Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Progestin-only contraceptives: effects on weight

  1. Laureen M Lopez1,*,
  2. Alison Edelman2,
  3. Mario Chen3,
  4. Conrad Otterness4,
  5. James Trussell5,
  6. Frans M Helmerhorst6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Fertility Regulation Group

Published Online: 2 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008815.pub3


How to Cite

Lopez LM, Edelman A, Chen M, Otterness C, Trussell J, Helmerhorst FM. Progestin-only contraceptives: effects on weight. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD008815. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008815.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    FHI 360, Clinical Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  2. 2

    Oregon Health & Science University, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Portland, Oregon, USA

  3. 3

    FHI 360, Division of Biostatistics, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  4. 4

    FHI 360, Program Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  5. 5

    Princeton University, Office of Population research, Princeton, New Jersey, USA

  6. 6

    Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Gynaecology, Division of Reproductive Medicine and Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden, Netherlands

*Laureen M Lopez, Clinical Sciences, FHI 360, P.O. Box 13950, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA. llopez@fhi360.org.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 2 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Progestin-only contraceptives (POCs) are appropriate for many women who cannot or should not take estrogen. Many POCs are long-acting, cost-effective methods of preventing pregnancy. However, concern about weight gain can deter the initiation of contraceptives and cause early discontinuation among users.

Objectives

The primary objective was to evaluate the association between progestin-only contraceptive use and changes in body weight.

Search methods

Through May 2013, we searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. The 2010 search also included EMBASE. For the initial review, we contacted investigators to identify other trials.

Selection criteria

All comparative studies were eligible that examined a POC versus another contraceptive method or no contraceptive. The primary outcome was mean change in body weight or mean change in body composition. We also considered the dichotomous outcome of loss or gain of a specified amount of weight.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors extracted the data. We computed the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous variables. For dichotomous outcomes, the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (OR) with 95% CI was calculated.

Main results

We found 16 studies; one examined progestin-only pills, one studied the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), four examined an implant, and 10 focused on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). Outcomes examined were changes in body weight only (14 studies), changes in both body weight and body composition (1 study), and changes in body composition only (1 study). We did not conduct meta-analysis due to the various contraceptive methods and weight change measures.

Comparison groups did not differ significantly for weight change in 12 studies. However, three studies showed weight change differences for POC users compared to women not using a hormonal method. In one study, weight gain (kg) was greater for the DMPA group than the group using a non-hormonal IUD in years one through three [(MD 2.28; 95% CI 1.79 to 2.77), (MD 2.71, 95% CI 2.12 to 3.30), and (MD 3.17; 95% CI 2.51 to 3.83), respectively]. The differences were notable within the normal weight and overweight subgroups. Two implant studies also showed differences in weight change. The implant group (six-capsule) had greater weight gain (kg) compared to the group using a non-hormonal IUD in both studies [(MD 0.47 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.65); (MD 1.10; 95% CI 0.36 to 1.84)]. In one of those studies, the implant group also had greater weight gain than a group using a barrier method or no contraceptive (MD 0.74; 95% CI 0.52 to 0.96).

The two studies that assessed body composition change showed differences between POC users and women not using a hormonal method. Adolescents using DMPA had a greater increase in body fat (%) compared to a group not using a hormonal method (MD 11.00; 95% CI 2.64 to 19.36). The DMPA group also had a greater decrease in lean body mass (%) (MD -4.00; 95% CI -6.93 to -1.07). The other study reported differences between an LNG-IUS group and a non-hormonal IUD group in percent change in body fat mass (2.5% versus -1.3%, respectively; reported P value = 0.029) and percent change in lean body mass (-1.4% versus 1.0%, respectively; reported P value = 0.027).

Authors' conclusions

The overall quality of evidence was moderate to low, given that the studies were evenly divided across the evidence quality groups (high, moderate, low, or very low quality). We found limited evidence of weight gain when using POCs. Mean gain was less than 2 kg for most studies up to 12 months. Weight change for the POC group generally did not differ significantly from that of the comparison group using another contraceptive. Two studies that assessed body composition showed that POC users had greater increases in body fat and decreases in lean body mass compared to users of non-hormonal methods. Appropriate counseling about typical weight gain may help reduce discontinuation of contraceptives due to perceptions of weight gain.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Effects of progestin-only birth control on weight

Progestin-only contraceptives (POCs) can be used by women who cannot or should not take the hormone estrogen. Many POCs are long acting, cost less than some other methods, and work well to prevent pregnancy. Some people worry that weight gain is a side effect of these birth control methods. Concern about weight gain can keep women from using these methods, or cause women to stop using them early, which can lead to unplanned pregnancy.  We looked at studies of POCs and changes in body weight.

Through May 2013, we did computer searches for studies of progestin-only birth control compared to another birth control method or no contraceptive. We also wrote to researchers to find other trials. The focus was on change in body weight.

We found 16 studies. Three showed differences in weight gain change for POC users compared to women who did not use hormonal birth control. In one study, the group using the injectable ‘depo’ gained more weight by one, two, and three years compared to a group using a non-hormonal IUD. The difference was noted among the normal weight and overweight women. Two studies showed an implant group (six-capsule) had more weight gain than the group using a non-hormonal IUD. In one study, the implant group also gained more weight than a group using a barrier method or no birth control.

Two studies showed differences in body mass change. In one, the depo group had a greater increase in body fat than a group with no hormonal birth control. The depo group also had a greater decrease in lean body mass than the no-hormonal group. The other study reported differences between users of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and those who used a non-hormonal IUD. The LNG-IUS group had an increase in body fat mass and a decrease in lean body mass

We found little evidence of weight gain when using POCs. Mean weight gain was less than 2 kg for most studies up to 12 months. The groups using other birth control methods had about the same weight gain. The two studies of body mass showed POC users had greater increases in body fat and decreases in lean mass than users of non-hormonal methods. Good counseling about typical weight gain may help women avoid stopping birth control early due to worries about weight gain.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Anticonceptivos con progesterona sola: efectos sobre el peso

Los anticonceptivos con progesterona sola (APS) son apropiados para muchas mujeres que no pueden o no deben tomar estrógeno. La mayoría de los APS son métodos de acción prolongada eficaces para la prevención del embarazo. Sin embargo, la preocupación con respecto al aumento de peso puede impedir el comienzo del uso de los anticonceptivos y provocar la interrupción temprana entre las usuarias.

Objetivos

El objetivo primario de la revisión fue evaluar la asociación entre el uso del anticonceptivo con progesterona sola y las variaciones en el peso corporal.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov e ICTRP y se estableció contacto con investigadores para identificar otros ensayos.

Criterios de selección

Fueron elegibles todos los estudios comparativos que examinaron un APS versus otro método o ningún anticonceptivo. La medida de resultado primaria fue la variación media en el peso corporal o la composición corporal.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores extrajeron los datos. Se calculó la diferencia de medias con el intervalo de confianza (IC) del 95% para las variables continuas y el odds ratio con el IC del 95% para las variables dicotómicas.

Resultados principales

No se realizó un metanálisis debido a los diferentes métodos anticonceptivos y medidas de variación en el peso. Quince estudios examinaron píldoras con progesterona sola (n = 1), Norplant (n = 4) y acetato de medroxiprogesterona de depósito (DMPA) (n = 10). Los grupos de comparación fueron similares para la variación en el peso en 11 estudios. Cuatro estudios mostraron diferencias en el peso o la variación en la composición corporal para los APS comparados con ningún método hormonal. Las adolescentes que utilizaron DMPA tuvieron un mayor aumento de la grasa corporal (%) versus un grupo sin un método hormonal (diferencia de medias 11,00; IC del 95%: 2,64 a 19,36). El grupo de DMPA también tuvo una mayor disminución de la masa corporal magra (%) (diferencia de medias −4,00; IC del 95%: −6,93 a −1,07). En otro estudio, el aumento de peso (kg) fue mayor en el grupo de DMPA que en un grupo de DIU (diferencia de medias 2,28; 2,71; 3,17, respectivamente). Las diferencias fueron notables dentro de los subgrupos con peso normal y con sobrepeso. Un estudio mostró que el grupo de Norplant (seis cápsulas) tuvo un mayor aumento de peso (kg) que un grupo de DIU no hormonal (diferencia de medias 0,47; IC del 95%: 0,29 a 0,65) y un grupo que utilizó un método no hormonal o ningún método (diferencia de medias 0,74; IC del 95%: 0,52 a 0,96). Otro estudio también mostró que un grupo de Norplant también tuvo un mayor aumento de peso (kg) que un grupo de DIU (diferencia de medias 1,10; IC del 95%: 0,36 a 1,84).

Conclusiones de los autores

Se encontraron pocas pruebas de aumento de peso cuando se utilizaron APS. El aumento de peso medio fue menor de 2 kg para la mayoría de los estudios hasta los 12 meses y generalmente similar en el grupo de comparación que utilizó otro anticonceptivo. El asesoramiento apropiado acerca del aumento de peso típico puede ayudar a reducir la interrupción de los anticonceptivos debido a las percepciones por el aumento de peso.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Contraceptifs progestatifs : effets sur le poids

Contexte

Les contraceptifs progestatifs (CP) conviennent à de nombreuses femmes qui ne peuvent ou ne doivent pas prendre d'œstrogènes. De nombreux CP ont une longue durée d’action et un bon rapport coût-efficacité pour la prévention des grossesses. Néanmoins, les inquiétudes liées à la prise de poids pourraient dissuader les femmes de prendre ces contraceptifs et entraîner un arrêt précoce du traitement.

Objectifs

Notre principal objectif était d'évaluer le lien entre la prise d'un contraceptif progestatif et le changement de poids corporel.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov et l'ICTRP, et avons contacté des investigateurs afin d'identifier des essais supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

Toutes les études comparant un CP à une autre méthode ou à l’absence de contraception étaient éligibles. Le critère d’évaluation principal était le changement moyen de poids ou de composition corporelle.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont extrait des données. Nous avons calculé la différence moyenne avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % pour les variables continues, et le rapport de cotes avec un IC à 95 % pour les variables dichotomiques.

Résultats Principaux

Nous n'avons pas effectué de méta-analyse en raison de la diversité des méthodes contraceptives et des mesures du changement de poids utilisées. Quinze études examinaient des pilules progestatives (N = 1), un implant Norplant (N = 4) et de l'acétate de médroxyprogestérone retard (AMPR) (N = 10). Les groupes comparés présentaient un changement de poids similaire dans 11 études. Dans quatre études, des différences étaient observées entre les CP et l'absence de contraception hormonale en termes de changement de poids ou de composition corporelle. Les adolescentes prenant de l'AMPR présentaient une plus forte augmentation de la masse adipeuse (%) qu’un groupe n'utilisant pas de méthode hormonale (différence moyenne de 11,00 ; IC à 95% entre 2,64 et 19,36). Le groupe AMPR présentait également une diminution supérieure de la masse maigre (%) (différence moyenne de -4,00 ; IC à 95% entre -6,93 et -1,07). Dans une autre étude, la prise de poids (kg) était plus forte dans le groupe AMPR que dans le groupe DIU (différence moyenne de 2,28, 2,71 à 3,17, respectivement). Ces différences étaient notables dans les groupes de poids normal et en surpoids. Une étude montrait que le groupe de l'implant Norplant (six capsules) présentait une prise de poids (kg) supérieure à celle d'un groupe utilisant un DIU non hormonal (différence moyenne de 0,47 (IC à 95 %, entre 0,29 et 0,65)) et d'un groupe utilisant une contraception non hormonale ou aucune contraception (différence moyenne de 0,74 ; IC à 95% entre 0,52 et 0,96). Une autre étude montrait qu'un groupe utilisant l'implant Norplant présentait également une prise de poids (kg) supérieure à celle d'un groupe utilisant un DIU (différence moyenne de 1,10 ; IC à 95% entre 0,36 et 1,84).

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous avons identifié peu de preuves de prise de poids associée aux CP. La prise de poids moyenne était inférieure à 2 kg dans la plupart des études jusqu'à 12 mois et était généralement similaire dans le groupe de comparaison utilisant un autre contraceptif. Des informations appropriées concernant la prise de poids habituelle pourraient permettre de réduire les abandons de la contraception liés à l’impression d'une prise de poids.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Contraceptifs progestatifs : effets sur le poids

Effets sur le poids des contraceptifs progestatifs

Les contraceptifs progestatifs (CP) peuvent être utilisés par les femmes qui ne peuvent ou ne doivent pas prendre d'œstrogènes. Beaucoup d’entre eux ont une longue durée d’action, sont moins coûteux que d'autres méthodes et sont efficaces pour prévenir les grossesses. Certaines personnes craignent que ces méthodes contraceptives ne provoquent une prise de poids. Ces inquiétudes quant à leur poids peuvent dissuader les femmes d'utiliser ces méthodes ou les pousser à les arrêter prématurément, ce qui peut entraîner une grossesse non désirée.Nous avons examiné les études évaluant la contraception progestative et le changement de poids corporel.

Nous avons effectué des recherches informatisées afin d'identifier des études comparant une contraception progestative à une autre méthode contraceptive ou à l’absence de contraception. Nous avons également écrit à des chercheurs afin de trouver d'autres essais. Le changement de poids corporel était le principal objet de la revue.

Quatre études sur 15 rapportaient des différences entre les groupes en termes de prise de poids ou de masse corporelle. Des différences ont été observées lorsqu'un CP était comparé à l’absence de contraception hormonale. Dans une étude, le groupe utilisant le contraceptif injectable Dépo présentait une augmentation supérieure de la masse adipeuse à six mois par rapport à un groupe ne recevant pas de contraception hormonale. Le groupe Dépo présentait également une plus forte diminution de la masse maigre par rapport au groupe sans contraception hormonale. Dans une autre étude, le groupe Dépo a pris davantage de poids à un, deux et trois ans qu'un groupe utilisant un DIU. Cette différence était observée dans les sous-groupes des femmes de poids normal et en surpoids (mais pas chez les femmes obèses). Deux études montraient que la prise de poids à six mois et à un an était plus importante dans un groupe utilisant un implant Norplant que dans un autre groupe utilisant un DIU. Un groupe Norplant présentait également une prise de poids supérieure à six mois par rapport à un groupe utilisant une autre méthode non hormonale ou aucune contraception.

Nous avons identifié peu de preuves suggérant que la contraception progestative était associée à une prise de poids. La prise de poids moyenne était inférieure à 2 kg dans la plupart des études jusqu'à 12 mois. Les groupes utilisant d'autres méthodes contraceptives présentaient une prise de poids relativement similaire. De bonnes informations concernant la prise de poids habituelle pourraient aider les femmes à ne pas arrêter prématurément leur contraception parce qu’elles craignent de prendre du poids.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux