Get access

Pain management for rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular or renal comorbidity

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Jonathan L Marks,

    Corresponding author
    1. Southampton General Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Southampton, Hampshire, UK
    • Jonathan L Marks, Department of Rheumatology, Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, Hampshire, SO16 6YD, UK. dr_jonmarks@yahoo.com.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alexandra N Colebatch,

    1. Southampton General Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Southampton; Consultant Rheumatologist Yeovil District Hospital, Somerset, Hampshire, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rachelle Buchbinder,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Monash Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Cabrini Hospital, Malvern, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Christopher J Edwards

    1. Southampton General Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Southampton, Hampshire, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

Pain in rheumatoid arthritis is common, is often multi-factorial and many different pharmacotherapeutic agents are routinely used for pain management. There are concerns that some of the pain pharmacotherapies currently used may increase the risk of adverse events in people with rheumatoid arthritis and concurrent cardiovascular or renal disease.

Objectives

To systematically assess and collate the scientific evidence on the efficacy and safety of using pain pharmacotherapy in people with rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular or renal comorbidities.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4); MEDLINE, from 1950; EMBASE, from 1980; the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). We also handsearched the conference proceedings for American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) for 2008-09, and checked the websites of regulatory agencies for reported adverse events, labels and warnings.

Selection criteria

We considered randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies comparing the efficacy and safety of pain pharmacotherapies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, with and without comorbid cardiovascular or renal conditions.

In addition, we also considered controlled before-after studies, interrupted time series, cohort and case control studies and case series (N ≥ 20) to assess safety.

For the purpose of our review, pain pharmacotherapy was defined as including simple analgesics (such as paracetamol), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids or opioid-like drugs (such as tramadol), and neuromodulators (including anti-depressants, anti-convulsants, and muscle relaxants).

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed the search results and planned to extract data and appraise the risk of bias of included studies.

Main results

We did not identify any studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Many of the trials of NSAIDs explicitly excluded patients with cardiovascular or renal comorbidities.

We did identify one trial that reported evidence in mixed populations (including both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis) taking either diclofenac or etoricoxib. In this study, the presence of cardiovascular disease increased the likelihood of a further cardiovascular event three-fold. Patients with two or more cardiovascular comorbidities showed a two-fold increased likelihood of adverse cardiovascular events.

Authors' conclusions

There were no trials that specifically compared the efficacy and safety of pain pharmacotherapies for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, with and without comorbid cardiovascular or renal conditions.

In the absence of specific evidence in rheumatoid arthritis, current guidelines recommend that NSAIDs be used with caution in the general rheumatoid arthritis population while highlighting the added need for extra vigilance in patients with established cardiovascular disease or risk factors for its development. Current guidelines regarding the use of NSAIDs and opioids in moderate to severe renal impairment should also be applied to the rheumatoid arthritis population.

Further research is required to guide clinicians when treating pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

Résumé scientifique

Pain management for rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular or renal comorbidity

Contexte

Dans la polyarthrite rhumatoïde la douleur est fréquente, souvent multi-factorielle, et de nombreux agents pharmacothérapeutiques différents sont couramment utilisés pour prendre en charge cette douleur. On craint que certains traitements antalgiques pharmacologiques actuellement utilisés puissent augmenter le risque d'événements indésirables chez les personnes souffrant à la fois de polyarthrite rhumatoïde et d'une maladie cardiovasculaire ou rénale.

Objectifs

Évaluer et colliger systématiquement les données scientifiques sur l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'utilisation de traitements antalgiques pharmacologiques chez les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde avec comorbidité cardiovasculaire ou rénale.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, numéro 4);MEDLINE, à partir de 1950 ; EMBASE, à partir de 1980 ; la Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) et la Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Nous avons également recherché manuellement dans les publications du congrès de l'American College of Rheumatology (ACR) et de la Ligue européenne contre le rhumatisme (EULAR) pour 2008-09, et consulté les sites internet des organismes de réglementation concernant les événements indésirables signalés, les indications et les mises en garde.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons considéré les essais contrôlés randomisés et les études non randomisées comparant l'efficacité et l'innocuité des traitements antalgiques pharmacologiques chez les patients atteints de polyarthrite rhumatoïde, avec et sans comorbidité cardiovasculaire ou rénale.

De plus, nous avons également considéré les études contrôlées avant-après, les séries chronologiques, les études de cohorte et les études cas-témoins ainsi que les séries de cas (N>20) pour évaluer l'innocuité.

Aux fins de cette revue, nous avons défini les traitements antalgiques pharmacologiques comme comprenant les analgésiques simples (comme le paracétamol), les anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS), les opiacés et les opioïdes (comme le tramadol) et les neuromodulateurs (y compris les antidépresseurs, les anticonvulsivants et les myorelaxants).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué les résultats de la recherche et devaient extraire les données et évaluer le risque de biais des études incluses.

Résultats principaux

Nous n'avons identifié aucune étude répondant à nos critères d'inclusion. Beaucoup d'essais portant sur des AINS excluaient explicitement les patients présentant une comorbidité cardiovasculaire ou rénale.

Nous avons identifié un essai qui rapportait des données sur des populations mixtes (comprenant à la fois polyarthrite rhumatoïde et arthrose) prenant soit du diclofénac soit de l'étoricoxib. Dans cette étude, la présence d'une maladie cardiovasculaire augmentait d'un facteur trois la probabilité d'un nouvel accident cardio-vasculaire. Les patients avec au moins deux comorbidités cardiovasculaires présentaient une probabilité deux fois plus élevée d'accident cardiovasculaire.

Conclusions des auteurs

Aucune étude ne comparait spécifiquement l'efficacité et l'innocuité des traitements antalgiques pharmacologiques chez les patients atteints de polyarthrite rhumatoïde, avec et sans comorbidité cardiovasculaire ou rénale. .

En l'absence de preuves spécifiques concernant la polyarthrite rhumatoïde, les recommandations actuelles préconisent la prudence dans l'utilisation des AINS chez les personnes atteintes de polyarthrite rhumatoïde en général et soulignent la nécessité d'une vigilance accrue chez les patients souffrant d'une maladie cardiovasculaire ou risquant d'en développer une. Les recommandations actuelles concernant l'utilisation des AINS et des opioïdes en cas d'insuffisance rénale modérée à sévère, devraient également être appliquées aux personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde.

Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour guider les cliniciens dans le traitement des douleurs de la polyarthrite rhumatoïde.

Plain language summary

Pain management for rheumatoid arthritis with cardiovascular or renal comorbidity

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the safety of using pain-relieving drugs in people with rheumatoid arthritis who also have either heart or kidney disease, or both.

What is rheumatoid arthritis and what is pain management?

When you have rheumatoid arthritis, your immune system, which normally fights infection, inflames the lining of your joints making them painful, stiff and swollen. People with rheumatoid arthritis often need to use painkillers and anti-inflammatories such as paracetamol or ibuprofen to control this pain and inflammation.

Pain can be managed with several drugs including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), (e.g. ibuprofen, diclofenac and COX-2s (e.g. celecoxib)); opioids and opioid-like drugs (e.g. tramadol, morphine and others), paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen), and neuromodulators (including anti-depressants, anti-convulsants, and muscle relaxants).

The review shows that in people with rheumatoid arthritis and heart or kidney problems:

We do not have precise information about side effects and complications because no studies were found that looked at side effects of pain drugs in these people. There are well documented side effects with many commonly used pain medications such as stomach, kidney and heart problems associated with NSAID use, and gastrointestinal problems associated with the use of opioids.

Résumé simplifié

Prise en charge de la douleur dans la polyarthrite rhumatoïde avec comorbidité cardio-vasculaire ou rénale

Ce résumé de revue Cochrane présente ce que nous savons de la recherche sur la sécurité d'utilisation de médicaments antidouleur chez les personnes atteintes de polyarthrite rhumatoïde souffrant aussi d'une maladie cardiaque ou rénale, ou des deux.

Qu'est-ce que la polyarthrite rhumatoïde et qu'entend-on par gestion de la douleur?

Lorsque vous souffrez de polyarthrite rhumatoïde, votre système immunitaire, qui combat normalement les infections, enflamme la muqueuse de vos articulations, les rendant douloureuses, raides et gonflées. Les personnes atteintes de polyarthrite rhumatoïde ont souvent besoin d'utiliser des analgésiques et des anti-inflammatoires tels que le paracétamol ou l'ibuprofène pour calmer cette douleur et cette inflammation.

La douleur peut être gérée avec plusieurs médicaments, dont les anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS) (par ex. ibuprofène, diclofénac et les COX-2 (comme le célécoxib)), les opiacés et les opioïdes (par ex. tramadol, morphine et autres), le paracétamol (aussi connu sous le nom d'acétaminophène) et les neuromodulateurs (y compris les antidépresseurs, les anticonvulsivants et les myorelaxants)..

La revue montre que chez les personnes souffrant de polyarthrite rhumatoïde et de problèmes cardiaques ou rénaux :

Nous n'avons pas d'informations précises sur les effets secondaires et les complications, car nous n'avons trouvé aucune étude qui ait examiné les effets secondaires des médicaments antidouleur chez ces personnes. Il y a des effets secondaires bien documentés concernant de nombreux médicaments antidouleur couramment utilisés, comme les problèmes stomacaux, rénaux et cardiaques associés à l'utilisation des AINS, et les problèmes gastro-intestinaux associés à l'utilisation des opioïdes.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st November, 2011
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

Laički sažetak

Liječenje boli u pacijenata koji boluju od reumatoidnog artritisa, a ujedno pate od srčano-žilnih ili bubrežnih bolesti

Ovaj sažetak Cochrane sustavnog pregleda literature prikazuje dokaze iz kliničkih pokusa u kojima je ispitana sigurnost lijekova za ublažavanje boli u osoba koje pate od reumatoidnog artritisa, a ujedno imaju i bolest srca ili bubrega, ili oboje.

Što je reumatoidni artritis i što je ublažavanje boli?

Reumatoidni artritis je bolest u kojoj imunološki sustav, koji se u zdravog čovjeka bori protiv infekcije, napada ovojnice vlastitih zglobova, zbog čega zglobovi postaju bolni, ukočeni i otečeni. Oboljeli od reumatoidnog artritisa često trebaju uzeti lijekove protiv boli i protuupalne lijekove kao što su paracetamol ili ibuprofen kako bi kontrolirali tu bol i upalu.

Bol se može liječiti nizom lijekova, kao što su nesteroidni protuupalni lijekovi (NSPUL) (npr. ibuprofen, dikofenak) i inhibitori COX-2 kao što je celecoksib, zatim opioidi i lijekovi nalik na opioide (npr. tramadol, morfin i ostali), paracetamol (acetaminofen) i neuromodulatori (uključujući anti-depresive, anti-konvulzive i miorelaksanse - lijekove za opuštanje mišića).

Ovaj Cochrane sustavni pregled pokazuje da u osoba koje pate od reumatoidnog artritisa, i problema sa srcem ili bubrezima:

Nemamo precizne informacije o nuspojavama i komplikacijama jer niti jedna studija koja je pronađena nije istražila nuspojave lijekova protiv bolova u takvih pacijenata. Postoje dobro dokumentirane nuspojave za brojne lijekove protiv boli, kao što su problemi sa želucem, bubrezima i srcem ako se uzimaju NSPUL, zatim probavni problemi povezani s uporabom opioida.

Bilješke prijevoda

Hrvatski Cochrane
Prevela: Livia Puljak
Ovaj sažetak preveden je u okviru volonterskog projekta prevođenja Cochrane sažetaka. Uključite se u projekt i pomozite nam u prevođenju brojnih preostalih Cochrane sažetaka koji su još uvijek dostupni samo na engleskom jeziku. Kontakt: cochrane_croatia@mefst.hr

Get access to the full text of this article