Intervention Review

Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens versus extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with posterior chamber intraocular lens for age-related cataract

  1. Samantha R de Silva1,
  2. Yasmin Riaz1,
  3. Jennifer R Evans2,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 29 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008812.pub2


How to Cite

de Silva SR, Riaz Y, Evans JR. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens versus extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with posterior chamber intraocular lens for age-related cataract. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008812. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008812.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Oxford Eye Hospital, Oxford, UK

  2. 2

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group, ICEH, London, UK

*Jennifer R Evans, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group, ICEH, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK. jennifer.evans@lshtm.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 29 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Age-related cataract is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Therefore, it is important to establish the most effective surgical technique for cataract surgery.

Objectives

The aim of this review is to examine the effects of two types of cataract surgery for age-related cataract: phacoemulsification and extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE).

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to May 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to May 2013), Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (January 1970 to May 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 13 May 2013.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials of phacoemulsification compared to ECCE for age-related cataract.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently selected and assessed all studies. We defined two primary outcomes: 'good functional vision' (presenting visual acuity of 6/12 or better) and 'poor visual outcome' (best corrected visual acuity of less than 6/60) at three and 12 months after surgery. We also collected data on intra and postoperative complications, and the cost of the procedures.

Main results

We included 11 trials in this review with a total of 1228 participants, ranging from age 45 to 94. The studies were generally at unclear risk of bias due to poorly reported trial methods. No study reported presenting visual acuity, so we report both uncorrected (UCVA) and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Studies varied in visual acuity assessment methods and time frames at which outcomes were reported. Participants in the phacoemulsification group were more likely to achieve UCVA of 6/12 or more at three months (risk ratio (RR) 1.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36 to 2.41, two studies, 492 participants) and one year (RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.73, one study, 439 participants). People in the phacoemulsification group were also more likely to achieve BCVA of 6/12 or more at three months (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.22, four studies, 645 participants) and one year (RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.14, one study, 439 participants), but the difference between the two groups was smaller. No trials reported BCVA less than 6/60 but three trials reported BCVA worse than 6/9 and 6/18: there were fewer events of this outcome in the phacoemulsification group than the ECCE group at both the three-month (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.55, three studies, 604 participants) and 12-month time points (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.05, one study, 439 participants). Three trials reported posterior capsule rupture: this occurred more commonly in the ECCE group than the phacoemulsification group but small numbers of events mean the true effect is uncertain (Peto odds ratio (OR) 0.56, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.22, three studies, 688 participants). Iris prolapse, cystoid macular oedema and posterior capsular opacification were also higher in the ECCE group than the phacoemulsification group. Phacoemulsification surgical costs were higher than ECCE in two studies. A third study reported similar costs for phacoemulsification and ECCE up to six weeks postoperatively, but following this time point ECCE incurred additional costs due to additional visits, spectacles and laser treatment to achieve a similar outcome.

Authors' conclusions

Removing cataract by phacoemulsification may result in a better visual acuity compared to ECCE, with a lower complication rate. The review is currently underpowered to detect differences for rarer outcomes, including poor visual outcome. The lower cost of ECCE may justify its use in a patient population where high-volume surgery is a priority, however, there are a lack of data comparing phacoemulsification and ECCE in lower-income settings.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparing two different techniques of removing cataracts

Cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye and is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. The only method of treatment for this condition is surgery to remove the opacified lens and to replace it with a new lens, usually made of plastic. There are various surgical techniques for removing the lens, and in this review we compare two of them: phacoemulsification and extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE).

A search was performed of the literature in May 2013 for studies comparing the two techniques and 11 randomised controlled trials were identified which included a total of 1228 participants. These trials included participants with age-related cataract and were conducted in Europe, South America and the Far East. We evaluated these for any biases that may have affected the data, extracted data according to pre-determined criteria and performed analyses of the pooled data from all studies where possible.

There were few studies that reported outcomes which met our pre-defined criteria. The studies were generally at unclear risk of bias due to poorly reported trial methods and the overall quality of the evidence for different outcomes ranged from moderate to very low. Phacoemulsification gave superior results at both three and 12-month time points. Complications were higher in the ECCE group than the phacoemulsification group. However, two out of three studies that reported costs indicated that ECCE was cheaper than phacoemulsification.

In summary, on the basis of the few studies that reported outcomes that we could include in our analysis, visual outcomes were better with phacoemulsification and complications were lower with this technique. However, ECCE was cheaper and in lower income countries ECCE may therefore have a role in maximising the number of people that can be treated with limited resources.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La phacoémulsification avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure par rapport à l'extraction extracapsulaire de la cataracte (EEC) avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure, pour la cataracte liée à l'âge

Contexte

La cataracte liée à l'âge est l'une des principales causes de cécité dans le monde. Par conséquent, il est important de déterminer la technique chirurgicale la plus efficace pour la chirurgie de la cataracte.

Objectifs

L'objectif de cette revue est d'examiner les effets des deux types de la chirurgie de la cataracte pour la cataracte liée à l'âge : la phacoémulsification et l'extraction extracapsulaire de la cataracte (EEC).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (qui contient le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'œil et la vision) (La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 4), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE en cours et autres citations non-indexées, Ovid MEDLINE quotidien, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (de janvier 1946 à mai 2013), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à mai 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature sur (LILACS) (de janvier 1982 à mai 2013), Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (de janvier 1970 à mai 2013), le méta-registre des essais contrôlés (mREC) (www.controlled-trials.com),), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) et WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). Nous n'avons appliqué aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date dans les recherches électroniques d'essais. Nous avons effectué les dernières recherches dans les bases de données électroniques le 13 mai 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés de la phacoémulsification par rapport à l'EEC pour la cataracte liée à l'âge.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné et évalué toutes les études. Nous avons défini deux critères de jugement principaux : « bonne vision fonctionnelle » (présentant l'acuité visuelle de 6/12 ou plus) et le «résultat visuel médiocre » (la meilleure acuité visuelle corrigée de moins de 6/60), 3 mois et 12 mois après la chirurgie. Nous avons également recueilli les données sur les complications intra et postopératoires et sur le coût des procédures.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 11 essais dans cette revue, avec un total de 1 228 participants, âgés de 45 à 94 ans. Les études étaient généralement à risque de biais incertain dû à des méthodes d'essais mal rapportées. Aucune étude ne rapportait présenter d'acuité visuelle, de sorte que nous avons rapporté les deux acuités visuelles non corrigées (AVNC) et la meilleure acuité visuelle corrigée (MAVC). Les études variaient au niveau des méthodes d'évaluation de l'acuité visuelle et des périodes auxquelles les critères de jugement étaient rapportés. Les participants dans le groupe de la phacoémulsification étaient plus susceptibles d'atteindre une AVNC de 6/12 ou plus à 3 mois (risque relatif (RR) 1,81, intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) de 1,36 à 2,41, deux études, 492 participants) et à un an (RR 1,99, IC à 95 % 1,45 à 2,73, une étude, 439 participants). Les personnes dans le groupe de la phacoémulsification étaient également plus susceptibles d'atteindre une MAVC de 6/12 ou plus à trois mois (RR 1,12, IC à 95 % 1,03 à 1,22, quatre études, 645 participants) et à un an (RR 1,06, IC à 95 % 0,99 à 1,14, une étude, 439 participants), mais la différence entre les deux groupes était plus petite. Aucun essai ne rapportait de MAVC inférieure à 6/60, mais trois essais rapportaient une MAVC inférieure à 6/9 et 6/18 : Il y avait moins d'effets sur ce critère de jugement dans le groupe de la phacoémulsification que dans le groupe d'EEC à la fois à trois mois (RR 0,33, IC à 95 % 0,20 à 0,55, trois études, 604 participants) et à 12 mois (RR 0,62, IC à 95 % 0,36 à 1,05, une étude, 439 participants). Trois essais rapportaient une rupture de la capsule postérieure : cela se produisait plus fréquemment dans le groupe d'EEC, comparé au groupe de la phacoémulsification, cependant le nombre réduit d'évènements signifie que l'effet réel est incertain (rapport des cotes de Peto (RC) 0,56, IC à 95 % 0,26 à 1,22, trois études, 688 participants). Le prolapsus de l'iris, l'Sdème maculaire cystoïde et l'opacification capsulaire postérieure étaient également plus élevés dans le groupe d'EEC que dans le groupe de la phacoémulsification. Dans deux études, les coûts de la phacoémulsification chirurgicale étaient plus élevés que l'EEC. Une troisième étude rapportait des coûts similaires pour la phacoémulsification et l'EEC jusqu'à six semaines après l'opération, mais par la suite, l'EEC encourait des coûts supplémentaires suite aux visites supplémentaires, aux lunettes de vue et au traitement au laser pour obtenir un résultat similaire.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'élimination de la cataracte par phacoémulsification peut entraîner une meilleure acuité visuelle par rapport à l'EEC, avec un faible taux de complications. La revue n'est actuellement pas en mesure de détecter des différences au niveau des critères de jugement plus rares, incluant le résultat visuel faible. Le coût inférieur de l'EEC pourrait justifier son utilisation chez les populations de patients où la chirurgie à volume élevée est une priorité. Cependant, il existe un manque de données comparant la phacoémulsification et l'EEC dans des contextes de faibles revenus.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La phacoémulsification avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure par rapport à l'extraction extracapsulaire de la cataracte (EEC) avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure, pour la cataracte liée à l'âge

Comparaison de deux différentes techniques d'ablation de la cataracte

La cataracte est une opacification du cristallin de l'œil et est l'une des principales causes de cécité dans le monde. La seule méthode de traitement pour cette affection est la chirurgie pour retirer le cristallin opacifié et le remplacer par un nouveau cristallin, généralement en plastique. Il existe différentes techniques chirurgicales pour retirer le cristallin et dans cette revue, nous avons comparé deux d'entre elles : la phacoémulsification et l'extraction extracapsulaire de la cataracte (EEC).

Une recherche a été effectuée dans la littérature en mai 2013 pour les études comparant les deux techniques et 11 essais contrôlés randomisés, qui incluaient un total de 1 228 participants, ont été identifiés. Ces essais incluaient des participants souffrants de cataracte liée à l'âge et ont été réalisés en Europe, en Amérique du Sud et en Extrême-Orient. Nous avons évalué les biais pouvant avoir affecté les données, extrait les données conformément aux critères prédéterminés et effectué des analyses des données combinées de toutes les études lorsque cela était possible.

Peu d'études rendaient compte de critères de jugement qui répondaient à nos critères prédéfinis. Les études étaient généralement à risque de biais incertain en raison de méthodes mal rapportées et la qualité globale des preuves pour les différents critères de jugement variait de modérée à très faible. La phacoémulsification apportait des résultats supérieurs à 3 mois et à 12 mois. Les complications étaient plus élevées dans le groupe d'EEC que dans le groupe de la phacoémulsification. Cependant, deux des trois études qui rapportaient les coûts ont indiqué que l'EEC était moins coûteuse que la phacoémulsification.

En résumé, sur la base des quelques études qui rendaient compte de critères de jugement et que nous avons pu inclure dans notre analyse, les critères de jugements visuels étaient meilleurs avec la phacoémulsification et les complications étaient inférieures avec cette technique. Cependant, l'EEC était moins coûteuse et dans les pays à faibles revenus, l'EEC pourrait donc jouer un rôle en maximisant le nombre de personnes qui peuvent être traitées avec des ressources limitées.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé