Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) with posterior chamber intraocular lens versus phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens for age-related cataract

  1. Yasmin Riaz1,
  2. Samantha R de Silva1,
  3. Jennifer R Evans2,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 10 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 23 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008813.pub2


How to Cite

Riaz Y, de Silva SR, Evans JR. Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) with posterior chamber intraocular lens versus phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens for age-related cataract. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD008813. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008813.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Oxford Eye Hospital, Oxford, UK

  2. 2

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group, ICEH, London, UK

*Jennifer R Evans, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group, ICEH, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK. jennifer.evans@lshtm.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 10 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Age-related cataract is a major cause of blindness and visual morbidity worldwide. It is therefore important to establish the optimal technique of lens removal in cataract surgery.

Objectives

To compare manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) and phacoemulsification techniques.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2013), Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (January 1970 to July 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 23 July 2013.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for age-related cataract that compared MSICS and phacoemulsification.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed all studies. We defined two primary outcomes: 'good functional vision' (presenting visual acuity of 6/12 or better) and 'poor visual outcome' (best corrected visual acuity of less than 6/60). We collected data on these outcomes at three and 12 months after surgery. Complications such as posterior capsule rupture rates and other intra- and postoperative complications were also assessed. In addition, we examined cost effectiveness of the two techniques. Where appropriate, we pooled data using a random-effects model.

Main results

We included eight trials in this review with a total of 1708 participants. Trials were conducted in India, Nepal and South Africa. Follow-up ranged from one day to six months, but most trials reported at six to eight weeks after surgery. Overall the trials were judged to be at risk of bias due to unclear reporting of masking and follow-up. No studies reported presenting visual acuity so data were collected on both best-corrected (BCVA) and uncorrected (UCVA) visual acuity. Most studies reported visual acuity of 6/18 or better (rather than 6/12 or better) so this was used as an indicator of good functional vision. Seven studies (1223 participants) reported BCVA of 6/18 or better at six to eight weeks (pooled risk ratio (RR) 0.99 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98 to 1.01) indicating no difference between the MSICS and phacoemulsification groups. Three studies (767 participants) reported UCVA of 6/18 or better at six to eight weeks, with a pooled RR indicating a more favourable outcome with phacoemulsification (0.90, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.96). One trial (96 participants) reported UCVA at six months with a RR of 1.07 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.26).

Regarding BCVA of less than 6/60: there were only 11/1223 events reported. The pooled Peto odds ratio was 2.48 indicating a more favourable outcome using phacoemulsification but with wide confidence intervals (0.74 to 8.28) which means that we are uncertain as to the true effect.

The number of complications reported were also low for both techniques. Again this means the review is underpowered to detect a difference between the two techniques with respect to these complications. One study reported on cost which was more than four times higher using phacoemulsification than MSICS.

Authors' conclusions

On the basis of this review, removing cataract by phacoemulsification may result in better UCVA in the short term (up to three months after surgery) compared to MSICS, but similar BCVA. There is a lack of data on long-term visual outcome. The review is currently underpowered to detect differences for rarer outcomes, including poor visual outcome. In view of the lower cost of MSICS, this may be a favourable technique in the patient populations examined in these studies, where high volume surgery is a priority. Further studies are required with longer-term follow-up to better assess visual outcomes and complications which may develop over time such as posterior capsule opacification.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparing two different techniques of removing cataracts

Cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye, which most commonly occurs due to increasing age. This can only be treated with an operation, and the aim of this review was to assess two different surgical methods. The first, called manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) involves using instruments to remove the lens from the eye through a small incision. The second, phacoemulsification, involves using a high frequency ultrasound probe to fragment the lens, and this machine also removes the lens fragments from the eye.

We searched the literature in July 2013 and identified eight randomised controlled trials that compared these two techniques. These included a total of 1708 participants randomly allocated to MSICS or phacoemulsification. The studies were carried out in India, Nepal and South Africa.

Not all studies reported the outcomes of visual acuity that we aimed to assess, making it difficult to draw definite conclusions. Better uncorrected visual acuity was seen in the short term with phacoemulsification; however, there were no differences in best-corrected visual acuity (i.e. after correction with spectacles). There appeared to be no significant difference regarding uncorrected visual acuity between the two techniques at six months in the one trial that reported at that time point. There was a lack of long-term data (one year or more after surgery). Very few participants were reported to have poor visual outcomes or complications (such as posterior capsule rupture) from the surgery. The cost of phacoemulsification was documented in one study only, and this was more than four times the cost of MSICS.

In this setting, the two techniques appear to be comparable in terms of visual acuity outcomes and complications. However further studies with a longer follow-up period are needed to better assess these outcomes.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparaison de la chirurgie de la cataracte par petite incision manuelle (CCPI manuelle) avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure et de la phacoémulsification avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure pour la cataracte liée à l’âge

Contexte

La cataracte liée à l’âge est la principale cause de cécité et de morbidité visuelle dans le monde. Il est donc important de déterminer la meilleure technique de retrait du cristallin en chirurgie de la cataracte.

Objectifs

Comparer les techniques de chirurgie de la cataracte par petite incision manuelle (CCPI manuelle) et de phacoémulsification.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (qui contient le Registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l’ophtalmologie) ( Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (de janvier 1946 à juillet 2013), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à juillet 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (de janvier 1982 à juillet 2013), Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (de janvier 1970 à juillet 2013), le Méta-registre des essais contrôlés (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) et la Plate-forme internationale des registres d’essais cliniques de l’OMS (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). Nous n’avons appliqué aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date dans les recherches électroniques d’essais. Nous avons effectué les dernières recherches dans les bases de données électroniques le 23 juillet 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) sur la cataracte liée à l’âge qui comparaient la CCPI manuelle et la phacoémulsification.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué indépendamment toutes les études. Nous avons défini deux critères de jugement principaux : « bonne vision fonctionnelle » (acuité visuelle de 6/12 ou plus) et « résultat visuel médiocre » (meilleure acuité visuelle corrigée inférieure à 6/60). Nous avons recueilli les donnés sur ces critères de jugement à trois mois et 12 mois après la chirurgie. Les complications telles que les taux de rupture de la capsule postérieure et autres complications per- et postopératoires ont également été évaluées. En outre, nous avons examiné la rentabilité des deux techniques. Lorsque cela était approprié, nous avons regroupé les données en utilisant un modèle à effets aléatoires.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus huit essais dans cette revue, avec un total de 1 708 participants. Les essais ont été réalisés en Inde, au Népal et en Afrique du Sud. La durée du suivi allait de un jour à six mois, mais la plupart des essais étaient rapportés au bout de six à huit semaines après la chirurgie. Dans l’ensemble, les essais étaient considérés à risque incertain de biais en raison du manque de clarté de la mise en aveugle et du suivi. Aucune étude ne rapportait de présentation de l’acuité visuelle, de sorte que les données ont été recueillies sur l’acuité visuelle à la fois corrigée (MAVC) et non corrigée (AVNC). La plupart des études rapportaient une acuité visuelle de 6/18 ou plus (plutôt que 6/12 ou plus), que nous avons donc utilisée comme indicateur d’une bonne vision fonctionnelle. Sept études (1 223 participants) rapportaient une MAVC de 6/18 ou plus à six-huit semaines (risque relatif (RR) groupé de 0,99, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 0,98 à 1,01), sans différence entre les groupes de CCPI manuelle et de phacoémulsification groupes. Trois études (767 participants) rapportaient une UCVA de 6/18 ou mieux au bout de six-huit semaines, avec un RR combiné indiquant des résultats plus favorables avec la phacoémulsification (0,90, IC à 95 % de 0,84 à 0,96). Un essai (96 participants) rapportait l’UCVA à six mois avec un RR de 1,07 (IC à 95 % de 0,91 à 1,26).

Concernant les MAVC inférieures à 6/60 : il n’y a eu que 11/1223 événements rapportés. Le rapport des cotes de Peto global était de 2,48, ce qui indique des résultats plus favorables avec la phacoémulsification, mais avec de larges intervalles de confiance (0,74 à 8,28), ce qui signifie que nous ne sommes pas certains de l’effet réel.

Le nombre de complications signalés étaient également faible pour les deux techniques. Ici encore, cela signifie que la revue n’est pas assez puissants pour déceler une différence entre les deux techniques en termes de complications. Une étude a rendu compte du coût, qui était plus de quatre fois plus élevé avec la phacoémulsification qu’avec la CCPI manuelle.

Conclusions des auteurs

Sur la base de cette revue, l’élimination de la cataracte par phacoémulsification peut donner une meilleure UCVA à court terme (jusqu’à trois mois après l’opération) par rapport à la CCPI manuelle, mais une MAVC similaire. On manque de données sur le résultat visuel à long terme. À l’heure actuelle, la revue n’est pas assez puissante pour déceler des différences dans les résultats plus rares, notamment les mauvais résultat visuels. Compte tenu du coût plus faible de la CCPI manuelle, cette technique pourrait être intéressante favorable dans les populations examinées dans ces études, où il faut en priorité opérer un grand nombre de patients. D’autres études sont nécessaires, avec un suivi à plus long terme afin de mieux évaluer les résultats sur la vision et les complications qui peuvent se développer au fil du temps, telles que l’opacification de la capsule postérieure.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparaison de la chirurgie de la cataracte par petite incision manuelle (CCPI manuelle) avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure et de la phacoémulsification avec lentille intraoculaire en chambre postérieure pour la cataracte liée à l’âge

Comparaison de deux différentes techniques d’ablation de la cataracte

La cataracte est une opacification du cristallin de l’œil, qui est le plus souvent due au vieillissement. Elle ne peut être traitée que par la chirurgie. L’objectif de cette revue était d’évaluer deux méthodes chirurgicales différentes. La première, appelée chirurgie de la cataracte par petite incision manuelle (CCPI manuelle), consiste à utiliser des instruments pour retirer le cristallin à travers une petite incision. La seconde, la phacoémulsification, consiste à fragmenter le cristallin à l’aide d’une sonde à ultrasons à haute fréquence ; cette machine enlève également les fragments de cristallin de l’œil.

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans la littérature en juillet 2013 et identifié huit essais contrôlés randomisés comparant ces deux techniques. Ces études portaient sur un total de 1 708 participants assignés à la CCPI manuelle ou à la phacoémulsification. Les études ont été réalisés en Inde, au Népal et en Afrique du Sud.

Les études ne rapportaient pas toutes les résultats d’acuité visuelle que nous cherchions à évaluer, ce qui rend difficile de tirer de conclusions définitives. Une meilleure acuité visuelle non corrigée était observée à court terme avec la phacoémulsification ; cependant, il n’y avait aucune différence en termes d’acuité visuelle corrigée (par ex. après correction avec des lunettes de vue). Il ne semble y avoir aucune différence significative concernant l’acuité visuelle non corrigée entre les deux techniques au bout de six mois dans le seul essai rapportant les résultats avec ce recul. Il manque des données à long terme (un an ou plus après la chirurgie). Le nombre rapporté de patients ayant obtenu de mauvais résultats visuels ou ayant eu des complications (telles que la rupture de la capsule postérieure) après la chirurgie est faible. Le coût de la phacoémulsification est documenté dans une seule étude ; il était plus de quatre fois supérieur à celui de la CCPI manuelle.

Dans ce contexte, les deux techniques semblent être comparable en termes de résultats d’acuité visuelle et de complications. Pour autant, des études avec des suivis plus longs sont nécessaires pour mieux évaluer ces critères de jugement.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 9th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�