Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Antibiotic and other lock treatments for tunnelled central venous catheter-related infections in children with cancer

  1. Reineke A Schoot1,*,
  2. Elvira C van Dalen1,
  3. Cornelia H van Ommen2,
  4. Marianne D van de Wetering1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Childhood Cancer Group

Published Online: 25 JUN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 28 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008975.pub2


How to Cite

Schoot RA, van Dalen EC, van Ommen CH, van de Wetering MD. Antibiotic and other lock treatments for tunnelled central venous catheter-related infections in children with cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD008975. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008975.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Emma Children's Hospital / Academic Medical Center, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  2. 2

    Emma Children's Hospital / Academic Medical Center, Department of Paediatric Haematology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

*Reineke A Schoot, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital / Academic Medical Center, PO Box 22660, Amsterdam, 1100 DD, Netherlands. r.a.schoot@amc.uva.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 25 JUN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The risk of developing a tunnelled central venous catheter (CVC)-related infection ranges between 0.1 and 2.3 per 1000 catheter days for children with cancer. These infections are difficult to treat with systemic antibiotics (salvage rate 24% - 66%) due to biofilm formation in the CVC. Lock treatments can achieve 100 - 1000 times higher concentrations locally without exposure to high systemic concentrations.

Objectives

Our objective was to investigate the efficacy of antibiotic and other lock treatments in the treatment of CVC-related infections in children with cancer compared to a control intervention. We also assessed adverse events of lock treatments.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, issue 3, 2011), MEDLINE/PubMed (1945 to August 2011) and EMBASE/Ovid (1980 to August 2011). In addition we searched reference lists from relevant articles and the conference proceedings of the International Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) (from 2006 to 2010), American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) (from 2006 to 2010), the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) (from 2006 to 2011), the American Society of Hematology (ASH) (from 2006 to 2010) and the International Society of Thrombosis and Haematology (ISTH) (from 2006 to 2011). We scanned the ISRCTN Register and the National Institute of Health Register for ongoing trials (www.controlled-trials.com) (August 2011).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing an antibiotic lock or other lock treatment (with or without concomitant systemic antibiotics) with a control intervention (other lock treatment with or without concomitant systemic antibiotics or systemic antibiotics alone) for the treatment of CVC-related infections in children with cancer. For the description of adverse events, cohort studies were also eligible for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and performed 'Risk of bias' assessments of included studies. Analyses were performed according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions.

Main results

Two RCTs evaluated urokinase lock treatment with concomitant systemic antibiotics (n = 56) versus systemic antibiotics alone (n = 48), and one CCT evaluated ethanol lock treatment with concomitant systemic antibiotics (n = 15) versus systemic antibiotics alone (n = 13). No RCTs or CCTs evaluating antibiotic lock treatments were identified. All studies had methodological limitations and clinical heterogeneity between studies was present. We found no evidence of significant difference between ethanol or urokinase lock treatments with concomitant systemic antibiotics and systemic antibiotics alone regarding the number of participants cured, the number of recurrent CVC-related infections, the number of days until the first negative blood culture, the number of CVCs prematurely removed, ICU admission and sepsis. Not all studies were included in all analyses. No adverse events occurred in the five publications of cohort studies (one cohort was included in two publications) assessing this outcome; CVC malfunctioning occurred in three out of five publications of cohort studies assessing this outcome.

Authors' conclusions

No significant effect of urokinase or ethanol lock in addition to systemic antibiotics was found. However, this could be due to low power or a too-short follow-up. The cohort studies identified no adverse events; some cohort studies reported CVC malfunctioning. No RCTs or CCTs were published on antibiotic lock treatment alone. More well-designed RCTs are needed to further explore the effect of antibiotic or other lock treatments in the treatment of CVC-related infections in children with cancer.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Catheter lock treatments for catheter-related infections in children with cancer

Oncology patients require frequent venous access for their cancer treatment. Therefore, more permanent catheters (central venous catheters (CVCs)) are often inserted. However, these can become infected and once the CVC becomes occupied by bacteria it is difficult to eradicate these micro-organisms. Lock solutions are medicines that are placed in the CVC and left to dwell for a certain time period. These locks only treat the CVC and high concentrations can be achieved. In this review we investigated the effect of lock treatments on CVC-related infections. We identified three studies: two investigating the effect of urokinase lock treatments in addition to antibiotics and one study investigating the effect of ethanol locks in addition to antibiotics. We could detect no effect of urokinase or ethanol locks. However, the groups were very small. A similar study with a larger participant population might have different results.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitements antibiotiques et autres traitements par verrou contre les infections liées aux cathéters veineux centraux tunnelisés chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer

Contexte

Le risque de développement d'une infection liée au cathéter veineux central (CVC) tunnelisé s'établit entre 0,1 et 2,3 pour 1 000 jours de cathéter pour les enfants atteints d'un cancer. Ces infections sont difficiles à traiter avec des antibiotiques systémiques (taux de sauvetage 24 % - 66 %) en raison de la formation d'un biofilm dans le CVC. Les traitements par verrou peuvent localement atteindre des concentrations 100 - 1 000 fois supérieures sans exposition à de fortes concentrations systémiques.

Objectifs

Notre objectif était d'étudier l'efficacité des traitements antibiotiques et autres traitements par verrou contre les infections liées aux CVC chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer comparé à une intervention de contrôle. Nous avons également évalué les événements indésirables des traitements par verrou.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, numéro 3, 2011), MEDLINE/PubMed (de 1945 à août 2011) et EMBASE/Ovid (de 1980 à août 2011). De plus, nous avons consulté les bibliographies des articles pertinents et les actes de conférence de l'International Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) (de 2006 à 2010), de l'American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) (de 2006 à 2010), de la Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) (de 2006 à 2011), de l'American Society of Hematology (ASH) (de 2006 à 2010) et de l'International Society of Thrombosis and Haematology (ISTH) (de 2006 à 2011). Nous avons passé au crible le registre ISRCTN et le registre National Institute of Health pour trouver des essais en cours (www.controlled-trials.com) (août 2011).

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et les essais cliniques contrôlés (ECC) comparant un verrou antibiotique ou un autre traitement par verrou (avec ou sans antibiotiques systémiques concomitants) à une intervention de contrôle (autre traitement par verrou avec ou sans antibiotiques systémiques concomitants ou antibiotiques systémiques seuls) pour le traitement des infections liées aux CVC chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer. Pour la description des événements indésirables, les études de cohorte étaient également éligibles à l'inclusion.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de façon indépendante, sélectionné les études, extrait les données et procédé à des évaluations du « risque de biais » des études incluses. Des analyses ont été effectuées conformément aux instructions du guide Cochrane sur les revues systématiques des interventions (Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions).

Résultats Principaux

Deux ECR évaluaient le traitement par verrou d'urokinase avec antibiotiques systémiques concomitants (n = 56) versus antibiotiques systémiques seuls (n = 48) et un ECC évaluait le traitement par verrou d'éthanol avec antibiotiques systémiques concomitants (n = 15) versus antibiotiques systémiques seuls (n = 13). Aucun ECR ni aucun ECC évaluant les traitements par verrou d'antibiotiques n'a été identifié. Toutes les études présentaient des limites méthodologiques et on a constaté une hétérogénéité clinique entre les études. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve d'une différence significative entre les traitements par verrou d'éthanol ou d'urokinase avec antibiotiques systémiques concomitants et les antibiotiques systémiques seuls concernant le nombre de participants soignés, le nombre d'infections récurrentes liées aux CVC, le nombre de jours jusqu'à la première hémoculture négative, le nombre de CVC retirés prématurément, l'admission en USI et le sepsis. Toutes les études n'ont pas été incluses dans toutes les analyses. Aucun événement indésirable n'est survenu dans les cinq publications d'études de cohorte (une cohorte a été incluse dans deux publications) évaluant ce critère de jugement ; un dysfonctionnement d'un CVC est survenu dans trois publications d'études de cohorte sur cinq évaluant ce critère de jugement.

Conclusions des auteurs

Aucun effet significatif du verrou d'urokinase ou d'éthanol en plus des antibiotiques systémiques n'a été constaté. Cependant, cela pourrait être dû à une faible puissance ou à un suivi trop court. Les études de cohorte n'ont identifié aucun événement indésirable ; certaines études de cohorte ont rapporté un dysfonctionnement des CVC. Aucun ECR ni aucun ECC n'a été publié sur le traitement par verrou d'antibiotiques seul. D'autres ECR bien conçus doivent être réalisés pour explorer davantage l'effet des traitements antibiotiques ou d'autres traitements par verrou contre les infections liées aux CVC chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitements antibiotiques et autres traitements par verrou contre les infections liées aux cathéters veineux centraux tunnelisés chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer

Traitements par verrou des cathéters contre les infections liées aux cathéters chez des enfants atteints d'un cancer

Les patients en oncologie ont besoin d'un accès veineux fréquent pour leur traitement anticancéreux. Par conséquent, des cathéters plus permanents (cathéters veineux centraux (CVC)) sont souvent insérés. Cependant, ils peuvent s'infecter et lorsque le CVC est envahi par des bactéries, il est difficile d'éradiquer ces micro-organismes. Les solutions de verrou sont des médicaments qui sont placés dans le CVC et y sont laissés pendant une certaine période. Ces verrous ne traitent que le CVC et d'importantes concentrations peuvent être atteintes. Dans cette revue, nous avons étudié l'effet des traitements par verrou sur les infections liées aux CVC. Nous avons identifié trois études : deux examinaient l'effet de traitements par verrou d'urokinase en plus d'antibiotiques et une étude examinait l'effet de verrous d'éthanol en plus d'antibiotiques. Nous n'avons pu détecter aucun effet concernant les verrous d'urokinase ou d'éthanol. Cependant, les groupes étaient de très petite taille. Une étude semblable avec une plus grande population de participants pourrait donner des résultats différents.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 7th August, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.