Intervention Review

Neuromodulators for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Bethan L Richards1,*,
  2. Samuel L Whittle2,
  3. Rachelle Buchbinder3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group

Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 SEP 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008921.pub2


How to Cite

Richards BL, Whittle SL, Buchbinder R. Neuromodulators for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008921. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008921.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Institute of Rheumatology and Orthopedics, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia

  2. 2

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Rheumatology Unit, Woodville, South Australia, Australia

  3. 3

    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Cabrini Hospital, Malvern, Victoria, Australia

*Bethan L Richards, Institute of Rheumatology and Orthopedics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, New South Wales, 2050, Australia. brichard@med.usyd.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Pain management is a high priority for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Despite deficiencies in research data, neuromodulators have gained widespread clinical acceptance as adjuvants in the management of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Objectives

The aim of this review was to determine the efficacy and safety of neuromodulators in pain management in patients with RA. Neuromodulators included in this review were anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin, phenytoin, sodium valproate, lamotrigine, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine and topiramate), ketamine, bupropion, methylphenidate, nefopam, capsaicin and the cannabinoids.

Search methods

We performed a computer-assisted search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, 4th quarter), MEDLINE (1950 to week 1 November 2010), EMBASE (Week 44, 2010) and PsycINFO (1806 to week 2 November 2010). We also searched the 2008 and 2009 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) conference abstracts and performed a handsearch of reference lists of articles.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials which compared any neuromodulator to another therapy (active or placebo, including non-pharmacological therapies) in adult patients with RA that had at least one clinically relevant outcome measure.

Data collection and analysis

Two blinded review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the trials. Meta-analyses were used to examine the efficacy of a neuromodulator on pain, depression and function as well as their safety.

Main results

Four trials with high risk of bias were included in this review. Two trials evaluated oral nefopam (52 participants) and one trial each evaluated topical capsaicin (31 participants) and oromucosal cannabis (58 participants).

The pooled analyses identified a significant reduction in pain levels favouring nefopam over placebo (weighted mean difference (WMD) -21.16, 95% CI -35.61 to -6.71; number needed to treat (NNT) 2, 95% CI 1.4 to 9.5) after two weeks. There were insufficient data to assess withdrawals due to adverse events. Nefopam was associated with significantly more adverse events (RR 4.11, 95% CI 1.58 to 10.69; NNTH 9, 95% CI 2 to 367), which were predominantly nausea and sweating.

In a mixed population trial, qualitative analysis of patients with RA showed a significantly greater reduction in pain favouring topical capsaicin over placebo at one and two weeks (MD -23.80, 95% CI -44.81 to -2.79; NNT 3, 95% CI 2 to 47; MD -34.40, 95% CI -54.66 to -14.14; NNT 2, 95% CI 1.4 to 6 respectively). No separate safety data were available for patients with RA, however 44% of patients developed burning at the site of application and 2% withdrew because of this.

One small, low quality trial assessed oromucosal cannabis against placebo and found a small, significant difference favouring cannabis in the verbal rating score 'pain at present' (MD -0.72, 95% CI -1.31 to -0.13) after five weeks. Patients receiving cannabis were significantly more likely to suffer an adverse event (risk ratio (RR) 1.82, 95% CI 1.10 to 3.00; NNTH 3, 95% CI 3 to 13). These were most commonly dizziness (26%), dry mouth (13%) and light headedness (10%).

Authors' conclusions

There is currently weak evidence that oral nefopam, topical capsaicin and oromucosal cannabis are all superior to placebo in reducing pain in patients with RA. However, each agent is associated with a significant side effect profile. The confidence in our estimates is not strong given the difficulties with blinding, the small numbers of participants evaluated and the lack of adverse event data. In some patients, however, even a small degree of pain relief may be considered worthwhile. Until further research is available, given the relatively mild nature of the adverse events, capsaicin could be considered as an add-on therapy for patients with persistent local pain and inadequate response or intolerance to other treatments. Oral nefopam and oromucosal cannabis have more significant side effect profiles however and the potential harms seem to outweigh any modest benefit achieved.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Neuromodulators for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of neuromodulators on pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

The review shows that in people with rheumatoid arthritis

- Nefopam, topical capsaicin and oromucosal cannabis may improve pain levels

- Oromucosal cannabis may slightly improve sleep

- No trials were found that evaluated whether neuromodulators affect functional status, quality of life, withdrawals due to inadequate analgesia or depression

We also do not have precise information about serious side effects and complications. Possible side effects of nefopam that were found in the trials include nausea, dry mouth, sweating and feeling tired. However, rare complications have also been reported and include convulsions and cardiac arrhythmias.

Common side effects of topical capsaicin therapy include local skin irritation and burning. More serious allergic reactions are rare but have been reported.

Possible side effects of oromucosal cannabis found in this review were dizziness, fatigue and loss of balance. Readers should be aware that, although not seen in our review, rarer complications including psychosis and suicidal thoughts have also been reported.

What is rheumatoid arthritis and what are neuromodulators?

When you have rheumatoid arthritis your immune system, which normally fights infection, attacks the lining of your joints. This makes your joints swollen, stiff and painful. The small joints of your hands and feet are usually affected first. There is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis at present, so the treatments aim to relieve pain and stiffness and improve your ability to move.

Neuromodulators are broadly defined as substances which alter the way nerves communicate with each other and, consequently, the overall activity level of the brain. By acting on these nerve signals it is thought that these drugs can reduce the amount of pain felt by an individual. Neuromodulators sometimes used in pain management include the anticonvulsant agents (drugs used to prevent seizures); oral, intramuscular or intravenous ketamine; oral or intravenous nefopam; topical capsaicin, cannabis based medications (oral, oromucosal or inhaled); and more recently intra-articular botulinum toxin.

Best estimate of what happens to people with rheumatoid arthritis who take neuromodulators

Oral nefopam

Pain (higher scores mean worse or more severe pain)

- People who took nefopam rated their pain 21 points lower on a scale of 0 to 100 after 2 weeks treatment with nefopam (21% absolute improvement)

- People who took nefopam rated their pain as 18 on a scale of 0 to 100 after 2 weeks

- People who took a placebo rated their pain as 39 on a scale of 0 to 100

Total adverse events

- 27 more people out of 100 experienced an adverse event after 4 weeks treatment with nefopam (absolute difference 27%). These were predominantly nausea (56%), sweating (44%), insomnia (11%), pruritus (11%) and malaise (11%). They completely settled once treatment was ceased

- 35 out of 100 people who took nefopam suffered an adverse event

- 8 out of 100 people who took a placebo suffered an adverse event

Topical capsaicin

Pain (higher scores mean worse or more severe pain)

- People who took capsaicin rated their pain 34 points lower on a scale of 0 to 100 after 2 weeks treatment (34% absolute improvement)

- People who took capsaicin rated their pain as 14 on a scale of 0 to 100 after 2 weeks

- People who took a placebo rated their pain as 48 on a scale of 0 to 100

Adverse events

No data

Oromucosal cannabis

Pain (higher scores mean worse or more severe pain)

- People who took oromucosal cannabis rated their pain 0.7 points lower on a scale of 0 to 5 after 5 weeks treatment

- People who took oromucosal cannabis rated their pain as 2.6 on a scale of 0 to 5 after 5 weeks

- People who took a placebo rated their pain as 3.3 on a scale of 0 to 5

Quality of sleep

- People who received oromucosal cannabis rated their sleep 1.2 points better on a scale of 0 to 10 after 5 weeks treatment (12% absolute improvement)

- People who received oromucosal cannabis rated their sleep as 4.6 on a scale of 0 to 10 after 5 weeks

- People who received a placebo rated their sleep as 3.4 on a scale of 0 to 10

Total adverse events

- 27 more people out of 100 experienced an adverse event after 4 weeks treatment with oromucosal cannabis (absolute difference 27%). These were most commonly dizziness (26%), light headedness (10%), dry mouth (13%), nausea (6%) and falls (6%); they completely resolved once treatment was ceased

- 35 out of 100 people who took oromucosal cannabis suffered an adverse event

- 8 out of 100 people who took a placebo suffered an adverse event

We looked at all the published scientific literature and identified four drug trials that evaluated different neuromodulators. Two small studies with a total of 52 patients tested the drug nefopam (which is only available in some parts of the world). One trial each tested capsaicin cream (31 participants) and a cannabis based mouth spray (58 participants). Note: use of medicinal cannabis is illegal and therefore unavailable in most countries.

When patients took nefopam they had a greater improvement in pain levels, on average 21 points on a 100 point scale, than those patients who were given a placebo (an inactive substance that has no treatment value). However, patients on nefopam also developed side effects, which mainly consisted of nausea and sweating. Many patients stopped taking the drug because the symptoms were so bad. These studies were performed in the 1980s when treatment for RA was very different to what it is now. Until further, larger studies are carried out to better assess nefopam, with many other effective pain relieving medications on the market, the risks of harm seem to outweigh the benefit arguing against its routine use.

In the one small study testing capsaicin cream (0.025%) in patients with persistent knee pain, patients also had better pain relief with capsaicin cream than for those given a placebo cream. On average, patients receiving the active treatment improved by 34 more points (out of 100) than the control group. The most common side effect was a local burning sensation at the site that the cream was applied. This was usually mild but was moderate to severe in a few patients. About 50% of patients who use capsaicin cream on their skin will develop this local burning but only 2 in 100 will stop treatment because of this.

The one small study of the cannabis based mouth spray Setivax also showed reduced pain levels in patients, to a small extent. Pain was measured on a 0 to 5 point scale and there was an improvement in patients receiving Setivax of 0.74 points. About one in every three patients taking this medication developed a side effect, which was commonly dizziness (26%), dry mouth (13%) or light headedness (10%). Although this is only one study, weighing up these side effects and the minimal benefit on pain levels, until further trials are carried out we cannot recommend the use of this medication.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Neuromodulateurs pour la gestion de la douleur de l'arthrite rhumatoïde

Contexte

Pour les patients souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde (AR), la gestion de la douleur est de la plus haute importance. Malgré des lacunes dans les données de la recherche, les neuromodulateurs sont aujourd'hui largement utilisés comme adjuvants dans la gestion des patients souffrant de douleur musculo-squelettique chronique.

Objectifs

L’objectif de cette revue était de déterminer l’efficacité et l’innocuité des neuromodulateurs pour la gestion de la douleur chez les patients souffrant d’AR. Les neuromodulateurs inclus dans cette revue étaient les anticonvulsivants (gabapentine, prégabaline, phénytoïne, valproate de sodium, lamotrigine, carbamazépine, lévétiracétam, loxcarbazépine, tiagabine et topiramate), la kétamine, le bupropion, le méthylphénidate, le néfopam, la capsaïcine et les cannabinoïdes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches assistées par ordinateur dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library , 4ème trimestre), MEDLINE (de 1950 jusqu'à la 1ère semaine de novembre 2010), EMBASE (44ème semaine 2010) et PsycINFO (de 1806 jusqu'à la 2ème semaine de novembre 2010). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les actes des conférences organisées en 2008 et 2009 par l’American College of Rheumatology (ACR) et par la Ligue européenne contre le rhumatisme (EULAR), ainsi que des recherches manuelles dans les bibliographies d’articles.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant un quelconque neuromodulateur à un autre traitement (actif ou placebo, y compris thérapies non pharmacologiques) chez des patients adultes souffrant d’AR, dans la mesure où ils effectuaient au moins une mesure de résultat cliniquement pertinente.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les deux auteurs de cette revue, qui ont été masqués, ont extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais dans les essais de manière indépendante. Des méta-analyses ont été utilisées afin d’examiner l’efficacité des neuromodulateurs sur la douleur, la dépression et l’état fonctionnel, ainsi que leur innocuité.

Résultats Principaux

Quatre essais à risque élevé de biais ont été inclus dans cette revue. Deux essais avaient évalué le néfopam oral (52 participants), un essai avait évalué la capsaïcine topique (31 participants) et un autre le cannabis oromucosal (58 participants).

Les analyses regroupées ont identifié un niveau significativement moindre de douleur avec le néfopam par rapport au placebo (différence moyenne pondérée (DMP) -21,16 / IC à 95 % -35,61 à -6,71 ; nombre nécessaire à traiter (NNT) 2 / IC à 95 % 1,4 à 9,5) après deux semaines. Les données étaient insuffisantes pour évaluer les retraits dus à des effets indésirables. Le néfopam était associé à significativement plus d'événements indésirables (RR 4,11 / IC à 95 % 1,58 à 10,69 ; NNN 9 / IC à 95 % 2 à 367) qui étaient principalement des nausées et des sueurs.

Dans un essai sur une population mixte, l'analyse qualitative des patients atteints d'AR a montré une réduction significativement plus importante de la douleur avec la capsaïcine topique qu'avec le placebo après une et deux semaines (DM -23,80 / IC à 95 % -44,81 à -2,79 ; NNT 3 / IC à 95 % 2 à 47 ; et DM -34,40 / IC à 95 % -54,66 à -14,14 ; NNT 2 / IC à 95 % 1,4 à 6, respectivement). Les données d'innocuité n'étaient pas disponibles de manière séparée pour les patients atteints d'AR, mais 44 % des patients avaient développé une brûlure à l'endroit de l'application et 2 % avaient abandonné pour cette raison.

Un petit essai de faible qualité avait évalué le cannabis oromucosal par rapport à une placebo et avait trouvé une petite différence significative en faveur du cannabis au niveau de la note verbale de 'douleur à l'instant présent' (DM -0,72 / IC à 95 % -1,31 à -0,13) après cinq semaines. Les patients recevant du cannabis étaient significativement plus susceptibles de souffrir d'un événement indésirable (risque relatif (RR) 1,82 / IC à 95 % 1,10 à 3,00 ; NNN 3 / IC à 95 % 3 à 13). Il s'agissait le plus souvent de vertiges (26 %), de sécheresse buccale (13 %) et d'étourdissements (10 %).

Conclusions des auteurs

Il y a actuellement de vagues preuves que le néfopam en prise orale, la capsaïcine topique et le cannabis oromucosal sont tous supérieurs au placebo dans la réduction de la douleur chez les patients atteints d'AR. Cependant, chaque agent est associé à un important profil d'effets secondaires. Nos estimations ne méritent pas une trop forte confiance, compte tenu des difficultés avec la mise en aveugle, des petits nombres de participants étudiés et du manque de données sur les effets indésirables. Chez certains patients cependant, même un léger soulagement de la douleur peut être considéré comme important. Jusqu'à ce que des recherches supplémentaires soient disponibles, étant donnée la nature relativement bénigne des effets indésirables, la capsaïcine peut être considérée comme une thérapie d'appoint pour les patients souffrant de douleurs locales persistantes et répondant de manière inadéquate ou ne supportant pas les autres traitements. Le néfopam en prise orale et le cannabis oromucosal ont des profils d'effets secondaires plus importants et les préjudices potentiels semblent l'emporter sur tout bénéfice léger pouvant être obtenu.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Neuromodulateurs pour la gestion de la douleur de l'arthrite rhumatoïde

Neuromodulateurs pour la gestion de la douleur de l'arthrite rhumatoïde

Ce résumé d’une revue Cochrane présente les connaissances tirées de nos recherches portant sur les effets des neuromodulateurs sur la douleur chez les patients souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde.

Cette revue démontre que chez les patients souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde :

- Le néfopam, la capsaïcine topique et le cannabis oromucosal peuvent alléger les douleurs

- Le cannabis oromucosal peut légèrement améliorer le sommeil

- Aucun essai n'a été trouvé qui ait évalué si les neuromodulateurs ont une incidence sur le statut fonctionnel, la qualité de vie, les retraits pour analgésie insuffisante ou la dépression

Nous ne disposons pas non plus d'informations précises sur les effets secondaires graves et les complications. Les effets secondaires possibles du néfopam constatés dans ces essais comprennent la nausée, la sécheresse buccale, la transpiration et la sensation de fatigue. Toutefois, des complications rares ont également été signalées, telles que convulsions et arythmies cardiaques.

Les effets secondaires courants de la thérapie par capsaïcine topique incluent les irritations cutanées locales et les brulures. Des réactions allergiques plus graves sont rares mais ont été signalées.

Les effets secondaires possibles du cannabis oromucosal rencontrés dans cette revue étaient les étourdissements, la fatigue et la perte d'équilibre. Les lecteurs doivent être conscients que, bien que cela n'ait pas été rencontré dans notre revue, des complications rares ont également été signalées, dont la psychose et les pensées suicidaires.

Qu’est-ce que l’arthrite rhumatoïde et que sont les neuromodulateurs ?

Lorsque vous souffrez d’une arthrite rhumatoïde, votre système immunitaire, qui combat normalement les infections, attaque la paroi de vos articulations. Cela fait gonfler vos articulations et les rend raides et douloureuses. Les petites articulations de vos mains et de vos pieds sont généralement les premières touchées. Il n’existe à l’heure actuelle aucun remède pour l’arthrite rhumatoïde et les traitements visent donc à soulager la douleur et la raideur, ainsi qu’à améliorer votre capacité à vous déplacer.

Les neuromodulateurs sont globalement définis comme des substances qui modifient la façon dont les nerfs communiquent entre eux et donc le niveau global d'activité du cerveau. En agissant sur ces signaux nerveux, on pense que ces médicaments peuvent réduire la douleur ressentie par la personne. Parmi les neuromodulateurs parfois utilisés dans la gestion de la douleur on compte les anticonvulsivants (des médicaments utilisés pour prévenir les crises convulsives), la kétamine (par voie orale, intramusculaire ou intraveineuse), le néfopam (par voie orale ou intraveineuse), la capsaïcine topique, les médicaments à base de cannabis (par voie orale, oromucosale ou inhalation) et, plus récemment, la toxine botulinique intra-articulaire.

Meilleure estimation de ce qui arrive aux personnes souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde et qui prennent des neuromodulateurs

Néfopam par voie orale

Douleur (des scores plus élevés signifient une douleur plus pénible ou plus forte)

- Les gens ayant pris du néfopam ont attribué à leur douleur une note plus basse de 21 points, sur une échelle de 0 à 100, après 2 semaines de traitement par néfopam (21% d'amélioration absolue)

- Les gens ayant pris du néfopam ont attribué après 2 semaines une note de 18 à leur douleur, sur une échelle de 0 à 100

- Les personnes ayant pris un placebo ont attribué une note de 39 à leur douleur, sur une échelle de 0 à 100

Nombre total d'effets secondaires

- 27 personnes de plus sur 100 ont subi un événement indésirable après 4 semaines de traitement par néfopam (différence absolue de 27 %). Il s'agissait principalement de nausées (56 %), de transpiration (44 %), d'insomnie (11 %), de prurit (11 %) et de malaise (11 %). Ils ont complètement disparu une fois le traitement cessé

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris du néfopam, 35 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris un placebo, 8 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable.

Capsaïcine topique

Douleur (des scores plus élevés signifient une douleur plus pénible ou plus forte)

- Les gens ayant pris de la capsaïcine ont attribué à leur douleur une note plus basse de 34 points, sur une échelle de 0 à 100, après 2 semaines de traitement (34 % d'amélioration absolue)

- Les gens ayant pris de la capsaïcine ont attribué après 2 semaines une note de 14 à leur douleur, sur une échelle de 0 à 100

- Les personnes ayant pris un placebo ont attribué une note de 48 à leur douleur, sur une échelle de 0 à 100

Événements indésirables

Aucunes données

Cannabis oromucosal

Douleur (des scores plus élevés signifient une douleur plus pénible ou plus forte)

- Les gens ayant pris du cannabis oromucosal ont attribué à leur douleur une note plus basse de 0,7 points, sur une échelle de 0 à 5, après 5 semaines de traitement

- Les gens ayant pris du cannabis oromucosal ont attribué à leur douleur une note de 2,6 points, sur une échelle de 0 à 5, après 5 semaines de traitement

- Les personnes ayant pris un placebo ont attribué une note de 3,3 à leur douleur, sur une échelle de 0 à 5

Qualité du sommeil

- Les gens ayant pris du cannabis oromucosal ont attribué à leur sommeil une note améliorée de 1,2 points, sur une échelle de 0 à 10, après 5 semaines de traitement (12 % d'amélioration absolue)

- Les gens ayant reçu du cannabis oromucosal ont attribué à leur douleur une note de 4,6 points, sur une échelle de 0 à 10, après 5 semaines de traitement

- Les personnes ayant reçu un placebo ont attribué une note de 3,4 à leur douleur, sur une échelle de 0 à 10

Nombre total d'effets secondaires

- 27 personnes de plus sur 100 ont subi un événement indésirable après 4 semaines de traitement au cannabis oromucosal (différence absolue de 27 %). Il s'agissait le plus souvent de vertiges (26 %), d'étourdissements (10 %), de sécheresse buccale (13 %), de nausées (6 % ) et de chutes (6 %). Ils ont complètement disparu une fois le traitement arrêté

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris du cannabis oromucosal , 35 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris un placebo, 8 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable.

Nous avons examiné toute la littérature scientifique publiée et nous avons identifié quatre essais médicamenteux ayant évalué différents neuromodulateurs. Deux petites études portant au total sur 52 patients avaient testé le néfopam (qui n'est disponible que dans certaines régions du monde). Un essai avait testé la crème de capsaïcine (31 participants) et un autre un spray buccal à base de cannabis (58 participants). Remarque : l'utilisation de cannabis médicinal est illégale, et on ne peut donc pas s'en procurer, dans la plupart des pays.

Les patients ayant pris du néfopam avaient bénéficié d'un plus grand allègement de la douleur, en moyenne 21 points sur une échelle de 100 points, que les patients qui avaient reçu un placebo (une substance inactive qui n'a pas de valeur thérapeutique). Cependant, les patients sous néfopam avaient également développé des effets secondaires, consistant principalement en nausées et sueurs. Beaucoup de patients avaient cessé de prendre le médicament tellement les symptômes étaient pénibles. Ces études avaient été réalisées dans les années 1980 lorsque le traitement de l'AR était très différent de ce qu'il est aujourd'hui. Jusqu'à ce que d'autres études plus vastes soient effectuées afin de mieux évaluer le néfopam, ainsi que de nombreux autres médicaments anti-douleur efficaces qui sont sur ​​le marché, les risques de préjudices semblent l'emporter sur les avantages, militant contre son utilisation régulière.

Dans une petite étude testant la crème de capsaïcine (0,025 %) chez des patients souffrant de douleurs persistantes au genou, les patients ont également bénéficié d'un meilleur soulagement de la douleur avec la crème de capsaïcine qu'avec la crème placebo. En moyenne, les patients recevant le traitement actif avaient bénéficié d'une amélioration de 34 points (sur 100) par rapport au groupe témoin. L'effet indésirable le plus fréquent était une sensation de brûlure locale là où la crème avait été appliquée. Cela était généralement léger, mais pouvait aussi être modéré à fort chez certains patients. Environ 50 % des patients qui utilisent la crème de capsaïcine sur leur peau développeront cette brûlure locale, mais seulement 2 sur 100 arrêteront le traitement pour cette raison.

La seule étude sur le spray buccal Sativex à base de cannabis a également constaté, dans une petite mesure, une moindre douleur chez les patients. La douleur avait été mesurée sur une échelle de 0 à 5 points et il y avait une amélioration de 0,74 points chez les patients recevant du Sativex. Environ un patient sur trois prenant ce médicament avait développé un effet secondaire, qui était souvent des vertiges (26 %), de la sécheresse buccale (13 %) ou des étourdissements (10 %). Bien qu'il ne s'agisse que d'une seule étude, si nous mettons en balance ces effets secondaires et le bénéfice minime sur la douleur nous ne pouvons pas recommander l'utilisation de ce médicament avant que d'autres essais soient effectués.

Notes de traduction

This translation refers to an older version of the review that has been updated or amended.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th April, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français