Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria

  1. Lucy S Tusting1,
  2. Julie Thwing2,*,
  3. David Sinclair3,
  4. Ulrike Fillinger1,
  5. John Gimnig4,
  6. Kimberly E Bonner5,
  7. Christian Bottomley6,
  8. Steven W Lindsay1,7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 29 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008923.pub2


How to Cite

Tusting LS, Thwing J, Sinclair D, Fillinger U, Gimnig J, Bonner KE, Bottomley C, Lindsay SW. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD008923. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008923.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Department of Disease Control, London, UK

  2. 2

    US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Strategic and Applied Science Unit, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  3. 3

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Liverpool, UK

  4. 4

    US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Entomology Branch, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  5. 5

    Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton, New Jersey, USA

  6. 6

    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, MRC Tropical Epidemiology Group, London, UK

  7. 7

    Durham University, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham, UK

*Julie Thwing, Strategic and Applied Science Unit, Malaria Branch, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mailstop F-22, Atlanta, Georgia, GA 30341, USA. fez3@cdc.gov.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 29 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Malaria is an important cause of illness and death in people living in many parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) reduce malaria transmission by targeting the adult mosquito vector and are key components of malaria control programmes. However, mosquito numbers may also be reduced by larval source management (LSM), which targets mosquito larvae as they mature in aquatic habitats. This is conducted by permanently or temporarily reducing the availability of larval habitats (habitat modification and habitat manipulation), or by adding substances to standing water that either kill or inhibit the development of larvae (larviciding).

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito LSM for preventing malaria.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CABS Abstracts; and LILACS up to 24 October 2012. We handsearched the Tropical Diseases Bulletin from 1900 to 2010, the archives of the World Health Organization (up to 11 February 2011), and the literature database of the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (up to 2 March 2011). We also contacted colleagues in the field for relevant articles.

Selection criteria

We included cluster randomized controlled trials (cluster-RCTs), controlled before-and-after trials with at least one year of baseline data, and randomized cross-over trials that compared LSM with no LSM for malaria control. We excluded trials that evaluated biological control of anopheline mosquitoes with larvivorous fish.

Data collection and analysis

At least two authors assessed each trial for eligibility. We extracted data and at least two authors independently determined the risk of bias in the included studies. We resolved all disagreements through discussion with a third author. We analyzed the data using Review Manager 5 software.

Main results

We included 13 studies; four cluster-RCTs, eight controlled before-and-after trials, and one randomized cross-over trial. The included studies evaluated habitat modification (one study), habitat modification with larviciding (two studies), habitat manipulation (one study), habitat manipulation plus larviciding (two studies), or larviciding alone (seven studies) in a wide variety of habitats and countries.

Malaria incidence

In two cluster-RCTs undertaken in Sri Lanka, larviciding of abandoned mines, streams, irrigation ditches, and rice paddies reduced malaria incidence by around three-quarters compared to the control (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.31, 20,124 participants, two trials, moderate quality evidence). In three controlled before-and-after trials in urban and rural India and rural Kenya, results were inconsistent (98,233 participants, three trials, very low quality evidence). In one trial in urban India, the removal of domestic water containers together with weekly larviciding of canals and stagnant pools reduced malaria incidence by three quarters. In one trial in rural India and one trial in rural Kenya, malaria incidence was higher at baseline in intervention areas than in controls. However dam construction in India, and larviciding of streams and swamps in Kenya, reduced malaria incidence to levels similar to the control areas. In one additional randomized cross-over trial in the flood plains of the Gambia River, where larval habitats were extensive and ill-defined, larviciding by ground teams did not result in a statistically significant reduction in malaria incidence (2039 participants, one trial).

Parasite prevalence

In one cluster-RCT from Sri Lanka, larviciding reduced parasite prevalence by almost 90% (RR 0.11, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.22, 2963 participants, one trial, moderate quality evidence). In five controlled before-and-after trials in Greece, India, the Philippines, and Tanzania, LSM resulted in an average reduction in parasite prevalence of around two-thirds (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.55, 8041 participants, five trials, moderate quality evidence). The interventions in these five trials included dam construction to reduce larval habitats, flushing of streams, removal of domestic water containers, and larviciding. In the randomized cross-over trial in the flood plains of the Gambia River, larviciding by ground teams did not significantly reduce parasite prevalence (2039 participants, one trial).

Authors' conclusions

In Africa and Asia, LSM is another policy option, alongside LLINs and IRS, for reducing malaria morbidity in both urban and rural areas where a sufficient proportion of larval habitats can be targeted. Further research is needed to evaluate whether LSM is appropriate or feasible in parts of rural Africa where larval habitats are more extensive.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria

What is larval source management and how might it work?

Malaria is an infectious disease transmitted from person to person by mosquitoes, and the main interventions insecticide treated bed-nets and indoor residual spraying reduce malaria infection by targeting adult mosquitoes. Larval source management (LSM) also aims to reduce malaria but instead targets immature mosquitoes, which are found in standing water, before they develop into flying adults. This is done by permanently removing standing water, for example by draining or filling land; making temporary changes to mosquito habitats to disrupt breeding, for example by clearing drains to make the water flow; or by adding chemicals, biological larvicides, or natural predators to standing water to kill larvae.

What does the research show?

We examined all the published and unpublished research up to 24 October 2012, and included 13 studies in this review.

Where larval habitats are not too extensive and a sufficient proportion of these habitats can be targeted, LSM probably reduces the number of people that will develop malaria (moderate quality evidence), and probably reduces the proportion of the population infected with the malaria parasite at any one time (moderate quality evidence).

LSM was shown to be effective in Sri Lanka, India, the Philippines, Greece, Kenya, and Tanzania, where interventions included adding larvicide to abandoned mine pits, streams, irrigation ditches and rice paddies where mosquitos breed, and building dams, flushing streams, and removing water containers from around people’s homes.

In one study from The Gambia where mosquitos were breeding in large swamps and rice paddies, spraying swamps with larvicide using ground teams did not show any benefit.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Gestion des gîtes larvaires des moustiques dans la lutte contre le paludisme

Contexte

Le paludisme est une importante cause de maladie et de décès chez les personnes vivant dans de nombreuses régions du monde, surtout en Afrique subsaharienne. Les moustiquaires imprégnées d'insecticide de longue durée (LLIN) et la pulvérisation d'insecticide à effet rémanent à l'intérieur des habitations (IRS) réduisent la transmission paludéenne en ciblant les moustiques adultes vecteurs et sont des composantes essentielles des programmes de lutte contre le paludisme. Toutefois, les quantités de moustiques peuvent aussi être réduites par la gestion des gîtes larvaires (GGL), qui cible les larves de moustiques au fur et à mesure qu'elles se développent et deviennent des insectes adultes dans les habitats aquatiques. Cela peut être effectué par la réduction définitive ou temporaire de la disponibilité des habitats des larves (modification de l'habitat et manipulation de l'habitat), ou par addition de substances chimiques aux eaux stagnantes qui soit tuent soit inhibent le développement des larves (larvicides).

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité de la gestion des gîtes larvaires des moustiques dans la prévention du paludisme.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses ; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) ; MEDLINE ; EMBASE ; CABS Abstracts ; et LILACS jusqu'au 24 octobre 2012. Nous avons effectué des recherches manuelles dans le Bulletin des maladies tropicales de 1900 à 2010, les archives de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé (jusqu'au 11 février 2011), et la base de données de la littérature de l'Armed Forces Pest Management Board (jusqu'au 2 mars 2011). Nous avons également contacté des confères/consœurs dans le domaine afin d'obtenir des articles pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR en grappes), les études contrôlées avant-après (CAA), comprenant le recueil de données pendant au moins un an depuis l'inclusion, et les essais croisés randomisés ayant comparé la gestion des gîtes larvaires (GGL) à l'absence de gestion des gîtes larvaires dans la lutte contre le paludisme. Nous avons exclu les essais ayant évalué le contrôle biologique des moustiques anophèles avec des larves de poissons.

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs ont évalué l'éligibilité de chaque essai. Nous avons extrait des données et au moins deux auteurs ont indépendamment déterminé le risque de biais dans les études incluses. Les désaccords ont été résolus par la discussion avec un troisième auteur. Nous avons analysé les données au moyen du logiciel Review Manager (RevMan5).

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 13 études ; quatre ECR en grappes, huit études contrôlées avant-après (CAA), et un essai croisé randomisé. Les études incluses ont évalué la modification de l'habitat (une étude), la modification de l'habitat avec des larvicides (deux études), la manipulation de l'habitat (une étude), la manipulation de l'habitat plus des larvicides (deux études), ou des larvicides seuls (sept études) dans des habitats et des pays très variés.

incidence du paludisme

Dans deux ECR en grappes menés au Sri Lanka, la pulvérisation de larvicide dans les mines abandonnées, les courants d'eau, l'irrigation des rigoles et des rizières ont réduit l'incidence du paludisme d'environ trois quarts par rapport à l'intervention témoin (RR 0,26, IC à 95 % 0,22 à 0,31, 20 124 participants, deux essais, preuves de qualité modérée). Dans trois études contrôlées avant-après (CAA) en zone urbaine et en zone rurale en Inde, et en zone rurale au Kenya, les résultats ont été contradictoires (98 233 participants, trois essais, preuves de très faible qualité). Dans un essai en zone urbaine en Inde, l'élimination des conteneurs d'eau domestiques associée à une pulvérisation hebdomadaire de larvicides dans les canaux et les eaux stagnantes ont permis de réduire l'incidence du paludisme de trois quarts. Dans un essai en zone rurale en Inde et un essai en zone rurale au Kenya, l'incidence du paludisme a été plus élevée à l'inclusion dans les zones avec intervention que dans le cas des zones avec interventions témoins. Toutefois, la construction de barrages en Inde, et la pulvérisation de larvicides dans les courants d'eau et les marécages au Kenya, ont permis de réduire l'incidence du paludisme jusqu'à des niveaux similaires à ceux des zones avec interventions témoins. Dans un essai croisé randomisé supplémentaire mené dans les plaines inondées du fleuve Gambie, où les gîtes larvaires ont été innombrables et mal définis, la pulvérisation de larvicides par des équipes sur le terrain n'a pas entraîné de réduction statistiquement significative de l'incidence du paludisme (2 039 participants, un essai).

Prévalence du parasite

Dans un ECR en grappes mené au Sri Lanka, la pulvérisation de larvicides a réduit la prévalence du parasite de près de 90 % (RR 0,11, IC à 95 % 0,05 à 0,22, 2 963 participants, un essai, preuves de qualité modérée). Dans cinq études contrôlées avant-après (CAA) menées en Grèce, en Inde, aux Philippines et en Tanzanie, la gestion des gîtes larvaires (GGL) a entraîné une réduction moyenne de la prévalence du parasite d'environ deux tiers (RR 0,32, IC à 95 % 0,19 à 0,55, 8 041 participants, cinq essais, preuves de qualité modérée). Les interventions dans ces cinq essais ont inclus la construction de barrages pour réduire les gîtes larvaires, le rinçage à haut débit des courants d'eau, l'élimination des conteneurs d'eau domestiques et la pulvérisation de larvicides. Dans l'essai croisé randomisé mené dans les plaines inondées du fleuve Gambie, la pulvérisation de larvicides par des équipes sur le terrain n'a pas permis de réduire de façon significative la prévalence du parasite (2 039 participants, un essai).

Conclusions des auteurs

En Afrique et en Asie, la gestion des gîtes larvaires (GGL) est une option politique, en complément des moustiquaires imprégnées d'insecticide de longue durée (LLIN) et de la pulvérisation d'insecticide à effet rémanent à l'intérieur des habitations (IRS), pour réduire la morbidité due au paludisme aussi bien en zone urbaine qu'en zone rurale où il est possible de cibler une proportion suffisante de gîtes larvaires. Il est nécessaire d'effectuer des recherches supplémentaires afin d'évaluer si la gestion des gîtes larvaires (GGL) est appropriée ou faisable dans des régions d'Afrique en zone rurale où les gîtes larvaires sont plus étendus.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Gestion des gîtes larvaires des moustiques dans la lutte contre le paludisme

Gestion des gîtes larvaires des moustiques dans la lutte contre le paludisme

Qu'est-ce que la gestion des gîtes larvaires et comment peut-elle agir efficacement ?

Le paludisme est une maladie infectieuse transmise d'une personne à une autre personne par les moustiques, et les principales interventions, à savoir traitement insecticide des moustiquaires et pulvérisation d'insecticide à effet rémanent à l'intérieur des habitations réduisent l'infection paludéenne en ciblant les moustiques adultes. La gestion des gîtes larvaires (GGL) a également pour objectif de réduire le paludisme mais cible plutôt les larves et les nymphes de moustiques, qui vivent dans les eaux stagnantes, avant leur développement en insectes adultes. Elle fait référence à l'élimination définitive des eaux stagnantes, par exemple en drainant ou remplissant la terre ; des modifications temporaires des habitats des moustiques pour empêcher leur reproduction, par exemple un drainage de l'eau en surface ; ou l'addition de produits chimiques, de larvicides biologiques, ou de prédateurs naturels dans les eaux stagnantes pour tuer les larves.

Qu'ont démontré les études ?

Nous avons examiné toutes les études de recherche publiées et non publiées jusqu'au 24 octobre 2012, et avons inclus 13 études dans cette revue.

Lorsque les habitats larvaires ne sont pas trop étendus et qu'une proportion suffisante de ces habitats peut être ciblée, la gestion des gîtes larvaires réduit probablement le nombre de personnes qui développeront le paludisme (preuves de qualité modérée), et réduit probablement la proportion de la population infectée par le parasite du paludisme à n'importe quel moment (preuves de qualité modérée).

Il s'avère que la gestion des gîtes larvaires est efficace au Sri Lanka, en Inde, aux Philippines, en Grèce, au Kenya et en Tanzanie, où les interventions incluaient l'addition de larvicides aux puits des mines abandonnées, aux courants d'eau, l'irrigation des rigoles et des rizières dans lesquelles les moustiques se reproduisent, et la construction de barrages, le rinçage à haut débit des courants d'eau, et l'élimination des conteneurs d'eau à proximité des habitations des populations.

Dans une étude menée en Gambie où les moustiques se reproduisaient dans les grands marécages et les rizières, la pulvérisation de larvicides dans les marécages en faisant appel à des équipes sur le terrain n'a pas entraîné le moindre bénéfice.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.