Intervention Review

'Third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

  1. Vivien Hunot1,
  2. Theresa HM Moore2,
  3. Deborah M Caldwell2,
  4. Toshi A Furukawa3,
  5. Philippa Davies2,
  6. Hannah Jones4,
  7. Mina Honyashiki5,
  8. Peiyao Chen5,
  9. Glyn Lewis6,
  10. Rachel Churchill1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group

Published Online: 18 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008704.pub2

How to Cite

Hunot V, Moore THM, Caldwell DM, Furukawa TA, Davies P, Jones H, Honyashiki M, Chen P, Lewis G, Churchill R. 'Third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD008704. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008704.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Bristol, Centre for Academic Mental Health, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol, Avon, UK

  2. 2

    University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol, UK

  3. 3

    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine / School of Public Health, Departments of Health Promotion and Behavior Change and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto, Japan

  4. 4

    Institute of Mental Health, The University of Nottingham, Division of Psychiatry, Nottingham, UK

  5. 5

    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine / School of Public Health, Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto, Japan

  6. 6

    UCL, Mental Health Sciences Unit, London, UK

*Rachel Churchill, Centre for Academic Mental Health, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, Avon, BS8 2BN, UK. rachel.churchill@ccdan.org. rachel.churchill@bristol.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

So-called 'third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies represents a new generation of psychological therapies that are increasingly being used in the treatment of psychological problems. However, the effectiveness and acceptability of third wave cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) approaches as a treatment for depression compared with other psychological therapies remain unclear.

Objectives

1. To examine the effects of all third wave CBT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.

2. To examine the effects of different third wave CBT approaches (ACT, compassionate mind training, functional analytic psychotherapy, extended behavioural activation and metacognitive therapy) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.

3. To examine the effects of all third wave CBT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group Specialised Register (CCDANCTR to 01/01/12), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from The Cochrane Library (all years), EMBASE (1974-), MEDLINE (1950-) and PsycINFO (1967-). We also searched CINAHL (May 2010) and PSYNDEX (June 2010) and reference lists of the included studies and relevant reviews for additional published and unpublished studies. An updated search of CCDANCTR restricted to search terms relevant to third wave CBT was conducted in March 2013 (CCDANCTR to 01/02/13).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials that compared various third wave CBT with other psychological therapies for acute depression in adults.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently identified studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information where required. We rated the quality of evidence using GRADE methods.

Main results

A total of three studies involving 144 eligible participants were included in the review. Two of the studies (56 participants) compared an early version of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with CBT, and one study (88 eligible participants) compared extended behavioural activation with CBT. No other studies of third wave CBT were identified. The two ACT studies were assessed as being at high risk of performance bias and researcher allegiance. Post-treatment results, which were based on dropout rates, showed no evidence of any difference between third wave CBT and other psychological therapies for the primary outcomes of efficacy (risk ratio (RR) of clinical response 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 1.64; very low quality) and acceptability. Results at two-month follow-up showed no evidence of any difference between third wave CBT and other psychological therapies for clinical response (2 studies, 56 participants, RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.04 to 1.15). Moderate statistical heterogeneity was indicated in the acceptability analyses (I2 = 41%).

Authors' conclusions

Very low quality evidence suggests that third wave CBT and CBT approaches are equally effective and acceptable in the treatment of acute depression. Evidence is limited in quantity, quality and breadth of available studies, precluding us from drawing any conclusions as to their short- or longer-term equivalence. The increasing popularity of third wave CBT approaches in clinical practice underscores the importance of completing further studies to compare various third wave CBT approaches with other psychological therapy approaches to inform clinicians and policymakers on the most effective forms of psychological therapy in treating depression.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

'Third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

Major depression is a very common condition, in which people experience persistently low mood and loss of interest in pleasurable activities, accompanied by a range of symptoms including weight loss, insomnia, fatigue, loss of energy, inappropriate guilt, poor concentration and morbid thoughts of death. Psychological therapies are an important and popular alternative to antidepressants in the treatment of depression. Many different psychological therapy approaches have been developed over the past century, including behavioural, cognitive-behavioural (CBT), 'third wave' CBT, psychodynamic, humanistic and integrative therapies.

In this review, we focused on third wave CBT approaches, a group of psychological therapies that target the process of thoughts (rather than their content, as in CBT) to help people become aware of their thoughts and accept them in a non-judgemental way. The aim of the review was to find out whether third wave CBT was more effective and acceptable than other psychological therapy approaches for people with acute depression. The review included three studies, involving a total of 144 people. The studies examined two different forms of third wave CBT, consisting of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) (two studies) and extended behavioural activation (BA) (one study). All three studies compared these third wave CBT approaches with CBT. The results suggested that third wave CBT and CBT approaches were equally effective in treating depression. However, the quality of evidence was very low because of the small number of studies of poor quality that we included in the review; therefore it is not possible to conclude whether third wave CBT approaches might be more effective and acceptable than other psychological therapies in the short term or over a longer period of time. Given the increasing popularity of third wave CBT approaches in clinical practice, further studies should be prioritised to establish whether third wave CBT approaches are more helpful than other psychological therapies in treating people with acute depression.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparaison des thérapies cognitives et comportementales de « troisième vague » à d’autres thérapies psychologiques pour le traitement de la dépression

Contexte

Les thérapies cognitives et comportementales dites « de la troisième vague » représentent une nouvelle génération de psychothérapies, de plus en plus utilisée dans le traitement de problèmes psychologiques. Leur efficacité et leur acceptabilité dans le traitement de la dépression par rapport à d’autres psychothérapies sont cependant encore mal déterminées.

Objectifs

1. Examiner les effets de toutes les TCC de la troisième vague par rapport à toutes les autres approches psychothérapeutiques pour le traitement de la dépression.

2. Examiner les effets de différentes approches de la TCC de troisième vague (ACT, psychothérapie focalisée sur la compassion, psychothérapie analytique fonctionnelle, modèle étendu de l’activation comportementale et thérapie métacognitive) par rapport à toutes les autres approches psychothérapeutiques dans le traitement de la dépression.

3. Examiner les effets de toutes les TCC de troisième vague par rapport à différentes approches psychothérapeutiques (psychodynamique, comportementale, humaniste, intégrative, comportementale et cognitive) dans le traitement de la dépression.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre du groupe Cochrane sur la dépression, l’anxiété et la névrose (CCDANCTR, au 01/01/12), qui inclut les essais contrôlés randomisés pertinents issus de la Bibliothèque Cochrane (toutes les années), d’EMBASE (1974-), de MEDLINE (1950-) et de PsycINFO (1967-). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans CINAHL (mai 2010) et PSYNDEX (juin 2010) et dans les références bibliographiques des études incluses et des revues pertinentes pour identifier d’autres études publiées et non publiées. Une recherche actualisée dans CCDANCTR, restreinte aux termes de recherche pertinents pour la TCC de troisième vague, a été effectuée en mars 2013 (CCDANCTR au 01/02/13).

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés comparent différentes TCC de troisième vague à d’autres psychothérapies pour le traitement de la dépression aiguë chez l’adulte.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont identifié les études, évalué la qualité des essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Les auteurs des études ont été contactés pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires lorsque cela était nécessaire. Nous avons évalué la qualité des données au moyen de l’échelle GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

Un total de trois études impliquant en tout 144 participants éligibles a été inclus dans la revue. Deux des études (56 participants) comparaient l’une des premières versions précoce de la thérapie d’acceptation et d’engagement (ACT) avec une TCC classique, et une étude (88 participants éligibles) comparant le modèle étendu d’activation comportementale avec la TCC. Aucune autre étude portant sur les TCC de troisième vague n’a été identifiée. Les deux études sur l’ACT ont été jugées à haut risque de biais d’exécution et d’allégeance des chercheurs. Les résultats après traitement, qui étaient basés sur les taux d’abandon, n’ont mis en évidence aucune différence entre les TCC de troisième vague et d’autres thérapies psychologiques pour les principaux critères de jugement d’efficacité (risque relatif (RR) de réponse clinique 1,14, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 0,79 à 1,64 ; très faible qualité) et d’acceptabilité. Les résultats d’un suivi sur deux mois ne donnent aucune preuve de différence entre les TCC de troisième génération et d’autres thérapies psychologiques pour la réponse clinique (2 études, 56 participants, RR de 0,22, IC à 95 % de 0,04 à 1,15). Une hétérogénéité statistique modérée a été mise en lumière dans les analyses d’acceptabilité (I2 =41 %).

Conclusions des auteurs

Des preuves de très faible qualité suggèrent que les TCC de troisième vague et les TCC classiques sont aussi efficaces et acceptables les unes que les autres dans le traitement de la dépression aiguë. Les preuves sont limitées en termes de quantité, de qualité et d’étendue des études disponibles, ce qui nous empêche de tirer des conclusions sur leur équivalence à court ou long terme. La popularité croissante des TCC de troisième vague dans la pratique clinique souligne l’importance qu’il y a à réaliser des études supplémentaires afin de comparer leurs différentes approches à d’autres approches psychothérapeutiques pour guider les cliniciens et les décideurs vers les méthodes les plus efficaces de thérapie psychologique pour le traitement de la dépression.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparaison des thérapies cognitives et comportementales de « troisième vague » à d’autres thérapies psychologiques pour le traitement de la dépression

Comparaison des thérapies cognitives et comportementales de « troisième vagues » à d’autres thérapies psychologiques pour le traitement de la dépression

La dépression majeure est une pathologie très courante, qui se manifeste par une morosité persistante et une perte d’intérêt pour les activités agréables, accompagnée de divers symptômes tels que la perte de poids, l’insomnie, la fatigue, la perte d’énergie, un sentiment injustifié de culpabilité, un manque de concentration et des pensées morbides. Les thérapies psychologiques constituent une alternative importante et très répandue aux antidépresseurs pour le traitement de la dépression. De nombreuses approches psychothérapeutiques différentes ont été développés au cours du siècle passé, notamment les psychothérapies comportementales, cognitivo-comportementales (TCC), les TCC de la « troisième vague », les psychothérapies humanistes et les psychothérapies intégratives.

Dans cette revue, nous nous sommes concentrés sur les TCC dites de troisième vague, un groupe des psychothérapies qui s’intéressent aux processus de pensée (plutôt qu’à leur contenu comme les TCC classiques) pour aider les sujets à prendre conscience de leurs pensées et à les accepter sans porter de jugement. L’objectif de cette revue était de déterminer si les TCC de la troisième vague étaient plus efficaces et plus acceptables que d’autres approches psychothérapeutiques pour les personnes souffrant de dépression aiguë. La présente revue a inclus trois études, impliquant un total de 144 personnes. Ces études examinaient deux formes différentes de TCC de troisième vague : thérapie d’acceptation et d’engagement (ACT) (deux études) et activation comportementale étendue (une étude). Les trois études comparaient ces TCC de troisième vague avec la TCC classique. Les résultats suggéraient que la TCC de la troisième vague et la TCC classique étaient aussi efficaces l’une que l’autre dans le traitement de la dépression. Cependant, la qualité des preuves était très faible en raison du petit nombre d’études que nous avons incluses dans la revue et de la mauvaise qualité de celles-ci. Par conséquent, il n’est pas possible de conclure si les TCC de la troisième vague pourraient être plus efficaces et plus acceptables que d’autres psychothérapies à court terme ou à plus long terme. Compte tenu la popularité croissante des TCC de la troisième vague dans la pratique clinique, la priorité devrait être donnée à la réalisation de nouvelles études visant à établir si cette approche est plus utile que d’autres psychothérapies dans le traitement des patients atteints de dépression aiguë.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 9th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�