Intervention Review

Muscle relaxants for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Bethan L Richards1,*,
  2. Samuel L Whittle2,
  3. Rachelle Buchbinder3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group

Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 6 SEP 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008922.pub2


How to Cite

Richards BL, Whittle SL, Buchbinder R. Muscle relaxants for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008922. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008922.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Institute of Rheumatology and Orthopedics, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia

  2. 2

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Rheumatology Unit, Woodville, South Australia, Australia

  3. 3

    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Cabrini Hospital, Malvern, Victoria, Australia

*Bethan L Richards, Institute of Rheumatology and Orthopedics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, New South Wales, 2050, Australia. brichard@med.usyd.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Pain management is a high priority for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Muscle relaxants include drugs that reduce muscle spasm (for example benzodiazepines such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan) and non-benzodiazepines such as metaxalone (Skelaxin) or a combination of paracetamol and orphenadrine (Muscol)) and drugs that prevent increased muscle tone (baclofen and dantrolene). Despite a paucity of evidence supporting their use, antispasmodic and antispasticity muscle relaxants have gained widespread clinical acceptance as adjuvants in the management of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Objectives

The aim of this review was to determine the efficacy and safety of muscle relaxants in pain management in patients with RA. The muscle relaxants that were included in this review are the antispasmodic benzodiazepines (alprazolam, bromazepam, chlordiazepoxide,cinolazepam, clonazepam, cloxazolam, clorazepate, diazepam, estazolam, flunitrazepam, flurazepam, flutoprazepam, halazepam, ketazolam, loprazolam, lorazepam, lormetazepam, medazepam, midazolam, nimetazepam, nitrazepam, nordazepam, oxazepam, pinazepam, prazepam, quazepam, temazepam, tetrazepam, triazolam), antispasmodic non-benzodiazepines (cyclobenzaprine, carisoprodol, chlorzoxazone, meprobamate, methocarbamol, metaxalone, orphenadrine, tizanidine and zopiclone), and antispasticity drugs (baclofen and dantrolene sodium).

Search methods

We performed a search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 4th quarter 2010), MEDLINE (1950 to week 1 November 2010), EMBASE (Week 44 2010), and PsycINFO (1806 to week 2 November 2010). We also searched the 2008 to 2009 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) abstracts and performed a handsearch of reference lists of relevant articles.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials which compared a muscle relaxant to another therapy (active, including non-pharmacological therapies, or placebo) in adult patients with RA and that reported at least one clinically relevant outcome.

Data collection and analysis

Two blinded review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the trials. Meta-analyses were used to examine the efficacy of muscle relaxants on pain, depression, sleep and function, as well as their safety.

Main results

Six trials (126 participants) were included in this review. All trials were rated at high risk of bias. Five cross-over trials evaluated a benzodiazepine, four assessed diazepam (n = 71) and one assessed triazolam (n = 15). The sixth trial assessed zopiclone (a non-benzodiazepine) (n = 40) and was a parallel group study. No trial duration was longer than two weeks while three single dose trials assessed outcomes at 24 hours only. Overall the included trials failed to find evidence of a beneficial effect of muscle relaxants over placebo, alone (at 24 hrs, 1 or 2 weeks) or in addition to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (at 24 hrs), on pain intensity, function, or quality of life. Data from two trials of longer than 24 hours duration (n = 74) (diazepam and zopiclone) found that participants who received a muscle relaxant had significantly more adverse events compared with those who received placebo (number needed to harm (NNTH) 3, 95% CI 2 to 7). These were predominantly central nervous system side effects, including dizziness and drowsiness (NNTH 3, 95% CI 2 to 11). 

Authors' conclusions

Based upon the currently available evidence in patients with RA, benzodiazepines (diazepam and triazolam) do not appear to be beneficial in improving pain over 24 hours or one week. The non-benzodiazepine agent zopiclone also did not significantly reduce pain over two weeks. However, even short term muscle relaxant use (24 hours to 2 weeks) is associated with significant adverse events, predominantly drowsiness and dizziness.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Muscle relaxants for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of muscle relaxants on pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

The review shows that in people with rheumatoid arthritis:

- Muscle relaxants may not improve pain when taken as a single dose or for up to a two week period

- We are uncertain whether muscle relaxants affect functional status because of the very low quality of the evidence

- No trials were found that evaluated whether muscle relaxants affect quality of life

- No trials were found that evaluated whether antidepressants affect sleep

- We are uncertain whether muscle relaxants affect mood because of the very low quality of the evidence

We also do not have precise information about side effects and complications. This is particularly true for rare but serious side effects. Possible side effects may include feeling tired or nauseous, headaches, blurred vision, a dry mouth, sexual dysfunction, or becoming dizzy or constipated. Rare complications may include increased suicidal thinking, liver inflammation, or a reduced white cell count.

What is rheumatoid arthritis and what are muscle relaxants?

When you have rheumatoid arthritis your immune system, which normally fights infection, attacks the lining of your joints. This makes your joints swollen, stiff, and painful. The small joints of your hands and feet are usually affected first. There is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis at present, so the treatments aim to relieve pain and stiffness and improve your ability to move.

Muscle relaxants can be used to treat anxiety and promote sleep, and some people believe they may also reduce pain by acting on the nerves that cause pain, but this remains controversial. Muscle relaxants include drugs that reduce muscle spasm (for example benzodiazepines such as diazepam (Valium), Xanax, Ativan and non-benzodiazepines such as Skelaxin, Muscol) and drugs that prevent increased muscle tone (baclofen and dantrolene).

Best estimates of what happens to people with rheumatoid arthritis who take muscle relaxants:

Pain at 24 hours:

- Non-significant result.

Pain at 1 to 2 weeks:

- Non-significant result.

Withdrawal due to adverse events, after 2 weeks:

- Non-significant result.

Total adverse events:

- 49 more people out of 100 experienced an adverse event, after 1 to 2 weeks, when they took a muscle relaxant (absolute difference 49%),

- 52 out of 100 people who took a muscle relaxant suffered an adverse event,

- 3 out of 100 people who took a placebo suffered an adverse event.

Central nervous system (CNS) adverse events:

- 33 more people out of 100 experienced a CNS adverse event, after 1 to 2 weeks, when they took a muscle relaxant (absolute difference 33%),

- 39 out of 100 people who took a muscle relaxant suffered a CNS adverse event,

- 6 out of 100 people who took a placebo relaxant suffered a CNS adverse event.

This record should be cited as:

This is a Cochrane review abstract and plain language summary, prepared and maintained by The Cochrane Collaboration, currently published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews [Issue and date] © [year] The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.. The full text of the review is available in The Cochrane Library (ISSN 1464-780X).

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Myorelaxants pour la gestion de la douleur de l'arthrite rhumatoïde

Contexte

Pour les patients souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde (AR), la gestion de la douleur est de la plus haute importance. Les myorelaxants englobent des médicaments qui réduisent les spasmes musculaires (par exemple les benzodiazépines tels que le diazépam (Valium), l'alprazolam (Xanax) et le lorazépam (Ativan), et les non-benzodiazépines tels que le metaxalone (Skelaxin) ou une combinaison de paracétamol et d'orphénadrine (Muscol)) et des médicaments qui empêchent l'augmentation du tonus musculaire (baclofène et dantrolène). En dépit de la pénurie de preuves à l'appui de leur utilisation, les myorelaxants antispasmodiques et antispasticité sont aujourd'hui largement utilisés comme adjuvants dans la gestion des patients souffrant de douleur musculo-squelettique chronique.

Objectifs

L’objectif de cette revue était de déterminer l’efficacité et l’innocuité des myorelaxants pour la gestion de la douleur chez les patients souffrant d’AR. Les myorelaxants qui ont été inclus dans cette revue sont les antispasmodiques benzodiazépines (alprazolam, bromazépam, chlordiazépoxide, cinolazepam, clonazépam, cloxazolam, clorazépate, diazépam, l'estazolam, flunitrazépam, flurazépam, flutoprazepam, halazépam, kétazolam, loprazolam, lorazépam, lormétazépam, médazépam, midazolam, nimétazépam, nitrazépam, nordazépam, oxazépam, pinazépam, prazépam, quazépam, témazépam, tétrazépam et triazolam), les antispasmodiques non-benzodiazépines (cyclobenzaprine, carisoprodol, chlorzoxazone, méprobamate, méthocarbamol, metaxalone, orphénadrine, tizanidine et zopiclone) et les médicaments antispasticité (baclofène et dantrolène sodique).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library , 4ème trimestre 2010), MEDLINE (de 1950 jusqu'à la 1ère semaine de novembre 2010), EMBASE (44ème semaine 2010) et PsycINFO (de 1806 jusqu'à la 2ème semaine de novembre 2010). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les résumés 2008 et 2009 de l’American College of Rheumatology (ACR) et de la Ligue européenne contre le rhumatisme (EULAR), ainsi que des recherches manuelles dans les bibliographies d’articles pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant un myorelaxant à un autre traitement (actif, y compris thérapies non pharmacologiques, ou placebo) chez des patients adultes souffrant d’AR, dans la mesure où ils rendaient compte d'au moins une mesure de résultat cliniquement pertinente.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les deux auteurs de cette revue, qui ont été masqués, ont extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais dans les essais de manière indépendante. Des méta-analyses ont été utilisées afin d’examiner l’efficacité des myorelaxants sur la douleur, la dépression, le sommeil et l’état fonctionnel, ainsi que leur innocuité.

Résultats Principaux

Six essais (126 participants) ont été inclus dans cette revue. Tous les essais ont été considérés à risque élevé de biais. Cinq essais croisés avaient évalué une benzodiazépine, quatre avaient évalué le diazépam (n = 71) et un avait évalué le triazolam (n = 15). Le sixième essai avait évalué la zopiclone (un non-benzodiazépine) (n = 40) et était une étude en groupes parallèles. La durée d'aucun essai n'était supérieure à deux semaines et trois essais à dose unique avaient évalué les résultats après seulement 24 heures. Globalement, les essais inclus n'avaient pas réussi à trouver de preuves d'un effet bénéfique des myorelaxants par rapport au placebo, seuls (après 24 heures ou 1 ou 2 semaines) ou en adjonction à des anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS) (après 24 h), sur l'intensité de la douleur, le fonctionnement ou la qualité de vie. Les données de deux essais d'une durée de plus de 24 heures (n = 74) (diazépam et zopiclone) ont révélé que les participants ayant reçu un myorelaxant avaient subi significativement plus d'événements indésirables que ceux ayant reçu un placebo (nombre nécessaire pour nuire (NNN) 3 / IC à 95 % 2 à 7). Il s'agissait principalement d'effets secondaires sur le système nerveux central, dont des étourdissements et de la somnolence (NNN 3 / IC à 95 % 2 à 11).

Conclusions des auteurs

Sur la base des données actuellement disponibles sur des patients atteints d'AR, les benzodiazépines (diazépam et triazolam) ne semblent pas contribuer à alléger la douleur sur 24 heures ou une semaine. L'agent non-benzodiazépine zopiclone n'a pas non plus réduit la douleur de manière significative sur deux semaines. Cependant, même utilisés sur le court terme (entre 24 heures et 2 semaines), les myorelaxants sont associés à d'importants effets indésirables, principalement de la somnolence et des vertiges.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Myorelaxants pour la gestion de la douleur de l'arthrite rhumatoïde

Myorelaxants pour la gestion de la douleur de l'arthrite rhumatoïde

Ce résumé d’une revue Cochrane présente les connaissances tirées des recherches portant sur les effets des myorelaxants sur la douleur des patients souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde.

Cette revue démontre que chez les patients souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde :

- Les myorelaxants sont susceptibles de ne pas alléger la douleur lorsqu'ils sont pris en dose unique ou pendant une période ne dépassant pas deux semaines

- Vue la très faible qualité des données, nous ne savons pas si les myorelaxants affectent l'état fonctionnel

- Aucun essai ayant évalué si les myorelaxants affectent la qualité de la vie n'a été trouvé

- Aucun essai ayant évalué si les antidépresseurs affectent le sommeil n'a été trouvé

- Vue la très faible qualité des données, nous ne savons pas si les myorelaxants affectent l'humeur

Nous ne disposons pas non plus d'informations précises sur les effets secondaires et les complications. Ceci est particulièrement vrai pour les effets secondaires rares mais graves. Parmi les éventuels effets secondaires figurent : les états de fatigue ou nauséeux, les maux de tête, la vision troublée, la sécheresse buccale, les troubles sexuels, les vertiges ou les constipations. Les complications rares se manifestent par l'augmentation des pensées suicidaires, les inflammations hépatiques ou la baisse du nombre de globules blancs.

Qu’est-ce que l’arthrite rhumatoïde et que sont les myorelaxants ?

Lorsque vous souffrez d’une arthrite rhumatoïde, votre système immunitaire, qui combat normalement les infections, attaque la paroi de vos articulations. Cela fait gonfler vos articulations et les rend raides et douloureuses. Les petites articulations de vos mains et de vos pieds sont généralement les premières touchées. Il n’existe à l’heure actuelle aucun remède pour l’arthrite rhumatoïde et les traitements visent donc à soulager la douleur et la raideur, ainsi qu’à améliorer votre capacité à vous déplacer.

Les myorelaxants peuvent être utilisés pour traiter l'anxiété et faciliter le sommeil ; certaines personnes pensent également qu’ils peuvent atténuer la douleur en agissant sur les nerfs à l’origine de la douleur, mais cela reste sujet à controverse. Les myorelaxants englobent des médicaments qui réduisent les spasmes musculaires (par exemple les benzodiazépines tels que le diazépam (Valium), le Xanax et l'Ativan, et les non-benzodiazépines tels que le Skelaxin et le Muscol) et des médicaments qui empêchent l'augmentation du tonus musculaire (baclofène et dantrolène).

Meilleure estimation de ce qui arrive aux personnes souffrant d’arthrite rhumatoïde et qui prennent des myorelaxants :

Douleur après 24 heures :

- Résultat non significatif.

Douleur après 1 à 2 semaines :

- Résultat non significatif.

Retrait en raison d'effets indésirables, après 2 semaines :

- Résultat non significatif.

Nombre total d'effets secondaires :

- 49 personnes de plus sur 100 ont subi un événement indésirable, après 1 à 2 semaines, quand ils prenaient un myorelaxant (différence absolue de 49 %),

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris un myorelaxant, 52 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable,

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris un placebo, 3 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable.

Effets indésirables sur le système nerveux central (SNC) :

- 33 personnes de plus sur 100 ont subi un effet indésirable sur le SNC, après 1 à 2 semaines, quand ils prenaient un myorelaxant (différence absolue de 33 %),

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris un myorelaxant, 39 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable,

- Sur 100 patients ayant pris un relaxant placebo, 6 ont souffert d’un effet indésirable,

Ce rapport doit être cité comme suit :

Ceci est l'abrégé et le résume simplifié d'une revue Cochrane, préparée et entretenue par la Cochrane Collaboration, qui est actuellement publiée dans la base des revues systématiques Cochrane [numéro et date] © [année] The Cochrane Collaboration. Publié par John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Le texte intégral de la revue est disponible à The Cochrane Library (ISSN 1464-780X).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th April, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français