Intervention Review

Pain management for inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and other spondyloarthritis) and gastrointestinal or liver comorbidity

  1. Helga Radner1,*,
  2. Sofia Ramiro2,3,
  3. Rachelle Buchbinder4,
  4. Robert BM Landewé3,5,
  5. Désirée van der Heijde6,
  6. Daniel Aletaha1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group

Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008951.pub2

How to Cite

Radner H, Ramiro S, Buchbinder R, Landewé RBM, van der Heijde D, Aletaha D. Pain management for inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and other spondyloarthritis) and gastrointestinal or liver comorbidity. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD008951. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008951.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Medical University Vienna, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine 3, Vienna, Austria

  2. 2

    Hospital Garcia de Orta, Department of Rheumatology, Almada, Portugal

  3. 3

    Academic Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  4. 4

    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Cabrini Hospital, Malvern, Victoria, Australia

  5. 5

    Atrium Medical Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Heerlen, Limburg, Netherlands

  6. 6

    Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden, Netherlands

*Helga Radner, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine 3, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna, 1090, Austria. helga.radner@meduniwien.ac.at.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Even with optimal disease-modifying treatment and good control of disease activity, persistent pain due to structural damage is common in people with inflammatory arthritis and therefore additional treatment for pain might be required. Because comorbidity is highly prevalent in people with inflammatory arthritis, it is important to consider comorbidities such as gastrointestinal or liver diseases in deciding upon optimal pharmacologic pain therapy.

Objectives

To assess the efficacy and safety of pharmacological pain treatment in patients with inflammatory arthritis who have gastrointestinal or liver comorbidities, or both.

Search methods

We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies, to June 2010. We also searched the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) conference abstracts (2007 to 2010) and performed a handsearch of reference lists of articles.

Selection criteria

All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs or CCTs) were considered for inclusion, for the assessment of efficacy. For safety, we also considered single arm trials, controlled before-after studies, interrupted time series, cohort and case-control studies, and case series of 10 or more consecutive cases. Pain therapy comprised paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, opioid-like drugs (tramadol) and neuromodulators (antidepressants, anticonvulsants and muscle relaxants). The study population comprised adults (≥ 18 years) with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis or other spondyloarthritis who had gastrointestinal or hepatic, or both, comorbid conditions. Outcomes of interest were pain, adverse effects, function and quality of life. Studies that included a mixed population of inflammatory arthritis and other conditions were included only if results for inflammatory arthritis were reported separately.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted data.

Main results

From 2869 identified articles only one single arm open trial fulfilled our inclusion criteria. This trial assessed the safety and efficacy of naproxen (dosage not specified) in 58 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and gastrointestinal comorbidities for up to 52 weeks. Thirteen participants (22%) remained on gold therapy, four participants (10%) remained on hydroxychloroquine, 27 (47%) remained on corticosteroids, 12 (21%) remained on salicylates and all participants continued on antacids and a bland diet. The presence of faecal occult blood was reported in 1/58 participants tested between weeks 1 to 26 and 2/32 participants tested between weeks 27 to 52. Over the course of the study, seven participants (12.1%) withdrew due to adverse events but, of these, only two participants withdrew due to gastrointestinal side effects (abdominal pain n = 1, nausea n = 1) and no serious adverse events were reported. It was noteable that out of 14 studies excluded due to inclusion of a mixed population (osteoarthritis or other rheumatic conditions) or an intervention that was already withdrawn, five trials reported a higher risk of developing gastrointestinal events in patients with prior gastrointestinal events when treated with NSAIDs.

Authors' conclusions

On the basis of the current review, there is scant evidence to guide clinicians about how gastrointestinal or liver comorbidities should influence the choice of pain treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis or other spondyloarthritis. Based upon additional studies that included a mixed population of participants with a range of rheumatic conditions, NSAIDs should be used cautiously in patients with inflammatory arthritis and a history of gastrointestinaI comorbidity as there is consistent evidence that they may be at increased risk.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Pain in patients with inflammatory arthritis and gastrointestinal or liver problems

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of pain relieving drugs for people with inflammatory arthritis plus stomach or gut disease, or liver disease.

The review shows the following in people with inflammatory arthritis plus stomach or gut disease, such as hernia or stomach or intestinal ulcers or previous bleeding from the stomach or intestine, or patients with liver diseases such as hepatitis or fatty liver:

- We are uncertain if naproxen (Aleve®, Naprosyn®) produced more side effects in people with inflammatory arthiritis plus stomach or intestine disease, compared with people with inflammatory arthritis without stomach or intestine disease, because only a single study giving low quality evidence was available.

- No studies were found that looked at pain relief.

- No studies were found that looked at other pain-relieving drugs.

- No studies were found in people with conditions other than rheumatoid arthritis.

- No studies were found in people with inflammatory arthritis plus liver disease.

We do not have precise information about side effects and complications, particularly for rare but serious side effects. Possible side effects associated with high dose paracetamol include liver problems. Aspirin and NSAIDs may cause stomach, kidney or heart problems.

What is inflammatory arthritis and what is pain management

Inflammatory arthritis is a group of diseases that includes rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and other types of spondyloarthritis. When you have inflammatory arthritis your immune system, which normally fights infection, attacks your joints. This makes your joints swollen, stiff and painful. In rheumatoid arthritis, the small joints of your hands and feet are usually affected first. In contrast, in ankylosing spondylitis the joints of the spine are the most affected. There is no cure for inflammatory arthritis at present, so the treatments aim to relieve pain and stiffness and improve your ability to move.

Paracetamol, or acetaminophen, is used to relieve pain but does not affect swelling; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen and COX-2s (for example celecoxib) are used to decrease pain and swelling. Opioids, such as codeine-containing Tylenol®, hydromorphone (Dilaudid®), oxycodone (Percocet®, Percodan®), morphine and the opioid-like drug tramadol are powerful pain-relieving substances. Other drugs have some pain-relieving properties and can therefore be used to control pain. This is the case of the so-called neuromodulators, such as antidepressants (for example fluoxetine, paroxetine, amitriptyline), anticonvulsants (for example gabapentine, pregabaline) or muscle relaxants (for example diazepam).

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Gestion de la douleur en cas d'arthrite inflammatoire (arthrite rhumatoïde, arthrite psoriasique, spondylarthrite ankylosante et autres spondylarthrites) avec comorbidité gastro-intestinale ou hépatique

Contexte

Même avec un traitement modificateur de la maladie optimalisé et une bon contrôle de l'activité de la maladie, il est fréquent que persiste chez les personnes souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire une douleur due à des dommages structurels, et un traitement antidouleur supplémentaire peut donc s'avérer nécessaire. La comorbidité étant très fréquente chez les personnes souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire, il est important de tenir compte de ces comorbidités, telles que des maladies gastro-intestinales ou hépatiques, dans le choix d'une thérapie pharmacologique antidouleur optimale.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité du traitement pharmacologique de la douleur chez les patients souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire et atteints de comorbidités gastro-intestinales et/ou hépatiques.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons recherché des études dans MEDLINE, EMBASE et Cochrane CENTRAL jusqu'à juin 2010. Nous avons également recherché dans les résumés 2007-2010 de l'ACR et de l'EULAR et, manuellement, dans des bibliographies d'articles.

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais randomisés ou quasi-randomisés (ECR ou ECC) ont été considérés pour inclusion à fin d'évaluation de l'efficacité. Pour l'innocuité, nous avons également considéré les essais à un seul groupe, les études contrôlées avant-après, les séries chronologiques interrompues, les études de cohorte, les études cas-témoins et les séries d'au moins 10 cas consécutifs. Le traitement de la douleur consistait en du paracétamol, des anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS), des opioïdes, des pseudo-opioïdes (tramadol) et des neuromodulateurs (anti-dépresseurs, anticonvulsivants et myorelaxants). La population étudiée comprenait des adultes (>18 ans) atteints de polyarthrite rhumatoïde, d'arthrite psoriasique, de spondylarthrite ankylosante ou d'autres spondylarthrites et souffrant de comorbidités gastro-intestinales et/ou hépatiques. Les critères de jugement étaient la douleur, les effets indésirables, le fonctionnement et la qualité de vie. Des études portant sur une population mixte d'arthrite inflammatoire et d'autres pathologies n'ont été incluses que si les résultats au niveau de l'arthrite inflammatoire étaient rapportés séparément.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné les essais à inclure, évalué les risques de biais et extrait les données de manière indépendante.

Résultats Principaux

Parmi 2 869 articles nous n'avons identifié qu'un essai ouvert à un seul groupe répondant à nos critères d'inclusion. Cet essai avait évalué l'innocuité et l'efficacité du naproxène (dose non précisée) chez 58 patients atteints d'arthrite rhumatoïde active avec comorbidités gastro-intestinales, sur des périodes allant jusqu'à 52 semaines. Treize participants (22 %) avaient continué à recevoir le traitement standard de référence, quatre participants (10 %) de l'hydroxychloroquine, 27 (47 %) des corticostéroïdes, 12 (21 %) des salicylés et tous les participants avaient continué avec les antiacides et le régime alimentaire fade. La présence de sang occulte dans les selles a été signalée chez 1 des 58 participants testés entre les semaines 1 à 26 et chez 2 des 32 participants testés entre les semaines 27 à 52. Au cours de l'étude, sept participants (12,1 %) avaient quitté en raison d'effets indésirables, mais parmi ceux-ci deux participants seulement s'étaient retirés en raison d'effets secondaires gastro-intestinaux (douleurs abdominales n = 1, nausées n = 1) et aucun événement indésirable grave n'avait été signalé. À noter que sur 14 études exclues en raison de l'inclusion d'une population mixte (ostéo-arthrite ou autres affections rhumatismales) ou d'une intervention déjà retirée, cinq études avaient rendu compte d'un risque plus élevé de développer des événements gastro-intestinaux chez les patients ayant déjà souffert de troubles gastro-intestinaux, s'ils étaient traités avec des AINS.

Conclusions des auteurs

La présente revue ne fournit que de maigres éléments pour guider les cliniciens sur la façon dont les comorbidités gastro-intestinales ou hépatiques devraient influencer le choix du traitement antidouleur chez les patients souffrant d'arthrite rhumatoïde, d'arthrite psoriasique, de spondylarthrite ankylosante ou d'autres spondylarthrites. D'après des études supplémentaires qui incluaient une population mixte de participants atteints d'une variété de maladies rhumatismales, les AINS devraient être utilisés avec prudence chez les patients souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire et ayant un historique de comorbidité gastro-intestinale, étant donné que l'on dispose de preuves cohérentes que ces personnes sont exposées à un plus grand risque.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Gestion de la douleur en cas d'arthrite inflammatoire (arthrite rhumatoïde, arthrite psoriasique, spondylarthrite ankylosante et autres spondylarthrites) avec comorbidité gastro-intestinale ou hépatique

La douleur chez les patients atteints d'arthrite inflammatoire et de problèmes gastro-intestinaux ou hépatiques

Ce résumé d'une revue Cochrane présente ce que nous savons de la recherche sur l'effet des médicaments analgésiques pour personnes souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire accompagnée d'une maladie gastro-intestinale ou hépatique.

La revue montre que chez les personnes souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire à laquelle s'ajoute une maladie gastro-intestinale, telle que l'hernie ou les ulcères gastriques ou intestinaux, des antécédents d'hémorragie stomacale ou intestinale, ou une maladie du foie comme l'hépatite ou la stéatose hépatique :

- Nous ne savons pas si le naproxène (Aleve®, Naprosyn®) produit plus d'effets secondaires chez les personnes souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire accompagnée d'une maladie gastro-intestinale, que chez les personnes souffrant d'arthrite inflammatoire sans maladie gastro-intestinale parce qu'une seule étude était disponible et que les données qu'elle présentait étaient de faible qualité.

- Aucune étude ayant examiné le soulagement de la douleur n’a été trouvée.

- Aucune étude portant sur d'autres médicaments analgésiques n’a été trouvée.

- Aucune étude n’a été trouvée sur des personnes présentant des affections autres que l’arthrite rhumatoïde.

- Aucune étude n’a été trouvée sur des personnes souffrant conjointement d’arthrite inflammatoire et d'une maladie hépatique.

Les informations dont nous disposons sur les effets secondaires et les complications, notamment les effets secondaires rares mais graves, sont imprécises. Les effets secondaires potentiellement associés à des doses élevées de paracétamol incluent les problèmes hépatiques. L'aspirine et les AINS peuvent causer des problèmes à l'estomac, aux reins ou au cœur.

Qu'est-ce que l'arthrite rhumatoïde et qu'entend-on par gestion de la douleur :

L’arthrite inflammatoire regroupe plusieurs maladies dont : l’arthrite rhumatoïde, la spondylarthrite ankylosante, l’arthrite psoriasique et d’autres types de spondylarthrites. Lorsque vous souffrez d’arthrite inflammatoire, votre système immunitaire, qui combat normalement les infections, attaque vos articulations. Cela fait gonfler vos articulations et les rend raides et douloureuses. Dans le cas de l’arthrite rhumatoïde, les petites articulations de vos mains et de vos pieds sont généralement les premières touchées. En revanche, dans le cas de la spondylarthrite ankylosante, les articulations de la colonne vertébrale sont les plus touchées. Il n’existe à l’heure actuelle aucun remède contre l’arthrite inflammatoire. Les traitements visent donc à soulager la douleur et la raideur, ainsi qu’à améliorer votre capacité à vous déplacer.

Le paracétamol, ou acétaminophène, est utilisé pour soulager la douleur, mais n’atténue pas les gonflements ; les médicaments anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS), comme l’ibuprofène, le diclofénac, le naproxène et les COX-2 (par ex. le célécoxib), sont utilisés pour atténuer la douleur et les gonflements. Les opioïdes, tels que le Tylenol ® contenant de la codéine, l'hydromorphone (Dilaudid®), l'oxycodone (Percocet®, Percodan®) et la morphine, ainsi que le médicament pseudo-opioïde tramadol, sont de puissantes substances analgésiques. D'autres médicaments ont certaines propriétés antidouleur et peuvent donc être utilisés essentiellement pour contrôler la douleur. C'est le cas de ceux qu'on appelle les neuromodulateurs, comme les antidépresseurs (par ex. fluoxétine, paroxétine et amitriptyline), les anticonvulsivants (par ex. gabapentine et prégabaline) ou les myorelaxants (par ex. diazépam).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th April, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français