Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Home fortification of foods with multiple micronutrient powders for health and nutrition in children under two years of age

  1. Luz Maria De-Regil1,*,
  2. Parminder S Suchdev2,
  3. Gunn E Vist3,
  4. Silke Walleser4,
  5. Juan Pablo Peña-Rosas5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 7 SEP 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008959.pub2


How to Cite

De-Regil LM, Suchdev PS, Vist GE, Walleser S, Peña-Rosas JP. Home fortification of foods with multiple micronutrient powders for health and nutrition in children under two years of age. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD008959. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008959.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Micronutrient Initiative, Ottawa, ON, Canada

  2. 2

    Emory University; Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), Pediatrics and Global Health; Nutrition Branch, Atlanta, GA, USA

  3. 3

    Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Prevention, Health Promotion and Organisation Unit, Oslo, Norway

  4. 4

    Independent Consultant, Geneva, Switzerland

  5. 5

    World Health Organization, Evidence and Programme Guidance, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, Geneva, Switzerland

*Luz Maria De-Regil, Micronutrient Initiative, 180 Elgin Street, Suite 1000, Ottawa, ON, K2P 2K3, Canada. lderegil@micronutrient.org.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions), comment added to review
  2. Published Online: 7 SEP 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Vitamin and mineral deficiencies, particularly those of iron, vitamin A and zinc, affect more than two billion people worldwide. Young children are highly vulnerable because of rapid growth and inadequate dietary practices. Micronutrient powders (MNP) are single-dose packets containing multiple vitamins and minerals in powder form that can be sprinkled onto any semi-solid food.The use of MNP for home or point-of-use fortification of complementary foods has been proposed as an intervention for improving micronutrient intake in children under two years of age.

Objectives

To assess the effects and safety of home (point-of-use) fortification of foods with multiple micronutrient powders on nutritional, health and developmental outcomes in children under two years of age.

Search methods

We searched the following databases in February 2011: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (1948 to week 2 February 2011), EMBASE (1980 to Week 6 2011), CINAHL (1937 to current), CPCI-S (1990 to 19 February 2011), Science Citation Index (1970 to 19 February 2011), African Index Medicus (searched 23 February 2011), POPLINE (searched 21 February 2011), ClinicalTrials.gov (searched 23 February 2011), mRCT (searched 23 February 2011), and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (searched 23 February 2011). We also contacted relevant organisations (25 January 2011) for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomised and quasi-randomised trials with either individual or cluster randomisation. Participants were children under the age of two years at the time of intervention, with no specific health problems. The intervention was consumption of food fortified at the point of use with multiple micronutrient powders formulated with at least iron, zinc and vitamin A compared with placebo, no intervention or the use of iron containing supplements, which is the standard practice.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of studies against the inclusion criteria, extracted data from included studies and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies.

Main results

We included eight trials (3748 participants) conducted in low income countries in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, where anaemia is a public health problem. The interventions lasted between two and 12 months and the powder formulations contained between five and 15 nutrients. Six trials compared the use of MNP versus no intervention or a placebo and the other two compared the use of MNP versus daily iron drops. Most of the included trials were assessed as at low risk of bias.

Home fortification with MNP reduced anaemia by 31% (six trials, RR 0.69; 95% CI 0.60 to 0.78) and iron deficiency by 51% (four trials, RR 0.49; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.67) in infants and young children when compared with no intervention or placebo, but we did not find an effect on growth.

In comparison with daily iron supplementation, the use of MNP produced similar results on anaemia (one trial, RR 0.89; 95% CI 0.58 to 1.39) and haemoglobin concentrations (two trials, MD -2.36 g/L; 95% CI -10.30 to 5.58); however, given the limited amount of data these results should be interpreted cautiously.

No deaths were reported in the trials and information on side effects and morbidity, including malaria, was scarce.

It seems that the use of MNP is efficacious among infants and young children six to 23 months of age living in settings with different prevalences of anaemia and malaria endemicity, regardless of whether the intervention lasts two, six or 12 months or whether recipients are male or female.

Authors' conclusions

Home fortification of foods with multiple micronutrient powders is an effective intervention to reduce anaemia and iron deficiency in children six months to 23 months of age. The provision of MNP is better than no intervention or placebo and possibly comparable to commonly used daily iron supplementation. The benefits of this intervention as a child survival strategy or on developmental outcomes are unclear. Data on effects on malaria outcomes are lacking and further investigation of morbidity outcomes is needed. The micronutrient powders containing multiple nutrients are well accepted but adherence is variable and in some cases comparable to that achieved in infants and young children receiving standard iron supplements as drops or syrups.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Use of a powder mix of vitamins and minerals to fortify complementary foods immediately before consumption and improve health and nutrition in children under two years of age

Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals, particularly of iron, vitamin A and zinc, affect approximately half of the infants and young children under two years of age worldwide. Exclusive breastfeeding until six months of age and continued breastfeeding for at least two years are recommended to maintain children's adequate health and nutrition. After six months of age, infants start receiving semi-solid foods but the amount of vitamins and minerals can be insufficient to fulfil all the requirements of the growing baby. Micronutrient powders (MNP) are single-dose packets of powder containing iron, vitamin A, zinc and other vitamins and minerals that can be sprinkled onto any semi-solid food at home or at any other point of use to increase the content of essential nutrients in the infant's diet during this period. This is done without changing the usual baby diet.

This review includes eight good quality trials that involved 3748 infants and young children from low income countries in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. We found that a variety of MNP formulations containing between five and 15 vitamins and minerals have been given for between two and 12 months to infants and young children aged six to 23 months of age.

The use of MNP containing at least iron, zinc and vitamin A for home fortification of foods was associated with a reduced risk of anaemia and iron deficiency in children under two. The studies did not find any effects on growth. Although the acceptability of this innovative intervention was high, there is no additional benefit to usually recommended iron drops or syrups, however few studies compared these different interventions. No deaths were reported in the trials and information on side effects and morbidity, including malaria, was scarce. The use of MNP was beneficial for male and female infants and young children six to 23 months of age, independent of whether they lived in settings with different anaemia and malaria backgrounds or whether the intervention was provided for two, six or 12 months. The most appropriate arrangements for use (daily or intermittently), the appropriate vitamin and mineral composition of the mix of powders and the way to deliver this intervention effectively in public health programmes to address multiple micronutrient deficiencies remain unclear.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Enrichissement de l'alimentation à domicile à l'aide de poudres de micronutriments multiples pour améliorer la santé et la nutrition des enfants de moins de deux ans

Contexte

Les carences en vitamines et minéraux, spécialement en fer, vitamine A et zinc, touchent plus de deux milliards de personnes à travers le monde. Les jeunes enfants sont très vulnérables en raison d'une croissance rapide et de pratiques diététiques inadéquates. Les poudres de micronutriments (PMN) sont des sachets unidose contenant de multiples vitamines et minéraux sous forme de poudre pouvant être saupoudrée sur tous les aliments semi-solides. L'utilisation de PMN à domicile ou au point d'utilisation pour l'enrichissement des aliments de complément a été proposée en vue d'améliorer l'apport en micronutriments chez les enfants de moins de deux ans.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets et l'innocuité de l'enrichissement des aliments à domicile (point d'utilisation) à l'aide de poudres de micronutriments multiples sur les résultats nutritionnels, cliniques et développementaux des enfants de moins de deux ans.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En février 2011, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes : Le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (Bibliothèque Cochrane), MEDLINE (1948 à la 2ème semaine de février 2011), EMBASE (1980 à la semaine 6 de 2011), CINAHL (1937 jusqu'à nos jours), CPCI-S (1990 jusqu'au 19 février 2011), Science Citation Index (1970 au 19 février 2011), African Index Medicus (recherche effectuée le 23 février 2011), POPLINE (recherche effectuée le 21 février 2011), ClinicalTrials.gov (recherche effectuée le 23 février 2011), mRCT (recherche effectuée le 23 février 2011), et le système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé (ICTRP pour International Clinical Trials Registry Platform) (recherche effectuée le 23 février 2011). Nous avons également contacté des organisations pertinentes (25 janvier 2011) afin d'identifier des études en cours et non publiées.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais randomisés et quasi-randomisés avec randomisation individuelle ou en grappes. Les participants étaient des enfants sans problèmes de santé spécifiques âgés de moins de deux ans au moment de l'intervention. L'intervention consistait en un enrichissement de l'alimentation au point d'utilisation à l'aide de poudres de micronutriments multiples contenant, au minimum, du fer, du zinc et de la vitamine A par rapport à un placebo, à une absence d'intervention ou à l'utilisation de suppléments contenant du fer (pratique standard).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de revue ont évalué de manière indépendante l'éligibilité des études au regard des critères d'inclusion, extrait les données des études incluses et évalué le risque de biais.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus huit essais (3 748 participants) réalisés dans des pays à faibles revenus d'Asie, d'Afrique et des Caraïbes, où l'anémie est un problème de santé publique. Ces interventions duraient de 2 à 12 mois, et les poudres présentaient différentes formulations contenant entre 5 et 15 nutriments. Six essais comparaient l'utilisation de PMN à une absence d'intervention ou à un placebo, et les deux autres comparaient l'utilisation de PMN à des gouttes de fer administrées quotidiennement. La plupart des essais inclus présentaient un faible risque de biais.

L'enrichissement à domicile à l'aide de PMN réduisait l'anémie de 31 % (six essais, RR de 0,69 ; IC à 95 %, entre 0,60 et 0,78) et la carence en fer de 51 % (quatre essais, RR de 0,49 ; IC à 95 %, entre 0,35 et 0,67) chez les nourrissons et les jeunes enfants par rapport à une absence d'intervention ou à un placebo, mais nous n'avons identifié aucun effet sur la croissance.

L'utilisation de PMN produisait des résultats similaires à une supplémentation quotidienne en fer en termes d'anémie (un essai, RR de 0,89 ; IC à 95 %, entre 0,58 et 1,39) et de concentrations d'hémoglobine (deux essais, DM de -2,36 g/l ; IC à 95% entre -10,30 et 5,58) ; néanmoins, compte tenu de la quantité de données limitée, ces résultats devraient être interprétés avec précaution.

Aucun décès n'était rapporté dans les essais, et peu d'informations étaient disponibles concernant les effets secondaires et la morbidité, y compris le paludisme.

L'utilisation de PMN semble efficace chez les nourrissons et les jeunes enfants de 6 à 23 mois dans des environnements présentant différentes prévalences en termes d'anémie et d'endémicité du paludisme, indépendamment de la durée de l'intervention (deux, six ou douze mois) ou du sexe des participants.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'enrichissement de l'alimentation à domicile à l'aide de poudres de micronutriments multiples est efficace pour réduire l'anémie et la carence en fer chez les enfants de 6 à 23 mois. L'administration de PMN est plus efficace qu'une absence d'intervention ou un placebo, et est probablement comparable à une supplémentation en fer administrée quotidiennement (traitement standard). Les bénéfices de cette intervention en termes de survie des enfants ou de résultats du développement ne sont pas clairement établis. Aucune donnée n'est disponible concernant les effets de l'intervention sur les résultats du paludisme, et d'autres recherches sont nécessaires concernant les résultats de la morbidité. Les poudres de micronutriments contenant des nutriments multiples sont bien acceptées, mais l'observance du traitement est variable et, dans certains cas, comparable à celle obtenue chez des nourrissons et de jeunes enfants recevant des suppléments en fer standard sous forme de gouttes ou de sirop.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Enrichissement de l'alimentation à domicile à l'aide de poudres de micronutriments multiples pour améliorer la santé et la nutrition des enfants de moins de deux ans

Utilisation d'une poudre contenant un mélange de vitamines et de minéraux pour enrichir les aliments de complément tout de suite avant la consommation afin d'améliorer la santé et la nutrition des enfants de moins de deux ans

Les carences en vitamines et minéraux, en particulier le fer, la vitamine A et le zinc, affectent environ la moitié des nourrissons et des jeunes enfants de moins de deux ans partout dans le monde. L'allaitement exclusif jusqu'à l'âge de six mois et la poursuite de l'allaitement pendant au moins deux ans sont recommandés pour maintenir une bonne santé et un état nutritionnel approprié. Après six mois, les nourrissons commencent à recevoir des aliments semi-solides, mais la quantité de vitamines et de minéraux n'est pas toujours suffisante pour répondre à tous les besoins d'un bébé en pleine croissance.Les poudres de micronutriments (PMN) sont des sachets unidose de poudre contenant du fer, de la vitamine A, du zinc et d'autres vitamines et minéraux qui peuvent être saupoudrées sur les aliments semi-solides à domicile ou ailleurs afin d'enrichir l'alimentation de l'enfant en nutriments essentiels durant cette période. Ces poudres peuvent être administrées sans modifier le régime habituel du bébé.

Cette revue inclut huit essais de bonne qualité portant sur 3 748 nourrissons et jeunes enfants de pays à faibles revenus d'Asie, d'Afrique et des Caraïbes. Nous avons identifié différentes formulations de PMN contenant entre 5 et 15 vitamines et minéraux, administrées pendant deux à douze mois chez des nourrissons et de jeunes enfants âgés de 6 à 23 mois.

L'enrichissement de l'alimentation à domicile à l'aide de PMN contenant, au minimum, du fer, du zinc et de la vitamine A était associée à une réduction du risque d'anémie et de carence en fer chez les enfants de moins de deux ans. Les études n'observaient aucun effet sur la croissance. Bien que cette intervention innovante présente une acceptabilité élevée, elle ne confère aucun bénéfice supplémentaire par rapport aux gouttes et sirops de fer généralement recommandés ; néanmoins, peu d'études comparaient ces différentes interventions. Aucun décès n'était rapporté dans les essais, et peu d'informations étaient disponibles concernant les effets secondaires et la morbidité, y compris le paludisme. L'utilisation de PMN était bénéfique chez les nourrissons et jeunes enfants des deux sexes âgés de 6 à 23 mois, indépendamment du contexte de leur pays en termes d'anémie et de paludisme ou de la durée de l'intervention (deux, six ou douze mois). La posologie la plus appropriée (quotidienne ou intermittente), le contenu optimal en vitamines et minéraux du mélange de poudres et la mise en œuvre la plus efficace de cette intervention dans le cadre des programmes de santé publique visant à combler les carences en micronutriments multiples ne sont pas clairement établis.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.