Interventions for preventing falls in people after stroke

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors


Abstract

Background

Falls are one of the most common medical complications after stroke with a reported incidence of 7% in the first week after stroke onset. Studies investigating falls in the later phase after stroke report an incidence of up to 73% in the first year post-stroke.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions aimed at preventing falls in people after stroke.

Search methods

We searched the trials registers of the Cochrane Stroke Group (November 2012) and the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group (May 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1950 to May 2012), EMBASE (1980 to May 2012), CINAHL (1982 to May 2012), PsycINFO (1806 to May 2012), AMED (1985 to May 2012) and PEDro (May 2012). We also searched trials registers, checked reference lists and contacted authors.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials of interventions where the primary or secondary aim was to prevent falls in people after stroke.

Data collection and analysis

Review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We used a rate ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) to compare the rate of falls (e.g. falls per person year) between intervention and control groups. For risk of falling we used a risk ratio and 95% CI based on the number of people falling (fallers) in each group. We pooled results where appropriate.

Main results

We included 10 studies with a total of 1004 participants. One study evaluated the effect of exercises in the acute and subacute phase after stroke but found no significant difference in rate of falls (rate ratio 0.92, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.90, 95 participants). The pooled result of four studies investigating the effect of exercises on preventing falls in the chronic phase also found no significant difference for rate of falls (rate ratio 0.75, 95% CI 0.41 to 1.38, 412 participants).

For number of fallers, one study examined the effect of exercises in the acute and subacute phase after stroke but found no significant difference between the intervention and control group (risk ratio 1.19, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.71, 95 participants). The pooled result of six studies examining the effect of exercises in the chronic phase also found no significant difference in number of fallers between the intervention and control groups (risk ratio 1.02, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.24, 616 participants).

The rate of falls and the number of fallers was significantly reduced in two studies evaluating the effect of medication on preventing falls; one study (85 participants) compared vitamin D versus placebo in institutionalised women after stroke with low vitamin D levels, and the other study (79 participants) evaluated alendronate versus alphacalcidol in hospitalised people after stroke.

One study provided single lens distance glasses to regular wearers of multifocal glasses. In a subgroup of 46 participants post-stroke there was no significant difference in the rate of falls (rate ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.52 to 2.25) or the number of fallers between both groups (risk ratio 0.74, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.18).

Authors' conclusions

There is currently insufficient evidence that exercises or prescription of single lens glasses to multifocal users prevent falls or decrease the number of people falling after being discharged from rehabilitation following their stroke. Two studies testing vitamin D versus placebo and alendronate versus alphacalcidol found a significant reduction in falls and the number of people falling. However, these findings should be replicated before the results are implemented in clinical practice.

Résumé scientifique

Interventions pour la prévention des chutes chez les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC

Contexte

Les chutes sont l'une des plus fréquentes complications médicales après un AVC, avec une incidence déclarée de 7 % dans la première semaine qui suit le début de l'AVC. Les études portant sur les chutes dans la phase ultérieure qui suit un AVC indiquent une incidence pouvant atteindre 73 % dans la première année qui suit l'AVC.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des interventions visant à prévenir les chutes chez les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les registres d'essais du groupe Cochrane sur les accidents vasculaires cérébraux (novembre 2012) et du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires (mai 2012), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés - Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) dans The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 5, MEDLINE (de 1950 à mai 2012), EMBASE (de 1980 à mai 2012), CINAHL (de 1982 à mai 2012), PsycINFO (de 1806 à mai 2012), AMED (de 1985 à mai 2012) et PEDro (mai 2012). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans des registres d'essais, consulté les listes bibliographiques et contacté les auteurs.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés d'interventions où l'objectif primaire ou secondaire était de prévenir les chutes chez les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les auteurs de la revue ont sélectionné les études à inclure, évalué la qualité des essais et extrait les données de façon indépendante. Nous avons utilisé le rapport des taux et l'intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % pour comparer les taux de chutes (par ex. le nombre de chutes par personne et par an) entre les groupes d'intervention et les groupes témoins. Pour le risque de chute, nous avons utilisé le risque relatif et l'IC à 95 % sur la base du nombre de personnes tombées dans chaque groupe. Nous avons regroupé les résultats lorsque cela était approprié.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus 10 études totalisant 1 004 participants. Une étude a évalué l'effet de l'exercice sur la phase aiguë et subaiguë après un AVC mais n'a trouvé aucune différence significative en termes de taux de chutes (rapport des taux 0,92, IC à 95 % 0,45 à 1,90, 95 participants). De même, les résultats combinés de quatre études portant sur l'effet de l'exercice sur la prévention des chutes dans la phase chronique n'ont révélé aucune différence significative en termes de taux de chutes (rapport des taux 0,75, IC à 95 % 0,41 à 1,38, 412 participants).

Pour le nombre de personnes tombées, une étude a examiné l'effet de l'exercice sur la phase aiguë et subaiguë après un AVC mais n'a trouvé aucune différence significative entre le groupe d'intervention et le groupe témoin (risque relatif 1,19, IC à 95 % 0,83 à 1,71, 95 participants). De même, les résultats combinés de six études examinant l'effet de l'exercice dans la phase chronique n'ont révélé aucune différence significative en termes de nombre de personnes tombées entre les groupes d'intervention et témoins (risque relatif 1,02, IC à 95 % 0,83 à 1,24, 616 participants).

Le taux de chutes et le nombre de personnes tombées était significativement réduit dans deux études évaluant l'effet de la prise de médicaments sur la prévention des chutes ; une étude (85 participants) comparait la vitamine D à un placebo chez des femmes en établissement suite à un AVC et présentant de faibles niveaux de vitamine D, et l'autre étude (79 participants) comparait l'alendronate à l'alphacalcidol chez des personnes hospitalisées suite à un AVC.

Une étude fournissait des lunettes à verres unifocaux pour une vision à distance à des personnes portant habituellement des verres multifocaux. Dans un sous-groupe de 46 participants post-AVC, il n'y avait pas de différence significative du taux de chutes (rapport des taux 1,08, IC à 95 % 0,52 à 2,25) ou du nombre de personnes tombées entre les deux groupes (risque relatif 0,74, IC à 95 % 0,47 à 1,18).

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'y a pas à ce jour suffisamment de preuves que l'exercice ou la prescription de lunettes à verres unifocaux à des personnes portant habituellement des verres multifocaux préviennent les chutes ou diminuent le nombre de personnes faisant des chutes après avoir quitté un établissement de rééducation suite à leur AVC. Deux études comparant la vitamine D à un placebo et l'alendronate à l'alphacalcidol ont révélé une réduction significative des chutes et du nombre de personnes faisant des chutes. Cependant, ces données doivent être reproduites avant que les résultats soient appliqués à la pratique clinique.

Plain language summary

Interventions for preventing falls in people after stroke

Falls are commonly seen in people who have had a stroke and occur in 7% of people in the first week after their stroke. In the later phase after stroke, 55% to 73% of people experience a fall one year after their stroke. Not all falls are serious enough to require medical attention but even non-serious falls may lead to people developing a fear of falling. They are a factor for predicting future falls, which may restrict the person's activities of daily living and therefore require attention. This review investigated which methods are effective for preventing falls in people after their stroke. After searching the literature, we included 10 studies with a total of 1004 participants. We found studies that investigated exercises, medication, and the provision of single lens distance vision glasses instead of multifocal glasses for preventing falls. Exercises did not appear to reduce the rate of falls or the number of people falling. The majority of studies asked participants to do exercises only. One study offered exercises together with additional components such as educational sessions about falls. Another study offered exercises together with a comprehensive risk assessment and subsequent referrals, such as a review by an optometrist or new shoes, leading to a personalised programme for preventing falls. Neither of these two studies reduced the rate of falls or the number of people falling. One study, which gave vitamin D to women after their stroke who had low vitamin D levels and were admitted to long-term care, showed a reduction in the rate of falls and the number of people falling. In another study, alendronate led to a reduction in the rate of falls and the number of people falling in people hospitalised after their stroke. More studies of this kind should be done to confirm these findings before the results are implemented into clinical practice. There is no evidence at the moment that single lens distance vision glasses instead of multifocal glasses reduce the rate of falls or the number of people falling. In summary, there is little evidence that interventions for preventing falls in people after stroke are beneficial. The main reason is that there were only a limited number of studies focusing on people after stroke or that included a stroke subgroup in the study. More research in this important area for people after stroke is therefore warranted.

Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour la prévention des chutes chez les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC

Il est fréquent que les personnes ayant subi un AVC soient victimes de chutes, celles-ci se produisant chez 7 % des personnes dans la première semaine qui suit leur AVC. Dans la phase ultérieure qui suit un AVC, 55 % à 73 % des personnes chutent au moins une fois dans l'année qui suit leur AVC. Toutes les chutes ne sont pas suffisamment graves pour nécessiter des soins médicaux, mais même les chutes sans gravité peuvent engendrer une peur de la chute. Elles sont un facteur de prédiction des futures chutes, qui peut restreindre les activités de la vie quotidienne d'une personne et donc nécessiter des soins. Cette revue a examiné les méthodes susceptibles d'être efficaces pour prévenir les chutes chez les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC. Après avoir effectué des recherches dans la littérature scientifique, nous avons inclus 10 études portant sur un total de 1 004 participants. Nous avons trouvé des études qui examinaient l'exercice, la prise de médicaments et l'utilisation de lunettes à verres unifocaux pour une vision à distance plutôt que de verres multifocaux pour la prévention des chutes. L'exercice ne semble pas avoir réduit le taux de chutes ou le nombre de personnes faisant des chutes. La majorité des études demandaient uniquement aux participants de faire de l'exercice. Une étude proposait de faire de l'exercice conjointement avec des mesures supplémentaires telles que des séances pédagogiques sur les chutes. Une autre étude proposait la pratique d'exercices associée à une évaluation complète des risques et à des consultations ultérieures, telles qu'un examen par un optométriste ou le port de nouvelles chaussures, conduisant à un programme personnalisé pour la prévention des chutes. Ni l'une ni l'autre de ces deux études n'a réduit le taux de chutes ou le nombre de personnes faisant des chutes. Une étude dans laquelle, après leur AVC, des femmes présentant de faibles niveaux de vitamine D recevaient de la vitamine D et étaient admises en unités de soins de longue durée montrait une réduction du taux de chutes et du nombre de personnes faisant des chutes. Dans une autre étude, l'alendronate conduisait à une réduction du taux de chutes et du nombre de personnes faisant des chutes chez les personnes hospitalisées après leur AVC. D'autres études de ce type doivent être menées pour confirmer ces données avant que les résultats soient appliqués à la pratique clinique. Actuellement il n'existe aucune preuve que les lunettes à verres unifocaux pour une vision à distance réduisent le taux de chutes ou le nombre de personnes faisant des chutes par rapport aux verres multifocaux. En résumé, il existe peu de données prouvant que les interventions de prévention des chutes chez les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC sont bénéfiques. La raison principale en est qu'il n'existe qu'un nombre limité d'études portant sur les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC ou comprenant un sous-groupe de personnes ayant subi un AVC dans l'étude. Des recherches supplémentaires sont donc nécessaires sur cet important sujet pour les personnes ayant été victimes d'un AVC.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.

Laički sažetak

Metode za sprječavanje padova nakon moždanog udara

Padovi su uobičajeni kod osoba koje su doživjele moždani udar, a javljaju se kod 7% pacijenata u prvom tjednu poslije udara. U kasnijim fazama, 55-73% osoba doživi pad godinu dana nakon moždanog udara. Nisu svi padovi toliko ozbiljni da bi zahtijevali liječenje, ali čak i oni koji nisi toliko ozbiljni mogu dovesti do razvoja straha od pada. Oni nagovještaju mogućnost budućih padova, što može ograničiti svakodnevne aktivnosti, što zahtijeva dužnu pozornost. Ovaj Cochrane sustavni pregled analizira koje su metode učinkovite u sprječavanju padova kod osoba nakon moždanog udara. Nakon pretraživanja literature, uključeno je 10 studija s ukupno 1004 sudionika. Pronađene su studije koje istražuju vježbanje, lijekove i uporabe monofokalnih leća za gledanje na daljinu umjesto multifokalnih kod sprječavanja padova. Vježbanje nije pridonijelo smanjenju broja padova kao ni broja osoba koje su padale. U većini studija je jedina istraživana terapija bila vježbanje. Jedna je studija istražila vježbanje u kombinaciji s edukacijom o padovima. Druga studija je ponudila vježbanje zajedno s opsežnom procjenom rizika i nizom preporuka, kao što je pregled vida ili nove cipele, što je personaliziran program za sprječavanje padova. Nijedna od te dvije studije nije smanjila stopu padova ili broj ljudi koji su padali. Jedna studija, u kojoj se davao vitamin D ženama nakon moždanog udara koje su imale niske vrijednosti vitamina D i dugo su se liječile, pokazala je smanjenju stope padova i broja ljudi koji su padali. U drugoj studiji lijek alendronat je doveo do smanjenja stope padova i broja ljudi koji su padali u onih koji su bili smješteni u bolnicu nakon moždanog udara. Potrebno je provesti više takvih studija da bi se potvrdili ti rezultati prije nego se te intervencije uvedu u standardnu kliničku praksu. Nema dokaza u ovom trenutku da uporaba monofokalnih leća za gledanje na daljinu umjesto multifokalnih smanjuju stopu padova ili broj ljudi koji su padali. Sve u svemu, malo je dokaza da su ispitivane metode za sprječavanje padova kod ljudi nakon moždanog udara korisne. Glavni razlog za to je što postoji samo ograničen broj studija fokusiranih na ljude nakon moždanog udara ili koje su uključivale podgrupe s ljudima s moždanim udarom u studije. Stoga je opravdano provesti više istraživanja iz ovog važnog područja kod osoba koje su doživjele moždani udar.

Bilješke prijevoda

Hrvatski Cochrane
Prevele: Kristina Tokić i Ina Tomas
Ovaj sažetak preveden je u okviru volonterskog projekta prevođenja Cochrane sažetaka. Uključite se u projekt i pomozite nam u prevođenju brojnih preostalih Cochrane sažetaka koji su još uvijek dostupni samo na engleskom jeziku. Kontakt: cochrane_croatia@mefst.hr