Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Surgical cytoreduction for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

  1. Thuria Al Rawahi1,
  2. Alberto D Lopes2,
  3. Robert E Bristow3,
  4. Andrew Bryant4,
  5. Ahmed Elattar5,
  6. Supratik Chattopadhyay6,
  7. Khadra Galaal2,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group

Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 28 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008765.pub3


How to Cite

Al Rawahi T, Lopes AD, Bristow RE, Bryant A, Elattar A, Chattopadhyay S, Galaal K. Surgical cytoreduction for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD008765. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008765.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The Royal Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Seeb, Oman

  2. 2

    Princess Alexandra Wing, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Gynaecological Oncology, Truro, Cornwall, UK

  3. 3

    University of California - Irvine, Medical Center, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Orange, CA, USA

  4. 4

    Newcastle University, Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

  5. 5

    City Hospital & Birmingham Treatment Centre, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK

  6. 6

    St James's University Hospital, Gynaecological Oncology, Leeds, UK

*Khadra Galaal, Gynaecological Oncology, Princess Alexandra Wing, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Treliske, Truro, Cornwall, TR1 3LJ, UK. Khadra.Galaal@rcht.cornwall.nhs.uk. khadragalaal@yahoo.co.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The standard management of primary ovarian cancer is optimal cytoreductive surgery followed by platinum-based chemotherapy. Most women with primary ovarian cancer achieve remission on this combination therapy. For women achieving clinical remission after completion of initial treatment, most (60%) with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer will ultimately develop recurrent disease. However, the standard treatment of women with recurrent ovarian cancer remains poorly defined. Surgery for recurrent ovarian cancer has been suggested to be associated with increased overall survival.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of optimal secondary cytoreductive surgery for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. To assess the impact of various residual tumour sizes, over a range between 0 cm and 2 cm, on overall survival.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to December 2012. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For databases other than MEDLINE, the search strategy has been adapted accordingly.

Selection criteria

Retrospective data on residual disease, or data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective/retrospective observational studies that included a multivariate analysis of 50 or more adult women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, who underwent secondary cytoreductive surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy. We only included studies that defined optimal cytoreduction as surgery leading to residual tumours with a maximum diameter of any threshold up to 2 cm.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors (KG, TA) independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where possible the data were synthesised in a meta-analysis.

Main results

There were no RCTs; however, we found nine non-randomised studies that reported on 1194 women with comparison of residual disease after secondary cytoreduction using a multivariate analysis that met our inclusion criteria. These retrospective and prospective studies assessed survival after secondary cytoreductive surgery in women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

Meta- and single-study analyses show the prognostic importance of complete cytoreduction to microscopic disease, since overall survival was significantly prolonged in these groups of women (most studies showed a large statistically significant greater risk of death in all residual disease groups compared to microscopic disease).

Recurrence-free survival was not reported in any of the studies. All of the studies included at least 50 women and used statistical adjustment for important prognostic factors. One study compared sub-optimal (> 1 cm) versus optimal (< 1 cm) cytoreduction and demonstrated benefit to achieving cytoreduction to less than 1 cm, if microscopic disease could not be achieved (hazard ratio (HR) 3.51, 95% CI 1.84 to 6.70). Similarly, one study found that women whose tumour had been cytoreduced to less than 0.5 cm had less risk of death compared to those with residual disease greater than 0.5 cm after surgery (HR not reported; P value < 0.001).

There is high risk of bias due to the non-randomised nature of these studies, where, despite statistical adjustment for important prognostic factors, selection is based on retrospective achievability of cytoreduction, not an intention to treat, and so a degree of bias is inevitable.

Adverse events, quality of life and cost-effectiveness were not reported in any of the studies.

Authors' conclusions

In women with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, ability to achieve surgery with complete cytoreduction (no visible residual disease) is associated with significant improvement in overall survival. However, in the absence of RCT evidence, it is not clear whether this is solely due to surgical effect or due to tumour biology. Indirect evidence would support surgery to achieve complete cytoreduction in selected women. The risks of major surgery need to be carefully balanced against potential benefits on a case-by-case basis.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Surgery to remove tumour so that it is not visible with the naked eye prolongs survival in women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

Epithelial ovarian cancer is a disease in which malignant cells form in the tissue covering the ovary. It accounts for about 90% of ovarian cancers; the remaining 10% arise from germ cells or the sex cords and stroma of the ovary. Women with epithelial ovarian cancer that has returned after primary treatment (recurrent disease) may need secondary surgery to remove all or part of the cancer. When ovarian cancer recurs after more than six months it is considered suitable for further treatment with platinum chemotherapy (platinum sensitive).

The results of this review suggest that surgery may be associated with improved outcomes in terms of prolonging life in some women (platinum-sensitive disease). In particular, surgery removing all visible disease is associated with a significant improvement in survival, although this may be due to the cancer biology facilitating surgery, rather than the surgery itself. We conclude from the current evidence that surgery with the aim of removing all visible disease should be considered in women with recurrent ovarian cancer on an individual basis. However, the data are limited to non-randomised studies with a median age of women in their 50s and early 60s, which may not be representative of all women with ovarian cancer. The risks of major surgery need to be carefully balanced against potential benefits on a case-by-case basis.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Cytoréduction chirurgicale pour le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire récidivant

Contexte

Le traitement standard du cancer primitif de l'ovaire est la chirurgie de réduction tumorale optimale suivie d'une chimiothérapie à base de platine. La plupart des femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien primitif obtiennent une rémission à l'aide de cette combinaison thérapeutique. La plupart (60 %) des femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien épithélial avancé qui obtiennent une rémission clinique après achèvement du traitement initial, finiront par être victimes d'une récurrence de la maladie. Le traitement standard des femmes ayant un cancer ovarien récurrent reste toutefois mal défini. Il y a des signes que la chirurgie du cancer ovarien récurrent serait associée à une survie globale augmentée.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de la chirurgie secondaire de réduction tumorale optimale chez les femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien épithélial récidivant. Évaluer l'impact sur la survie globale de diverses tailles de tumeur résiduelle, dans un intervalle allant de 0 à 2 cm.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur les cancers gynécologiques, MEDLINE, EMBASE et le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) jusqu'à décembre 2012. Nous avons également recherché dans des registres d'essais cliniques, des résumés de rencontres scientifiques et les références bibliographiques des études incluses, et nous avons contacté des experts dans le domaine. Pour les bases de données autres que MEDLINE, la stratégie de recherche a été adaptée comme il convient.

Critères de sélection

Des données rétrospectives sur la maladie résiduelle ou des données issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ou d'études observationnelles prospectives / rétrospectives ayant inclus une analyse multivariée d'au moins 50 femmes adultes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien épithélial récurrent, qui avaient subi une intervention secondaire de cytoréduction avec chimiothérapie adjuvante. Nous n'avons inclus que des études ayant défini la cytoréduction optimale comme une intervention chirurgicale telle que la tumeur résiduelle ne dépasse un certain diamètre d'au maximum 2 cm.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue (KG, TA) ont extrait les données et évalué les risques de biais de façon indépendante. Lorsque cela était possible, les données ont été synthétisées au sein d'une méta-analyse.

Résultats Principaux

Il n'y avait aucun ECR, mais nous avons trouvé neuf études non randomisées qui avaient rendu compte de 1194 femmes avec comparaison de la maladie résiduelle après cytoréduction secondaire au moyen d'une analyse multivariée et qui répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Ces études rétrospectives et prospectives avaient évalué la survie après chirurgie de réduction tumorale secondaire chez des femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien épithélial récidivant.

Des méta-analyses et des analyses mono-étude montrent l'importance pronostique de la cytoréduction complète de la maladie à un niveau microscopique, la survie globale ayant été significativement prolongée chez ces groupes de femmes (la plupart des études avaient montré un grand risque de décès, plus élevé de manière statistiquement significative, dans tous les groupes à maladie résiduelle en comparaison avec la maladie microscopique).

Dans aucune des études, il n'avait été rendu compte de la survie sans récidive. Toutes les études comprenaient au moins 50 femmes et avaient utilisé l'ajustement statistique pour les facteurs pronostiques importants. Une étude avait comparé la cytoréduction sous-optimale (> 1 cm) à l'optimale (< 1 cm ) et avait démontré l'avantage de la cytoréduction à moins de 1 cm, si l'on ne pouvait atteindre un niveau de maladie microscopique (hazard ratio (HR ) 3,51 ; IC à 95% 1,84 à 6,70). De même, une étude avait constaté que les femmes dont la tumeur avait été cytoréduite à moins de 0,5 cm avaient un moindre risque de décès que celles à maladie résiduelle plus grande que 0,5 cm après intervention chirurgicale (HR non rapporté ; valeur P < 0,001).

Il existe un risque élevé de biais en raison de la nature non-randomisée de ces études, où, en dépit de l'ajustement statistique pour les facteurs pronostiques importants, la sélection est basée sur la réalisabilité rétrospective de la cytoréduction, pas en intention de traiter, et un certain degré de biais est donc inévitable.

Dans aucune des études il n'était rendu compte des événements indésirables, de la qualité de vie ou de la rentabilité économique.

Conclusions des auteurs

Chez les femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien récurrent sensible au platine, la capacité de réaliser une intervention chirurgicale avec cytoréduction complète (sans maladie résiduelle visible) est associée à une amélioration significative de la survie globale. Toutefois, en l'absence de preuves issues d'ECR, il n'est pas clair si cela est uniquement dû à l'effet chirurgical ou bien à la biologie tumorale. Des preuves indirectes tendent à étayer la chirurgie visant la cytoréduction complète chez certaines femmes. Les risques d'une intervention chirurgicale majeure doivent être soigneusement mis en balance, au cas par cas, avec les bénéfices potentiels.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Cytoréduction chirurgicale pour le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire récidivant

L'ablation chirurgicale de la tumeur qui rend celle-ci invisible à l'œil nu prolonge la survie des femmes atteintes d'un cancer épithélial de l'ovaire récidivant

Le cancer ovarien épithélial est une maladie dans laquelle des cellules malignes se forment dans les tissus qui recouvrent l'ovaire. Il représente environ 90 % des cancers de l'ovaire, les 10% restants étant issus des cellules germinales ou des cordons sexuels et du stroma de l'ovaire. Les femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien épithélial ayant réapparu après un traitement primaire (maladie récurrente) pourraient nécessiter une intervention chirurgicale secondaire pour enlever tout ou partie du cancer. Lorsque le cancer de l'ovaire réapparaît après plus de six mois, il est considéré comme traitable par la chimiothérapie au platine (sensible au platine).

Les résultats de cette revue suggèrent que la chirurgie pourrait être associée à de meilleurs résultats en termes de prolongement de la vie chez certaines femmes (maladie sensible au platine). En particulier, les interventions chirurgicales qui éliminent toute maladie visible sont associées à une amélioration significative de la survie, bien que cela puisse être dû à la biologie du cancer qui faciliterait la chirurgie, plutôt qu'à la chirurgie elle-même. Les données actuelles permettent de conclure que chez les femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien récurrent il convient d'envisager, sur ​​une base individuelle, une intervention chirurgicale visant à éliminer toute trace visible de la maladie. Les données sont toutefois limitées à des études non randomisées avec un âge médian des femmes dans la cinquantaine et le début de la soixantaine, ce qui n'est peut-être pas représentatif de l'ensemble des femmes atteintes d'un cancer ovarien. Les risques d'une intervention chirurgicale majeure doivent être soigneusement mis en balance, au cas par cas, avec les bénéfices potentiels.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 27th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Ministère de la Santé. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, ministère de la Santé du Québec, Fonds de recherche de Québec-Santé et Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux.