Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Computer-based diabetes self-management interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  1. Kingshuk Pal1,*,
  2. Sophie V Eastwood1,
  3. Susan Michie1,
  4. Andrew J Farmer2,
  5. Maria L Barnard3,
  6. Richard Peacock4,
  7. Bindie Wood1,
  8. Joni D Inniss1,
  9. Elizabeth Murray1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Metabolic and Endocrine Disorders Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 14 NOV 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008776.pub2


How to Cite

Pal K, Eastwood SV, Michie S, Farmer AJ, Barnard ML, Peacock R, Wood B, Inniss JD, Murray E. Computer-based diabetes self-management interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD008776. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008776.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University College London, Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, London, UK

  2. 2

    University of Oxford, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford, UK

  3. 3

    The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Diabetes, London, UK

  4. 4

    Archway Healthcare Library, London, UK

*Kingshuk Pal, Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, Upper Floor 3, Royal Free Hospital, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 PF, UK. k.pal@ucl.ac.uk. drkpal@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Diabetes is one of the commonest chronic medical conditions, affecting around 347 million adults worldwide. Structured patient education programmes reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications four-fold. Internet-based self-management programmes have been shown to be effective for a number of long-term conditions, but it is unclear what  are the essential or effective components of such programmes. If computer-based self-management interventions improve outcomes in type 2 diabetes, they could potentially provide a cost-effective option for reducing the burdens placed on patients and healthcare systems by this long-term condition.

Objectives

To assess the effects on health status and health-related quality of life of computer-based diabetes self-management interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Search methods

We searched six electronic bibliographic databases for published articles and conference proceedings and three online databases for theses (all up to November 2011). Reference lists of relevant reports and reviews were also screened.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials of computer-based self-management interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes, i.e. computer-based software applications that respond to user input and aim to generate tailored content to improve one or more self-management domains through feedback, tailored advice, reinforcement and rewards, patient decision support, goal setting or reminders.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently screened the abstracts and extracted data. A taxonomy for behaviour change techniques was used to describe the active ingredients of the intervention.

Main results

We identified 16 randomised controlled trials with 3578 participants that fitted our inclusion criteria. These studies included a wide spectrum of interventions covering clinic-based brief interventions, Internet-based interventions that could be used from home and mobile phone-based interventions. The mean age of participants was between 46 to 67 years old and mean time since diagnosis was 6 to 13 years. The duration of the interventions varied between 1 to 12 months. There were three reported deaths out of 3578 participants.

Computer-based diabetes self-management interventions currently have limited effectiveness. They appear to have small benefits on glycaemic control (pooled effect on glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): -2.3 mmol/mol or -0.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.4 to -0.1; P = 0.009; 2637 participants; 11 trials). The effect size on HbA1c was larger in the mobile phone subgroup (subgroup analysis: mean difference in HbA1c -5.5 mmol/mol or -0.5% (95% CI -0.7 to -0.3); P < 0.00001; 280 participants; three trials). Current interventions do not show adequate evidence for improving depression, health-related quality of life or weight. Four (out of 10) interventions showed beneficial effects on lipid profile.

One participant withdrew because of anxiety but there were no other documented adverse effects. Two studies provided limited cost-effectiveness data - with one study suggesting costs per patient of less than $140 (in 1997) or 105 EURO and another study showed no change in health behaviour and resource utilisation.

Authors' conclusions

Computer-based diabetes self-management interventions to manage type 2 diabetes appear to have a small beneficial effect on blood glucose control and the effect was larger in the mobile phone subgroup. There is no evidence to show benefits in other biological outcomes or any cognitive, behavioural or emotional outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Using computers to self-manage type 2 diabetes

Diabetes is one of the commonest long-term medical conditions, affecting around 347 million adults worldwide. Around 90% of them have type 2 diabetes and are at significant risk of developing diabetes related complications such as strokes or heart attacks. Patient education programmes can reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications, but many people with type 2 diabetes have never attended structured education programmes to learn how to look after themselves (self-management). Better use of computers might be one way of helping more people learn about self-management.

We identified 16 trials involving 3578 adults that met our criteria. These studies included different types of interventions used in different places like touch screen computers in hospital clinics, computers connected to the Internet at home and programmes that communicated with mobile phones. The average age of people taking part was between 46 to 67 years old and most of those people had lived with diabetes for 6 to 13 years. Participants were given access to the interventions for 1 to 12 months, depending on the intervention. Three out of the 3578 participants died but these deaths did not appear to be linked to the trials.

Overall, there is evidence that computer programmes have a small beneficial effect on blood sugar control - the estimated improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c - a long-term measurement of metabolic control) was 2.3 mmol/mol or 0.2%. This was slightly higher when we looked at studies that used mobile phones to deliver their intervention - the estimated improvement in HbA1c was 5.5 mmol/mol or 0.5% in the studies that used mobile phones. Some of the programmes lowered cholesterol slightly. None of the programmes helped with weight loss or coping with depression.

One participant withdrew because of anxiety but there were no obvious side effects and hypoglycaemic episodes were not reported in any of the studies. There was very little information about costs or value for money.

In summary, existing computer programmes to help adults self-manage type 2 diabetes appear to have a small positive effect on blood sugar control and the mobile phone interventions appeared to have larger effects. There is no evidence to show that current programmes can help with weight loss, depression or improving health-related quality of life but they do appear to be safe.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions d'auto-prise en charge du diabète basées sur ordinateur pour adultes atteints d'un diabète sucré de type 2

Contexte

Le diabète est une des affections chroniques les plus courantes, touchant environ 347 millions d'adultes à travers le monde. Les programmes structurés d'éducation des patients réduisent d'un facteur quatre le risque de complications liées au diabète. Les programmes d'auto-prise en charge sur Internet se sont avérés efficaces pour un certain nombre d'affections chroniques, mais on ne sait pas quelles composantes sont essentielles à l'efficacité de ces programmes. Si les interventions d'auto-prise en charge basées sur ordinateur sont bénéfiques pour le diabète de type 2, elles pourraient constituer une façon rentable de réduire la charge que cette affection chronique fait peser sur les patients et sur les systèmes de santé.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets sur l'état de santé et la qualité de vie liée à la santé des interventions d'auto-prise en charge basées sur ordinateur destinées aux adultes atteints de diabète sucré de type 2.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons cherché des articles publiés et des actes de conférences dans six bases de données bibliographiques électroniques, et des thèses dans trois bases de données en ligne (le tout jusqu'à novembre 2011). Nous avons également passé au crible les références bibliographiques de rapports et revues pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés d'interventions d'auto-prise en charge basées sur ordinateur pour adultes diabétiques de type 2, c.-à-d. des logiciels informatiques qui inter-agissent avec l'utilisateur et visent à générer un contenu adapté pour améliorer un ou plusieurs domaines d'auto-prise en charge par la rétroaction, les conseils sur mesure, le renforcement et les récompenses, l'aide à la décision, l'établissement d'objectifs ou les rappels.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont, de manière indépendante, passé au crible les résumés et extrait les données. Nous avons utilisé une taxonomie des techniques de modification du comportement pour décrire les ingrédients actifs de l'intervention.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié 16 essais contrôlés randomisés répondant à nos critères d'inclusion et qui totalisaient 3578 participants. Ces études avaient porté sur un large éventail d'interventions couvrant les brèves interventions en clinique, les interventions basées sur Internet pouvant être utilisées à domicile et les interventions basées sur les téléphones mobiles. L'âge moyen des participants était entre 46 à 67 ans et le temps moyen écoulé depuis le diagnostic se situait entre 6 et 13 ans. La durée des interventions variait entre 1 et 12 mois. Trois décès avaient été signalés parmi les 3578 participants.

Les interventions d'auto-prise en charge du diabète basées sur ordinateur n'ont actuellement qu'une efficacité limitée. Elles semblent être légèrement bénéfiques pour le contrôle glycémique (effet regroupé sur l'hémoglobine glycosylée A1C (HbA1c) : -2,3 mmol/mol, soit -0,2 % (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % -0,4 à -0,1 ; P = 0,009 ; 2637 participants ; 11 essais). L'ampleur de l'effet sur ​​l'HbA1c était supérieure dans le sous-groupe de téléphonie mobile (analyse en sous-groupes : différence moyenne du taux d'HbA1c -5,5 mmol/mol, soit -0,5 % (IC à 95% -0,7 à -0,3 ; P <0,00001 ; 280 participants ; trois essais). Les interventions actuelles n'attestent pas d'une capacité à améliorer la dépression, la qualité de vie liée à la santé ou le poids. Quatre interventions (sur 10) avaient eu des effets bénéfiques sur le profil lipidique.

Un participant s'était retiré pour raison d'anxiété, mais aucun autre effet indésirable n'avait été signalé. Deux études avaient fourni quelques données sur la rentabilité - une étude parlait de coûts par patient inférieurs à 140 $ (en 1997), soit 105 Euro, et une autre étude n'avait pas constaté de changement dans les comportements de santé et l'utilisation des ressources.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les interventions d'auto-prise en charge du diabète basées sur ordinateur pour le diabète de type 2 semblent avoir un léger effet bénéfique sur le contrôle glycémique, l'effet étant plus important dans le sous-groupe de téléphone mobile. Il n'existe aucune preuve de bénéfices pour d'autres critères de résultat biologiques ou au niveau cognitif, comportemental ou émotionnel.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions d'auto-prise en charge du diabète basées sur ordinateur pour adultes atteints d'un diabète sucré de type 2

L'utilisation d'ordinateurs pour gérer soi-même son diabète de type 2

Le diabète est une des affections à long terme les plus courantes, touchant environ 347 millions d'adultes à travers le monde. Environ 90 % d'entre eux sont atteints d'un diabète de type 2 et ont un risque important de développer des complications liées au diabète telles que des accidents vasculaires cérébraux (AVC) ou des crises cardiaques. Les programmes d'éducation des patients peuvent réduire le risque de complications liées au diabète, mais de nombreuses personnes souffrant d'un diabète de type 2 n'ont jamais participé à des programmes d'éducation structurés pour apprendre à se gérer elles-mêmes (auto-prise en charge). Une meilleure utilisation des ordinateurs pourrait aider un plus grand nombre de gens à découvrir l'auto-prise en charge.

Nous avons identifié 16 essais remplissant nos critères d'inclusion et qui totalisaient 3578 personnes. Ces études avaient porté sur différents types d'interventions utilisées en différents lieux, comme les ordinateurs à écran tactile dans les cliniques hospitalières, les ordinateurs à domicile connectés à Internet et les programmes qui communiquaient avec les téléphones mobiles. L'âge moyen des participants se situait entre 46 et 67 ans et la plupart de ces personnes souffraient du diabète depuis 6 à 13 ans. Les participants avaient eu accès aux interventions pendant une période de 1 à 12 mois, selon l'intervention. Trois des 3578 participants étaient décédés, mais ces décès ne semblaient pas être liés aux essais.

Au total, il y a des preuves que les programmes basés sur ordinateur ont un léger effet bénéfique sur le contrôle du sucre dans le sang - l'amélioration estimée de l'hémoglobine glycosylée A1c (HbA1c - une mesure à long terme du contrôle métabolique) était de 2,3 mmol/mol, soit 0,2 %. Ce chiffre était légèrement plus élevé lorsque les études utilisaient les téléphones mobiles pour réaliser leur intervention - l'amélioration du taux d'HbA1c était estimée à 5,5 mmol/mol, soit 0,5 %, dans les études ayant utilisé les téléphones mobiles. Certains de ces programmes avaient légèrement réduit le taux de cholestérol. Aucun des programmes n'avait aidé à perdre du poids ou à faire face à la dépression.

Un participant s'était retiré pour raison d'anxiété, mais il n'y avait pas eu d'effets secondaires évidents et aucune des études n'avait rendu compte d'épisodes d'hypoglycémie. Il y avait très peu d'informations sur les coûts et la rentabilité.

En résumé, les programmes informatiques existants pour aider les adultes à gérer par eux-mêmes leur diabète de type 2 semblent avoir un léger effet positif sur le contrôle de la glycémie et les interventions sur téléphone mobile semblent avoir des effets plus importants. Aucune donnée n'indique que les programmes actuels puissent aider en matière de perte de poids, de dépression ou d'amélioration de la qualité de vie liée à la santé, mais ils semblent être sans danger.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�