Diagnostic Test Accuracy Review

You have free access to this content

Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)

  1. Craig Ritchie1,*,
  2. Nadja Smailagic2,
  3. Anna H Noel-Storr3,
  4. Yemisi Takwoingi4,
  5. Leon Flicker5,
  6. Sam E Mason6,
  7. Rupert McShane3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group

Published Online: 10 JUN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 3 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008782.pub4


How to Cite

Ritchie C, Smailagic N, Noel-Storr AH, Takwoingi Y, Flicker L, Mason SE, McShane R. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD008782. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008782.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Imperial College London, London, UK

  2. 2

    University of Cambridge, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK

  3. 3

    University of Oxford, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Oxford, UK

  4. 4

    University of Birmingham, Public Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Birmingham, UK

  5. 5

    University of Western Australia, Western Australian Centre for Health & Ageing - WACHA, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

  6. 6

    Imperial College Medical School, London, UK

*Craig Ritchie, Imperial College London, London, UK. c.ritchie@imperial.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 10 JUN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

According to the latest revised National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (now known as the Alzheimer's Association) (NINCDS-ADRDA) diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease dementia of the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer Association, the confidence in diagnosing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease dementia is raised with the application of biomarkers based on measures in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or imaging. These tests, added to core clinical criteria, might increase the sensitivity or specificity of a testing strategy. However, the accuracy of biomarkers in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease dementia and other dementias has not yet been systematically evaluated. A formal systematic evaluation of sensitivity, specificity, and other properties of plasma and CSF amyloid beta (Aß) biomarkers was performed.

Objectives

To determine the accuracy of plasma and CSF Aß levels for detecting those patients with MCI who would convert to Alzheimer's disease dementia or other forms of dementia over time.

Search methods

The most recent search for this review was performed on 3 December 2012. We searched MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), BIOSIS Previews (ISI Web of Knowledge), Web of Science and Conference Proceedings (ISI Web of Knowledge), PsycINFO (OvidSP), and LILACS (BIREME). We also requested a search of the Cochrane Register of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Studies (managed by the Cochrane Renal Group).

No language or date restrictions were applied to the electronic searches and methodological filters were not used so as to maximise sensitivity.

Selection criteria

We selected those studies that had prospectively well defined cohorts with any accepted definition of cognitive decline, but no dementia, with baseline CSF or plasma Aß levels, or both, documented at or around the time the above diagnoses were made. We also included studies which looked at data from those cohorts retrospectively, and which contained sufficient data to construct two by two tables expressing plasma and CSF Aß biomarker results by disease status. Moreover, studies were only selected if they applied a reference standard for Alzheimer's dementia diagnosis, for example the NINCDS-ADRDA or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria.

Data collection and analysis

We screened all titles generated by the electronic database searches. Two review authors independently assessed the abstracts of all potentially relevant studies. We assessed the identified full papers for eligibility and extracted data to create standard two by two tables. Two independent assessors performed quality assessment using the QUADAS-2 tool. Where data allowed, we derived estimates of sensitivity at fixed values of specificity from the model we fitted to produce the summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve.

Main results

Alzheimer's disease dementia was evaluated in 14 studies using CSF Aß42. Of the 1349 participants included in the meta-analysis, 436 developed Alzheimer’s dementia. Individual study estimates of sensitivity were between 36% and 100% while the specificities were between 29% and 91%. Because of the variation in assay thresholds, we did not estimate summary sensitivity and specificity. However, we derived estimates of sensitivity at fixed values of specificity from the model we fitted to produce the summary ROC curve. At the median specificity of 64%, the sensitivity was 81% (95% CI 72 to 87). This equated to a positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 2.22 (95% CI 2.00 to 2.47) and a negative likelihood ratio (LR–) of 0.31 (95% CI 0.21 to 0.48).

The accuracy of CSF Aß42 for all forms of dementia was evaluated in four studies. Of the 464 participants examined, 188 developed a form of dementia (Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia).The thresholds used were between 209 mg/ml and 512 ng/ml. The sensitivities were between 56% and 75% while the specificities were between 47% and 76%. At the median specificity of 75%, the sensitivity was estimated to be 63% (95% CI 22 to 91) from the meta-analytic model. This equated to a LR+ of 2.51 (95% CI 1.30 to 4.86) and a LR– of 0.50 (95% CI 0.16 to 1.51).

The accuracy of CSF Aß42 for non-Alzheimer's disease dementia was evaluated in three studies. Of the 385 participants examined, 61 developed non-Alzheimer's disease dementia. Since there were very few studies and considerable variation between studies, the results were not meta-analysed. The sensitivities were between 8% and 63% while the specificities were between 35% and 67%.

Only one study examined the accuracy of plasma Aß42 and the plasma Aß42/Aß40 ratio for Alzheimer's disease dementia. The sensitivity of 86% (95% CI 81 to 90) was the same for both tests while the specificities were 50% (95% CI 44 to 55) and 70% (95% CI 64 to 75) for plasma Aß42 and the plasma Aß42/Aß40 ratio respectively. Of the 565 participants examined, 245 developed Alzheimer’s dementia and 87 non-Alzheimer's disease dementia.

There was substantial heterogeneity between studies. The accuracy of Aß42 for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia did not differ significantly (P = 0.8) between studies that pre-specified the threshold for determining test positivity (n = 6) and those that only determined the threshold at follow-up (n = 8). One study excluded a sample of MCI non-Alzheimer's disease dementia converters from their analysis. In sensitivity analyses, the exclusion of this study had no impact on our findings. The exclusion of eight studies (950 patients) that were considered at high (n = 3) or unclear (n = 5) risk of bias for the patient selection domain also made no difference to our findings.

Authors' conclusions

The proposed diagnostic criteria for prodromal dementia and MCI due to Alzheimer's disease, although still being debated, would be fulfilled where there is both core clinical and cognitive criteria and a single biomarker abnormality. From our review, the measure of abnormally low CSF Aß levels has very little diagnostic benefit with likelihood ratios suggesting only marginal clinical utility. The quality of reports was also poor, and thresholds and length of follow-up were inconsistent. We conclude that when applied to a population of patients with MCI, CSF Aß levels cannot be recommended as an accurate test for Alzheimer's disease.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Proteins in blood and cerebrospinal fluids for early prediction of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia in people with cognitive problems

The numbers of people with dementia and other cognitive problems are increasing globally. A diagnosis of the pre-dementia phase of disease is recommended but there is no agreement on the best approach. A range of tests have been developed which healthcare professionals can use to assess people with poor memory or cognitive impairment. In this review, however, we have found that measuring protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF amyloid beta (Aβ40) or CSF Aβ42), as a single test, lacks the accuracy to identify those patients with mild cognitive impairment who would develop Alzheimer's disease dementia or other forms of dementia.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La protéine bêta-amyloïde dans le plasma sanguin et le liquide céphalorachidien pour le diagnostic de la maladie d'Alzheimer et d'autres démences chez les personnes atteintes de déficit cognitif léger

Contexte

D'après la dernière version des critères de diagnostic de la maladie d'Alzheimer du NINCDS-ADRDA (National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke - Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association, désormais dénominée Alzheimer's Association), révisés par le National Institute on Aging et l'Alzheimer's Association, la confiance dans le diagnostic de déficit cognitif léger (DCL) dû à la démence d'Alzheimer est renforcée par l'utilisation de biomarqueurs sur la base de mesures dans le liquide céphalorachidien (LCR) ou de l'imagerie médicale. Ces examens, ajoutés à un noyau de critères cliniques, pourraient accroître la sensibilité ou la spécificité d'une stratégie diagnostique. Cependant, l'efficacité diagnostique des biomarqueurs dans la démence d'Alzheimer et d'autres démences n'a pas encore été évaluée de manière systématique. Une évaluation formelle systématique de la sensibilité et de la spécificité, et d'autres propriétés des biomarqueurs bêta-amyloïdes (Aβ) dans le plasma et le LCR a été réalisée.

Objectifs

Déterminer l'efficacité diagnostique des taux d'Aβ dans le plasma et le LCR pour la détection de ceux des patients atteints de DCL qui évolueront au fil du temps vers une démence d'Alzheimer ou une autre forme de démence.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

La recherche la plus récente pour cette revue a été réalisée le 3 décembre 2012. Nous avons effectué des recherches dans MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), BIOSIS Previews (ISI Web of Knowledge), Web of Science and Conference Proceedings (ISI Web of Knowledge), PsycINFO (OvidSP) et LILACS (BIREME). Nous avons également demandé une recherche dans le registre Cochrane des tests diagnostiques (pris en charge par le groupe Cochrane sur la néphrologie).

Aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date n'a été appliquée aux recherches électroniques et des filtres méthodologiques n'ont pas été utilisés afin de maximiser la sensibilité.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné les études qui avaient des cohortes prospectives bien définies avec n'importe quelle définition acceptée du déclin cognitif, mais sans démence, comportant les taux au départ d'Aβ dans le plasma ou le LCR ou les deux, documentés aux alentours du moment où les diagnostics ci-dessus ont été faits. Nous avons également inclus des études qui avaient étudié les données issues de ces cohortes rétrospectivement, et qui contenaient des données suffisantes pour construire des tableaux croisés 2x2 pour exprimer les résultats du biomarqueur Aβ dans le plasma et le LCR selon l'état de la maladie. En outre, les études n'ont été sélectionnées que si elles avaient appliqué une norme référencée pour le diagnostic de la maladie d'Alzheimer, par exemple les critères du NINCDS-ADRDA ou du Manuel diagnostique et statistique des troubles mentaux, quatrième révision (DSM-IV)

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons examiné tous les titres générés par les recherches dans les bases de données électroniques. Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué les résumés de toutes les études potentiellement pertinentes. Nous avons évalué le texte intégral des articles identifiés pour l'éligibilité et extrait les données pour créer des tableaux croisés 2x2. Deux évaluateurs indépendants ont effectué des évaluations de la qualité à l'aide de l'outil QUADAS-2. Lorsque les données le permettaient, nous avons déduit des estimations de sensibilité à des valeurs fixes de spécificité à partir du modèle que nous avons ajusté pour produire la courbe ROC (receiver operating characteristic) de synthèse.

Résultats principaux

La démence d'Alzheimer a été évaluée dans 14 études utilisant l'Aβ42 dans le LCR. Des 1 349 participants inclus dans la méta-analyse, 436 ont développé une démence d'Alzheimer. Les estimations de sensibilité des études individuelles se sont situées entre 36 % et 100 % alors que les spécificités se sont situées entre 29 % et 91 %. En raison de la variabilité dans les seuils des tests, nous n'avons pas estimé globalement la sensibilité et la spécificité. Cependant, nous avons déduit des estimations de sensibilité à des valeurs fixes de spécificité à partir du modèle que nous avons ajusté pour produire la courbe ROC de synthèse. À la spécificité médiane de 64 %, la sensibilité était de 81 % (IC à 95 % de 72 à 87). Cela équivaut à un rapport de vraisemblance positif (RV+) de 2,22 (IC à 95 % de 2,00 à 2,47) et à un rapport de vraisemblance négatif (RV-) de 0,31 (IC à 95 % de 0,21 à 0,48).

L'efficacité diagnostique de l'Aβ42 dans le LCR pour toutes formes de démence a été évaluée dans quatre études. Des 464 participants étudiés, 188 ont développé une forme de démence (démence d'Alzheimer et autres formes de démence). Les seuils utilisés étaient compris entre 209 mg/ml et 512 ng/ml. Les sensibilités étaient entre 56 % et 75 %, tandis que les spécificités étaient entre 47 % et 76 %. À la spécificité médiane de 75 %, la sensibilité a été estimé à 63 % (IC à 95 % de 22 à 91) à partir du modèle de la méta-analyse. Cela équivaut à un RV+ de 2,51 (IC à 95 % de 1,30 à 4,86) et un RV- de 0,50 (IC à 95 % de 0,16 à 1,51).

L'efficacité diagnostique de l'Aβ42 pour la démence non-Alzheimer a été évaluée dans trois études. Des 385 participants examinés, 61 ont développé une démence non-Alzheimer. Étant donné qu'il y avait très peu d'études et une variation considérable entre celles-ci, les résultats n'ont pas fait l'objet d'une méta-analyse. Les sensibilités étaient entre 8 % et 63 %, tandis que les spécificités étaient entre 35 % et 67 %.

Une seule étude a étudié l'efficacité diagnostique de l'Aβ42 plasmatique et du rapport Aβ42/Aβ40 dans le plasma pour la démence d'Alzheimer. La sensibilité de 86  (IC à 95 % de 81 à 90) était identique pour les deux examens tandis que les spécificités ont été de 50 % (IC à 95 % de 44 à 55) et de 70 % (IC à 95 % de 64 à 75) pour respectivement l'Aβ42 plasmatique et le rapport Aβ42/Aβ40 dans le plasma. Des 565 participants étudiés, 245 ont développé une démence d'Alzheimer et 87 une démence non-Alzheimer.

Il y avait une hétérogénéité importante entre les études. L'efficacité diagnostique de l'Aβ42 pour la démence d'Alzheimer ne différait pas significativement (P = 0,8) entre les études qui avaient prédéfini le seuil déterminant la positivité du test (n = 6) et les études qui n'ont déterminé ce seuil que lors du suivi (n = 8). Une étude avait exclu un échantillon de DCL convertis en démences non-Alzheimer de leur analyse. Dans les analyses de sensibilité, l'exclusion de cette étude n'a eu aucun impact sur nos résultats. L'exclusion de huit études (950 patients) qui ont été considérées comme à risque de biais élevé (n = 3) ou incertain (n = 5) dans le domaine de la sélection des patients n'a également fait aucune différence dans nos résultats.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les critères de diagnostic proposés pour la prédémence et le DCL dus à la maladie d'Alzheimer, bien que faisant encore l'objet de débats, seraient remplis si des critères de base cliniques et cognitifs et une anomalie d'un biomarqueur étaient associés. D'après notre revue, la mesure de niveaux anormalement faibles d'Aβ dans le LCR a très peu de bénéfice diagnostique, avec des rapports de vraisemblance suggérant simplement une utilité clinique marginale. La qualité des rapports était médiocre, et les seuils et la durée du suivi étaient disparates. Nous en concluons que les taux d'Aβ dans le LCR, appliqués à une population de patients DCL, ne peuvent pas être recommandés comme test diagnostic efficace pour la maladie d'Alzheimer.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les protéines dans le sang et le liquide céphalorachidien en vue de prédire précocement le développement d'une maladie d'Alzheimer ou d'autres démences chez les personnes atteintes de problèmes cognitifs.

Le nombre de personnes atteintes de démence et d'autres problèmes cognitifs est en augmentation partout dans le monde. Un diagnostic de la phase de pré-démence de la maladie est recommandé, mais il n'y a pas de consensus sur la meilleure approche. Une série de tests ont été développés que les professionnels de santé peuvent utiliser pour évaluer les personnes présentant une mémoire défaillante ou un déficit cognitif. Dans cette revue, cependant, nous avons trouvé que la mesure de la protéine bêta-amyloïde (Aβ40, Aβ42) dans le liquide céphalorachidien (LCR) en tant qu'analyse unique, manque de précision pour identifier ceux des patients atteints de déficit cognitif léger qui développeront une démence d'Alzheimer ou une autre forme de démence.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 9th October, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé