Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer

  1. Katja I Braam1,
  2. Patrick van der Torre2,†,*,
  3. Tim Takken2,
  4. Margreet A Veening1,
  5. Eline van Dulmen-den Broeder1,
  6. Gertjan JL Kaspers3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Childhood Cancer Group

Published Online: 30 APR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008796.pub2


How to Cite

Braam KI, van der Torre P, Takken T, Veening MA, van Dulmen-den Broeder E, Kaspers GJL. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD008796. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008796.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    VU University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Oncology/Hematology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  2. 2

    Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Child Development and Exercise Center, Utrecht, Netherlands

  3. 3

    VU University Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics, Division of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  1. Joint first authorship with Katja I. Braam

*Patrick van der Torre, Child Development and Exercise Center, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85090, Utrecht, 3508 AB, Netherlands. p.vandertorre@umcutrecht.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 30 APR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

A decreased physical fitness and impaired social functioning has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of disease and treatment of childhood cancer and by behavioural and social elements. Exercise training for adults during or after cancer therapy has frequently been reported to improve physical fitness and social functioning. More recently, literature on this subject became available for children and young adults with cancer, both during and after treatment.

Objectives

This review aimed to evaluate the effect of a physical exercise training intervention (at home, at a physical therapy centre, or hospital based) on the physical fitness of children with cancer, in comparison with the physical fitness in a care as usual control group. The intervention needed to be offered within the first five years from diagnosis.

The second aim was to assess the effects of a physical exercise training intervention in this population on fatigue, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, and health-related quality of life and to assess the adverse effects of the intervention.

Search methods

For this review the electronic databases of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, and ongoing trial registries were searched on 6 September 2011. In addition, a handsearch of reference lists and conference proceedings was performed in that same month.

Selection criteria

The review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that compared the effects of physical exercise training with no training, in people who were within the first five years of their diagnosis of childhood cancer.

Data collection and analysis

By the use of standardised forms two review authors independently identified studies meeting the inclusion criteria, performed the data extraction, and assessed the risk of bias. Quality of the studies was rated by using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria.

Main results

Five articles were included in this review: four RCTs (14, 14, 28, and 51 participants) and one CCT (24 participants). In total 131 participants (74 boys, 54 girls, three unknown) were included in the analysis, all being treated for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The study interventions were all implemented during chemotherapy treatment.

The duration of the training sessions ranged from 15 to 60 minutes per session. Both the type of intervention, as well as the intervention period, which ranged from 10 weeks to two years, varied in all the included studies. In all included studies the control group received care as usual.

All studies had methodological limitations, such as small numbers of participants, unclear randomisation methods, and single-blind study designs in case of an RCT.

Cardiorespiratory fitness was studied by the use of the nine-minute run-walk test, the timed up-and-down stairs test, and the 20-m shuttle run test. Only the up-and-down stairs test showed significant differences between the intervention and the control group, in favour of the intervention group (P value = 0.05, no further information available).

Bone mineral density was assessed in one study, in which a statistically significant difference in favour of the exercise group was identified (standardised mean difference (SMD) 1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 1.66; P value < 0.001). Body mass index was assessed in two studies. The pooled data on this item did not show a statistically significant difference between the intervention and control study group.

Flexibility was assessed in three studies. In one study the active ankle dorsiflexion method was used to assess flexibility and the second study they used the passive ankle dorsiflexion test. No statistically significant difference between the intervention and control group was identified with the active ankle dorsiflexion test, whereas with the passive test method a statistically significant difference in favour of the exercise group was found (SMD 0.69; 95% CI 0.12 to 1.25; P value = 0.02). The third study assessed body flexibility by the use of the sit-and-reach distance test; no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control group was identified.

One study assessed the effects of an inspiratory muscle training programme aimed to train the lung muscles and increase physical fitness. This study reported no significant effect on either inspiratory or expiratory muscle strength. Two other studies using either knee and ankle strength changes by hand-held dynamometry or the number of completed push-ups (with knees on the ground) and a peripheral quantitative computed tomography of the tibia to determine the muscle mass did not identify statistically significant differences in muscle strength/endurance.

The level of daily activity, health-related quality of life, fatigue, and adverse events were assessed in one study only; for all these items no statistically significant differences between the intervention and control group were found.

None of the included studies evaluated the outcomes activity energy expenditure, time spent exercising, anxiety and depression, or self efficacy.

Authors' conclusions

The effects of physical exercise training interventions for childhood cancer participants are not yet convincing due to small numbers of participants and insufficient study methodology. Despite that, first results show a trend towards an improved physical fitness in the intervention group compared to the control group. Changes in physical fitness were seen by improved body composition, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory fitness. However, the evidence is limited and these positive effects were not found for the other assessed outcomes, such as muscle strength/endurance, the level of daily activity, health-related quality of life, and fatigue. There is a need for more studies with comparable aims and interventions, using higher numbers of participants and for studies with another childhood cancer population than ALL only.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer

Childhood cancer is much less common than adult cancer at around 144 to 148 cases per one million children (Cancer Research UK 2011; National Cancer Institute 2012). An intensive treatment, including combined treatment modalities such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or a combination, is often needed for cure. These treatment modalities are frequently accompanied by adverse events, such as nausea, serious infections, organ damage (heart, lung, kidney, liver), decreased bone density, but also decreased muscle strength and physical fitness.

In the past, children were advised to recover in bed, and to take as much rest as needed. Nowadays, it is considered that too much immobility may result in a further decrease of physical fitness and physical functioning. These adverse effects might be prevented or minimised by introducing a physical exercise training intervention during, or shortly after, childhood cancer treatment.

This review includes four randomised controlled trials and one clinical controlled trial that evaluated the effects of a physical exercise training programme in children during cancer treatment. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common type of childhood cancer. For that reason, researchers often focus on this type of cancer. In total 131 participants with ALL were included in the analysis. The results of the review show that physical exercise training interventions can be performed in children with this type of cancer and that there are some small benefits on body composition (percentage of fat mass, muscles, and bones), flexibility, and cardiorespiratory fitness (endurance capacity). However, the evidence for a benefit on physical fitness of these interventions is limited due to methodological limitations of the included studies. More studies assessing the effects of exercise on body composition, muscle functioning, daily activity, psychological functioning, or a combination of these, are needed. Furthermore, the current findings do not provide enough evidence to identify the optimal physical exercise training programme for children with cancer, neither do they provide information on the characteristics of people who will, or will not, benefit from such a programme. These important issues still need to be clarified.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions d'exercice physique pour enfants et jeunes adultes pendant et après un traitement pour cancer infantile

Contexte

Il a été fait état d'une baisse de la condition physique et d'une altération du fonctionnement social chez les patients et les survivants de cancer infantile. Cela tient aux effets négatifs de la maladie et du traitement des cancers infantiles ainsi qu'à des éléments comportementaux et sociaux. Il a souvent été rapporté que, chez l'adulte, l'exercice physique pendant ou après le traitement du cancer améliorait la condition physique et le fonctionnement social. Plus récemment, une littérature sur ce sujet est apparue concernant les enfants et les jeunes adultes atteints de cancer, tant pendant qu'après le traitement.

Objectifs

Cette revue avait pour objectif d'évaluer l'effet des interventions d'exercice physique (à domicile, dans un centre de kinésithérapie ou à l'hôpital) sur la condition physique des enfants atteints de cancer, en comparaison avec la condition physique dans un groupe témoin soigné de manière habituelle. L'intervention devait avoir été offerte au cours des cinq premières années suivant le diagnostic.

Le deuxième objectif était d'évaluer les effets d'une intervention d'exercice physique dans cette population sur la fatigue, l'anxiété, la dépression, la perception de sa propre efficacité et la qualité de vie liée à la santé, ainsi que d'évaluer les effets indésirables de l'intervention.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Pour les besoins de cette revue, nous avons effectué une recherche dans les bases de données électroniques CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Pedro et dans des registres d'essais en cours, jusqu'au 6 septembre 2011. Nous avons, par ailleurs, passé manuellement au crible le même mois des références bibliographiques et des actes de conférences.

Critères de sélection

La revue comprenait des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et des essais cliniques contrôlés (ECC) ayant comparé les effets de l'exercice physique à l'absence d'exercice, chez des personnes se trouvant dans les cinq premières années suivant leur diagnostic de cancer infantile.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont, de manière indépendante et au moyen de formulaires standardisés, identifié les études satisfaisant aux critères d'inclusion, effectué l'extraction des données et évalué le risque de biais. La qualité des études a été évaluée à l’aide des critères du système GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation).

Résultats Principaux

Cinq articles ont été inclus dans cette revue : quatre ECR (14, 14, 28 et 51 participants) et un ECC (24 participants). Au total, 131 participants (74 garçons, 54 filles, trois de sexe inconnu) ont été inclus dans l'analyse, tous traités pour leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA) de l'enfant. Les interventions étudiées avaient toutes été mises en œuvre pendant la chimiothérapie.

La durée des sessions d'exercice variait de 15 à 60 minutes. Le type d'intervention ainsi que la longueur de la période d'intervention, qui allait de 10 semaines à deux ans, variaient dans toutes les études incluses. Dans toutes les études incluses le groupe témoin avait reçu les soins habituels.

Toutes les études comportaient des limitations méthodologiques, telles que de petits nombres de participants, des méthodes de randomisation peu claires, et des conceptions en simple aveugle pour les ECR.

La condition cardiorespiratoire avait été étudiée à l'aide du test de marche-course à pied de neuf minutes, le test chronométré de montée et descente d'escalier, et le test de course-navette de 20 m. Seul le test de montée et descente d'escalier avait révélé des différences significatives entre les groupes d'intervention et de contrôle, en faveur du groupe d'intervention (P = 0,05 ; aucune autre information disponible).

La densité minérale osseuse avait été évaluée dans une étude où une différence statistiquement significative en faveur du groupe à exercice avait été identifiée (différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) 1,07 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 0,48 à 1,66 ; P <0,001). L'indice de masse corporelle avait été évalué dans deux études. Les données regroupées sur cet élément n'ont pas mis en évidence de différence statistiquement significative entre les groupes d'intervention et de contrôle.

La souplesse avait été évaluée dans trois études. Dans une étude, la méthode de dorsiflexion active de la cheville avait été utilisée pour évaluer la souplesse, et la seconde étude avait utilisé le test de dorsiflexion passive de la cheville. Aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les groupes d'intervention et de contrôle n'avait été observée avec le test de dorsiflexion active de la cheville, alors qu'une différence statistiquement significative en faveur du groupe d'exercice avait été trouvée avec la méthode de test passif (DMS 0,69 ; IC 95% 0,12 à 1,25 ; P = 0,02). La troisième étude avait évalué la souplesse corporelle au moyen du test de flexion du tronc en position assise ; aucune différence statistiquement significative n'avait été identifiée entre les groupes d'intervention et de contrôle.

Une étude avait évalué les effets d'un programme d'entrainement respiratoire visant à exercer les muscles pulmonaires et à augmenter la forme physique. Cette étude n'avait rapporté aucun effet significatif sur la force musculaire inspiratoire ou expiratoire. Deux autres études ayant utilisé soit les changements de force du genou et de la cheville mesurés par dynamométrie portable, soit le nombre de pompes complètes (avec genoux au sol) et une mesure quantitative périphérique du tibia par tomographie pour déterminer la masse musculaire, n'avaient pas identifié de différences statistiquement significatives au niveau de la force / l'endurance musculaire.

Les niveaux d'activité quotidienne, de qualité de vie liée à la santé, de fatigue et d'événements indésirables n'avaient été évalués que dans une seule étude ; pour tous ces critères, il n'avait pas été trouvé de différences statistiquement significatives entre les groupes d'intervention et de contrôle.

Aucune des études incluses n'avait évalué les critères de résultat suivants : dépense énergétique découlant de l'activité physique, temps passé à s'exercer, anxiété et dépression, ou perception de sa propre efficacité.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les effets des interventions d'exercice physique pour les participants atteints de cancer infantile ne sont pas encore convaincants en raison du petit nombre de participants et de la méthodologie insuffisante des études. Malgré cela, les premiers résultats montrent une tendance à une amélioration de la condition physique dans le groupe d'intervention comparativement au groupe témoin. Les changements dans la condition physique ont été perçus au niveau de l'amélioration de la composition corporelle, de la souplesse et de la condition cardiorespiratoire. Les données sont toutefois limitées et ces effets positifs n'ont pas été observés pour les autres critères de résultat évalués, tels que la force / l'endurance musculaire, le niveau d'activité quotidienne, la qualité de vie liée à la santé et la fatigue. Il y a un besoin d'études supplémentaires aux objectifs et interventions comparables et portant sur de plus grands nombres de participants, ainsi que d'études incluant une autre population de cancer infantile plutôt que la seule LLA.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions d'exercice physique pour enfants et jeunes adultes pendant et après un traitement pour cancer infantile

Interventions d'exercice physique pour enfants et jeunes adultes pendant et après un traitement pour cancer infantile

Les cancers de l'enfant sont beaucoup moins fréquents que les cancer de l'adulte : environ 144 à 148 cas par million d'enfants (Cancer Research UK 2011; National Cancer Institute 2012). Un traitement intensif, notamment la combinaison de modalités de traitement telles que la chirurgie, la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie, est souvent nécessaire pour les guérir. Ces modalités de traitement produisent souvent des effets indésirables, tels que des nausées, des infections graves, des dommages aux organes (cœur, poumon, rein, foie), une diminution de la densité osseuse, mais aussi une baisse de la force musculaire et de la condition physique.

Dans le passé, on recommandait que les enfants gardent le lit et se reposent autant que nécessaire. De nos jours, il est considéré que trop d'immobilité peut entraîner une baisse supplémentaire de la condition physique et du fonctionnement physique. Ces effets indésirables peuvent être évités ou minimisés par l'introduction d'une intervention d'exercice physique pendant, ou tout de suite après, le traitement du cancer infantile.

Cette revue comprend quatre essais contrôlés randomisés et un essai clinique contrôlé qui avaient évalué les effets d'un programme d'exercice physique pour enfants en cours de traitement anticancéreux. La leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA) infantile est le type de cancer le plus commun chez l'enfant. C'est pourquoi les chercheurs se concentrent souvent sur ce type de cancer. Au total, 131 participants atteints de LLA ont été inclus dans l'analyse. Les résultats de la revue montrent que des interventions d'exercice physique peut être pratiquées chez les enfants atteints de ce type de cancer et que cela est de quelque bénéfice pour la composition corporelle (pourcentage de graisse, de muscles et d'os), la souplesse et la condition cardiorespiratoire (la capacité d'endurance). Toutefois, les preuves d'un bénéfice de ces interventions sur la condition physique sont entachées par les limitations méthodologiques des études incluses. De nouvelles études sont nécessaires qui évalueront les effets de l'exercice sur la composition corporelle, le fonctionnement musculaire, l'activité quotidienne, le fonctionnement psychologique ou une combinaison de ceux-ci. En outre, les résultats actuels ne fournissent pas suffisamment d'éléments probants pour identifier le programme optimal d'exercice physique pour les enfants atteints de cancer, et ils ne fournissent pas non plus d'informations sur les caractéristiques des personnes susceptibles ou non de tirer bénéfice d'un tel programme. Ces questions importantes doivent encore être clarifiées.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.