une seule étude a été incluse et l'analyse n’a montré aucune différence significative entre les thérapies cognitives-comportementales et les thérapies intégratives ou humanistes.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous avons trouvé des preuves d’évidence de qualité faible à modérée sur les thérapies comportementales et d'autres thérapies psychologiques comme étant pareillement efficaces. La base d’évidences actuelles qui évaluent les bénéfices relatifs et les inconvénients des thérapies comportementales sont très faibles. Cela limite notre confiance sur l’effet de taille et de précision pour nos principaux critères de jugement liés à des réponses et des arrêts prématurés. Des études portant sur des effectifs plus importants avec une amélioration du rapport de structure et observance du traitement pourraient améliorer la qualité des preuves dans cette revue.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les thérapies comportementales par rapport à d'autres thérapies psychologiques pour la dépression

Les thérapies comportementales par rapport à d'autres thérapies psychologiques pour la dépression

La dépression majeure est l'un des troubles mentaux courants qui se caractérise par une humeur morose persistante et la perte d'intérêt pour les activités agréables, accompagnée d'un éventail de symptômes, notamment la perte de poids, l'insomnie, la fatigue, la perte d'énergie, la culpabilité inappropriée, le manque de concentration et des pensées morbides de mort. Pendant que les antidépresseurs demeurent la pierre angulaire du traitement de la dépression dans les établissements de soins de santé, des thérapies psychologiques sont encore des importantes alternatives à d'autres interventions pour les troubles dépressifs. Aujourd’hui, diverses thérapies psychologiques sont disponibles (tels que les thérapies cognitivo-comportementales, les thérapies comportementales, les traitements psychodynamiques, les thérapies intégratives et humanistes). Il est très important de savoir si un type de psychothérapie est plus efficace qu' un autre, et de savoir quel type de psychothérapie est le traitement le plus efficace pour la dépression. Dans cette revue, nous nous sommes concentrés sur l'un des thérapies comportementales (TC) - car ils sont relativement simples à administrer, et l'intérêt pour elles a récemment été renouvelé. Les thérapies comportementales sont fondées généralement sur des principes de conditionnement opérant et de réponse, visant à modifier l'humeur dépressive des patients en modifiant le profil de comportement. Un certain nombre de modèles de TC ont été développés, nous avons classé les approches suivantes de thérapies comportementales dans cette revue: La thérapie comportementale (en se basant sur le modèle de Lewinsohn, qui portait sur l'augmentation des activités agréables), l’activation comportementale (sur la base comportementale de la thérapie cognitive-comportementale du travail de Jacobson en 1996), la formation à des compétences sociales d’entrainement/rassurance et la thérapie de relaxation.

Dans cette revue, nous avons évalué l'efficacité et l'acceptabilité des thérapies comportementales, par rapport à toutes les autres thérapies psychologiques dans le traitement de la phase aiguë de la dépression (pas à long terme ni de dépressions résistantes au traitement) chez l'adulte. Vingt-cinq des essais contrôlés randomisés ont été inclus dans cette revue. La qualité des preuves dans notre revue est faible en raison de problèmes liés à la conception des études que nous avons trouvés et du manque de précision dans nos résultats. Bien que nous ayons constaté que les thérapies comportementales et toutes les autres thérapies psychologiques sont pareillement efficaces et acceptables, des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour confirmer ces résultats.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 31st December, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�