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Postpartum misoprostol for preventing maternal mortality and morbidity

  1. G Justus Hofmeyr1,*,
  2. A Metin Gülmezoglu2,
  3. Natalia Novikova3,
  4. Theresa A Lawrie4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 15 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 2 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008982.pub2


How to Cite

Hofmeyr GJ, Gülmezoglu AM, Novikova N, Lawrie TA. Postpartum misoprostol for preventing maternal mortality and morbidity. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD008982. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008982.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of the Witwatersrand, University of Fort Hare, Eastern Cape Department of Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East London Hospital Complex, East London, Eastern Cape, South Africa

  2. 2

    World Health Organization, UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, Geneva, Switzerland

  3. 3

    Walter Sisulu University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East London Hospital Complex, East London, South Africa

  4. 4

    Royal United Hospital, The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group, Bath, UK

*G Justus Hofmeyr, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East London Hospital Complex, University of the Witwatersrand, University of Fort Hare, Eastern Cape Department of Health, Frere and Cecilia Makiwane Hospitals, Private Bag X 9047, East London, Eastern Cape, 5200, South Africa. justhof@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 15 JUL 2013

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Background

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms
 

Description of the condition

The primary objective of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH; bleeding after childbirth) prevention and treatment is to reduce maternal deaths. Because mortality is generally too infrequent to be measured in randomised trials, blood loss is used as a surrogate outcome.

The postpartum period, also known as the puerperium, begins with the birth of the baby and placenta and ends six weeks after birth. Maternal mortality includes the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to, or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management, but not from accidental or incidental causes (AbouZahar 2003). Maternal morbidity, which is investigated in this review, includes major surgery (laparotomy, uterine artery ligation, internal iliac artery ligation, B-Lynch suture, hysterectomy, extensive vaginal repair), admission to the intensive care unit, vital organ failure (transient or permanent), and severe pyrexia (body temperature above 40ºC).

This review will focus only on maternal mortality and severe morbidity associated with the use of misoprostol for prevention and treatment of PPH. Other outcomes such as PPH and side-effects have been reviewed previously (Hofmeyr 2009), and are covered in The Cochrane Library by the reviews of prostaglandins for preventing PPH (Tuncalp 2012), and treatments for PPH (Mousa 2007). For this reason, PPH will not be reported on in this review.

The majority of trials on misoprostol were performed in low-income countries where PPH is more common in comparison to high-income countries. Maternal mortality is also much higher in low-income countries. Although the impact of this review will be more significant for low-income countries with a high incidence of PPH and maternal mortality, it is also important for high-income countries where misoprostol is commonly used for treatment of PPH.

 

Description of the intervention

Misoprostol is one of several uterotonic agents used for the prevention and treatment of PPH. It is an inexpensive and stable prostaglandin E1 analogue, and has been shown to stimulate uterine contractility in pregnancy (Norman 1991). Administered orally or vaginally, it is effective for induction of abortion and of labour, though it poses certain risks (Hofmeyr 1998).

Misoprostol has the major public health advantage over less stable, injectable medication such as oxytocin that it can more easily be distributed at community level (Rajbhandari 2010). A recent Monte Carlo simulation depicting mortality and anaemia-related morbidity attributable to PPH estimated that community-based distribution of misoprostol for prevention of PPH would lower mortality by 81% and for treatment of PPH by 70% (Sutherland 2010). A systematic review of misoprostol distribution for use at home births found evidence of a reduction in PPH, but concluded that more robust evidence was needed (Hundley 2013).

Misoprostol gained popularity as a treatment for PPH in both low- and high-income countries on the basis of several uncontrolled observational studies showing dramatic effects.

While common sense suggests that reduced blood loss should translate to reduced mortality, this intuitive link is not necessarily straightforward. It would be possible for a treatment to reduce blood loss while having other adverse effects which increase mortality. A good example of such a counter-intuitive effect is class I antiarrhythmics, which reduce post-myocardial infarction arrhythmias, but double mortality (Echt 1991). Misoprostol has ubiquitous effects on many organ systems. It is, therefore, important to monitor the effects on overall mortality as for any new intervention promoted on the basis of surrogate outcomes.

This review includes studies of misoprostol by any route or in any dose used to prevent or treat PPH compared with either placebo or another uterotonic. Other uterotonics may include oxytocin, ergometrine, sulprostone or combinations.

 

How the intervention might work

Misoprostol has well-established uterotonic effects. Given after birth, it decreases PPH in certain circumstances, though less effectively than oxytocin (Tuncalp 2012). However, being a prostaglandin analogue, misoprostol has ubiquitous effects on many organ systems. Pyrexia and shivering are common, dose-related side-effects (Lumbiganon 1999). A systematic review found an overall five-fold increase in pyrexia with misoprostol, which was dose-related and greatest with the sublingual route and least with the rectal route (Elati 2012). Hyperpyrexia (body temperature of 40°C or more) is a serious adverse event which may be life-threatening (Chong 1997). Adverse cardiovascular events reported following the use of sulprostone (which was subsequently withdrawn from the market) for treatment of PPH may have been related to pulmonary artery vasoconstriction, an adverse effect also described with misoprostol (Qian 1994). A statistically significant decrease in heart rate with misoprostol has been reported, which might impair the cardiovascular compensation for blood loss postpartum (Brecht 1987). Thus, while misoprostol might reduce PPH, it is possible that adverse effects might compromise homoeostasis in the postpartum period. To date, there is no direct evidence from randomised trials that postpartum misoprostol reduces maternal mortality.

 

Why it is important to do this review

Misoprostol is being advocated for wide use in prevention and treatment of PPH (Smith 2013), and is recommended for such in certain settings by the World Health Orgnization (Smith 2013; Tang 2013), the Clinical Practice Obstetrics Committee; Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (Leduc 2009) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG 2006). The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Green-Top Guideline no 52 of 2009 (revised 2011), recommends misoprostol 1000 µg rectally for treatment of PPH when other interventions fail (RCOG 2009) (http://www.rcog.org.uk/files/rcog-corp/GT52PostpartumHaemorrhage0411.pdf). Guidance for the use of misoprostol for the prevention (FIGO 2012a) and treatment (FIGO 2012b) of PPH has been issued by the International Federation Of Gynecology And Obstetrics. Given the fact that misoprostol has been introduced into practice through opportunistic use by clinicians, a number of investigator-initiated randomised trials and recommendations from global organisations, rather than by a manufacturing company with responsibility for post-marketing surveillance, it is most important to prospectively monitor maternal deaths and severe morbidity in all randomised trials of postpartum misoprostol to determine the net impact of the beneficial effects, known adverse effects, as well as any unknown adverse effects. The Cochrane review on treatments for primary PPH recommends: "A system of "adverse event registration" should be used to identify serious maternal morbidity and mortality associated with the use of misoprostol in clinical practice." (Mousa 2007) This is important both for low-resource settings where misoprostol is being introduced on a large scale for routine use after childbirth, and for well-resourced settings where misoprostol is commonly used to treat PPH when other uterotonics fail. Currently, no Cochrane review can monitor all adverse outcomes in trials of misoprostol, because trials of prevention (Tuncalp 2012) and treatment (Mousa 2007) are considered in separate reviews.

 

Objectives

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms

To review maternal deaths and severe morbidity in all randomised trials of misoprostol for prevention or treatment of postpartum haemorrhage.

 

Methods

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms
 

Criteria for considering studies for this review

 

Types of studies

We included randomised controlled trials. We also planned to include cluster- and quasi-randomised trials in the analysis, as a very large number of women will be needed to obtain robust estimates of maternal mortality but we did not identify any for this version of the review. We will include trials reported only as abstracts if sufficient information is available from the abstract or from the authors.

 

Types of participants

Pregnant women ≥ 24 weeks' gestation who received misoprostol during the third stage of labour or in the postpartum period, versus placebo/no treatment or other uterotonics for prevention or treatment of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). We included studies conducted in women who delivered by caesarean section.

 

Types of interventions

A: Different doses and different routes (sublingual, oral, vaginal, rectal) of misoprostol used for prevention or treatment of PPH compared versus B: other uterotonics, other doses or routes, or placebo/no treatment. We included comparisons of misoprostol versus placebo/no treatment or other routes or dosages in women who received routine uterotonics (e.g. we included misoprostol plus routine uterotonics versus placebo plus routine uterotonics as misoprostol versus placebo).

We considered it important to include in a single analysis comparisons of misoprostol versus both placebo/no treatment and versus other uterotonics for the following reasons:

  1. The main objective of the review was to monitor unexpected adverse effects related to misoprostol use in the third stage of labour, which, if existent, would be expected to occur irrespective of the comparator.
  2. Because severe adverse effects and death are likely to be rare, all relevant randomised trials needed to be considered in a single analysis in order to have the power to detect such effects as early as possible.

 

Types of outcome measures

 

Primary outcomes

  1. Maternal death

 

Secondary outcomes

  1. Death or severe morbidity defined as any of the outcomes below.

  • 1.1 Major surgery (laparotomy, uterine artery ligation, internal iliac artery ligation, B-Lynch suture, hysterectomy, extensive vaginal repair)
  • 1.2 Admission to the intensive care unit
  • 1.3 Vital organ failure (temporary or permanent)
  • 1.4 Hyperpyrexia (body temperature ≥ 40ºC)

  1. 2. For dose comparisons, we also considered the outcome 'pyrexia ≥ 38°C'.

Because of the large number of women in the misoprostol groups with hyperpyrexia, we conducted a non-pre-specified analysis of maternal death or severe morbidity, excluding hyperpyrexia, to determine whether there were differences in morbidity from causes other than hyperpyrexia.

In a future update of the review, we will consider including another non-pre-specified analysis including blood transfusion as a component of severe morbidity.

 

Search methods for identification of studies

 

Electronic searches

We contacted the Trials Search Co-ordinator to search the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (11 January 2013). 

The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register is maintained by the Trials Search Co-ordinator and contains trials identified from:

  1. monthly searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL);
  2. weekly searches of MEDLINE;
  3. weekly searches of Embase;
  4. handsearches of 30 journals and the proceedings of major conferences;
  5. weekly current awareness alerts for a further 44 journals plus monthly BioMed Central email alerts.

Details of the search strategies for CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase, the list of handsearched journals and conference proceedings, and the list of journals reviewed via the current awareness service can be found in the ‘Specialized Register’ section within the editorial information about the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group. Trials identified through the searching activities described above are each assigned to a review topic (or topics). The Trials Search Co-ordinator searches the register for each review using the topic list rather than keywords. 

We did not apply any language restrictions.

 

Data collection and analysis

 

Selection of studies

Review author Tess Lawrie (TL) assessed for inclusion all the potential studies we identified as a result of the search strategy. We checked the selection against the selection made for a previous published version of the review (Hofmeyr 2009). For a subset of newer studies not assessed for the previous review, Justus Hofmeyr (GJH) repeated the assessment. We resolved any disagreement through discussion or, if required, we consulted Metin Gulmezoglu (AMG).

To the included studies, we allocated study identifiers which indicated the country (or countries) and date: misoprostol dosage in µg; route of misoprostol administration (PO = orally; SL = sublingually or buccally; PR = rectally); whether compared with a uterotonic ('U') or placebo ('P'), and whether used at caesarean section ('CS'); for example: 'Egypt 2009:800PR vs U'.

 

Data extraction and management

We designed a form to extract data. For eligible studies, TL extracted the data using the agreed form and compared these with the data extraction performed for the previous version of this review of (Hofmeyr 2009). For a subset of newer studies not assessed for the previous review, GJH performed a second data extraction. We resolved disagreements through discussion or, if required, we consulted AMG. We entered data into Review Manager software (RevMan 2011) and checked for accuracy. When information regarding any of the above was unclear or there were missing data, we attempted to contact authors of the original reports to provide further details.

 

Assessment of risk of bias in included studies

TL assessed risk of bias for each study using the criteria outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (Higgins 2011). See Appendix 1 for the 'Risk of bias' tool.

 

Measures of treatment effect

All review outcomes required dichotomous data only. We have presented most of the results of these data as summary risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For the outcome maternal mortality, we used both RRs and Peto odds ratios (ORs) to exclude discrepancies between the two summary statistics (results not shown).

 

Unit of analysis issues

The unit of analysis for all outcomes was the individual participant. We did not identify any cluster-randomised trials for this version of the review. For trials with more than two treatment groups, we extracted only the relevant pair-wise comparisons that included misoprostol. If misoprostol was compared at different doses with other uterotonics or placebo, we extracted the data for each misoprostol dose comparison separately and entered them separately into the meta-analyses. If misoprostol was compared with two or more other types of standard uterotonics, we combined all relevant control intervention groups into a single control group, such that, for dichotomous outcomes, both the sample sizes and the number of people with events were summed across groups.

 

Dealing with missing data

For included studies, we noted levels of attrition. For all outcomes, we carried out analyses, as far as possible, on an intention-to-treat basis, i.e. we attempted to include all participants randomised to each group in the analyses, and all participants were analysed in the group to which they were allocated, regardless of whether or not they received the allocated intervention. The denominator for each outcome in each trial was the number randomised minus any participants whose outcomes were known to be missing.

 

Assessment of heterogeneity

We assessed statistical heterogeneity in each meta-analysis using the T², I² and Chi² statistics. We regarded heterogeneity as substantial if the I² was greater than 30% and either the T² was greater than zero, or there was a low P value (less than 0.10) in the Chi² test for heterogeneity.

 

Assessment of reporting biases

If there were 10 or more studies in the meta-analysis, we investigated reporting biases (such as publication bias) using funnel plots. We assessed funnel plot asymmetry visually. If asymmetry was suggested by a visual assessment, we performed exploratory analyses to investigate it.

 

Data synthesis

We carried out statistical analysis using the Review Manager software (RevMan 2011). We used fixed-effect meta-analysis for combining data where it was reasonable to assume that studies were estimating the same underlying treatment effect: i.e. where trials were examining the same intervention, and the trials’ populations and methods were judged sufficiently similar. If there was clinical heterogeneity sufficient to expect that the underlying treatment effects differ between trials, or if substantial statistical heterogeneity was detected, we used random-effects meta-analysis to produce an overall summary if an average treatment effect across trials was considered clinically meaningful. The random-effects summary was treated as the average range of possible treatment effects and we discussed the clinical implications of treatment effects differing between trials. If the average treatment effect was not clinically meaningful, we did not combine trials. Where we used random-effects analyses, the results are presented as the average treatment effect with 95% CIs, and the estimates of T² and I².

 

Subgroup analysis and investigation of heterogeneity

If we identified substantial heterogeneity, we investigated it using subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses. We considered whether an overall summary was meaningful, and if it was, used random-effects analysis to produce it.

We carried out the following subgroup analyses.

  1. By type of comparator: misoprostol versus placebo/no treatment; misoprostol versus other uterotonics; comparator mixed or unclear.
  2. By indication for misoprostol use: misoprostol to treat PPH; misoprostol to prevent PPH; indication mixed or unclear.
  3. By dose of misoprostol: 600 µg or more; 400 µg or less; more than 400 µg to less than 600 µg; dose mixed or unclear.
  4. By dose and route of misoprostol administration: orally; sublingually; rectally; vaginally; route mixed or unclear. We subdivided each route by dosages as in (3) above.

We used the following outcomes in subgroup analysis: 'maternal mortality' and 'maternal mortality or severe morbidity'. In addition, we performed an exploratory subgroup analysis for the outcome 'pyrexia ≥ 38°C'. For random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses, we assessed differences between subgroups by inspection of the subgroups’ confidence intervals, non-overlapping confidence intervals indicated a statistically significant difference in treatment effect between the subgroups, and by formal tests of subgroup differences.

In future versions of this review, we plan to perform subgroup analyses by co-treatment with routine uterotonics in both groups as follows: routine uterotonics used; routine uterotonics not used; use of routine uterotonics mixed or unclear.

 

Sensitivity analysis

We performed sensitivity analysis to determine the effects of trial quality on results, by excluding trials of lower quality for the following outcomes: 'maternal mortality' and 'maternal mortality or severe morbidity'. No effects of trial quality on the results were found (data not shown).

 

Results

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms
 

Description of studies

 

Results of the search

We located 117 studies. We excluded 34, and four are awaiting classification due to awaiting translation (1), full text publication (2) or further information (1), see Studies awaiting classification.

 

Included studies

We included 78 studies (59,216 women); 71 postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) prevention studies and seven PPH treatment studies; 68 studies were conducted in women who underwent vaginal birth and 10 were conducted in women who underwent caesarean section. Misoprostol was compared to placebo (23), no additional treatment (2), other uterotonic agents (51) or uterotonic and placebo (2), at doses ranging from 50 µg to 1000 µg, via oral (35), sublingual (22), buccal (2), rectal (19), vaginal (1) and intrauterine routes (1).

Most of these studies reported side effects including fever, however several did not specifically report maternal morbidity and mortality data. For the initial WHO Bulletin version of the review, we obtained additional data from the authors of ten studies (Gambia 2004:600PO/SL vs P; Gambia 2005:600PO vs U; Guinea-B 2005:600SL vs P; India 2004a:400SL vs U; India 2005:600PO vs U; India 2005:600PO vs U; Nigeria 2003:600PO vs U; Turkey 2002:400PR vs P/U; WHO 1999:400/600PO vs U; Zim 2001:400PO vs U;). For the current review, we requested these additional data from contact authors of 24 studies and obtained them from the following (13): India 2012a:400SL vs U; India 2012b:400SL vs U; Spain 2009:400SL200PRvsN; Nigeria 2007:400PO vs U; Nigeria 2011:400SL vs P; Nigeria 2011:600PO vs U; Pakistan 2008:600SL vs P; Egypt 2009:800PR vs U; India 2009:400SL vs U; EEV 2010:800SL vs U; Egypt 2012b:CS400SL vs P; India 2010:CS800PR vs U; and India 2012:CS400SL vs P. No additional maternal deaths were identified through communication with the authors of these included trials. Several studies only contributed data relating to the incidence of fever, and three studies contributed no data (Bangla 2007:400PO vs U; China 2003:400PO vs N; Iran 2009:CS400SL vs U).

For more details see Characteristics of included studies.

 

Excluded studies

We excluded 34 studies. For details see Characteristics of excluded studies.

 

Risk of bias in included studies

See Figure 1.

 FigureFigure 1. 'Risk of bias' graph: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item presented as percentages across all included studies.

 

Allocation

The risk of allocation bias was considered low in 51 studies, unclear in 26 and high in one.

 

Blinding

The risk of performance bias and detection bias was considered low in 42 studies, unclear in 13 and high in 23.

 

Incomplete outcome data

The risk of attrition bias was considered low in 62 studies and unclear in 16.

 

Selective reporting

The risk of reporting bias was considered low in 65 studies, unclear in 12 and high in one.

 

Other potential sources of bias

The risk of other potential sources of bias was considered low in 62 studies and unclear in 16. Publication bias was assessed in funnel plots (Figure 2; Figure 3; Figure 4; Figure 5). Only for the outcome 'Pyrexia ≥ 38°C' was there some visual asymmetry (Figure 5).

 FigureFigure 2. Funnel plot of comparison: 1 Misoprostol versus control (placebo or uterotonic) subgrouped by comparator, outcome: 1.1 Maternal deaths.
 FigureFigure 3. Funnel plot of comparison: 1 Misoprostol versus control (placebo or uterotonic) subgrouped by comparator, outcome: 1.2 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity.
 FigureFigure 4. Funnel plot of comparison: 1 Misoprostol versus control (placebo or uterotonic) subgrouped by comparator, outcome: 1.4 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity excluding hyperpyrexia.
 FigureFigure 5. Funnel plot of comparison: 1 Misoprostol versus control (placebo or uterotonic) subgrouped by comparator, outcome: 1.5 Pyrexia ≥ 38°C.

 

Effects of interventions

 

Primary outcome: Maternal mortality

There was no statistically significant difference in maternal mortality with misoprostol compared to all control groups (31 studies; 11/19,715 (56/100,000) versus 4/20,076 deaths (20/100,000); risk ratio (RR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82 to 5.28;  Analysis 1.1), or for any of the comparison subgroups; however, point estimates favoured the comparison groups:

  • Misoprostol versus placebo: 10 studies, 6/4626 (130/100,000) versus 1/4707 (21/100,000); RR 2.70; 95% CI 0.72 to 10.11;  Analysis 1.1. Most of these deaths occurred in trials of treatment (three studies; 5/851 versus 0/870; RR 6.16; 95% CI 0.75 to 50.85;  Analysis 2.1).
  • Misoprostol versus other uterotonics: 21 studies, 5/15,089 (3/100,000) versus 3/15,369 (19/100,000); RR 1.54; 95% CI 0.40 to 5.92;  Analysis 1.1.

All maternal deaths occurred in studies evaluating misoprostol doses ≥ 600 µg versus controls ( Analysis 3.1). There was no statistically significant difference between these groups overall: 18 studies: 11/16,202 (68/100,000) versus 4/16,226 (25/100,000); RR 2.08; 95% CI 0.82 to 5.28;  Analysis 3.1. Maternal deaths occurred in studies using the oral, sublingual and mixed routes of administration. No deaths occurred in studies using misoprostol 400 µg or less (12 studies; 0/3483 versus 0/3820). This may be because, in general, 400 µg was used in prevention rather than treatment studies, with a lower associated risk of mortality.

 

Secondary outcomes:

 

Maternal death or severe morbidity

'Maternal death or severe morbidity' was significantly higher with misoprostol compared with placebo: 12 studies; 43/5003 (0.86%) versus 24/5082 (0.47%); average RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.81; Tau² = 0, I² = 0%;  Analysis 1.2. One study (SATAEV 2010:600SL vs P), contributed most of the morbidity events (41/67 events). When we excluded this study in a sensitivity analysis, there was no longer a statistically significant difference between the misoprostol and placebo groups (11 studies; average RR 1.15, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.57; I² = 0%;  Analysis 1.3).

There was no statistically significant difference between misoprostol and other uterotonics: 17 studies; average RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.50, 4.52; Tau² = 1.81, I² = 69%,  Analysis 1.2; however, there was significant heterogeneity in this subgroup. This was due to the very large effect in one study (EEV 2010:800SL vs U), contributed to by an unusually high rate of hyperpyrexia in one site (58/66 cases occurred in Ecuador). We performed sensitivity analysis by excluding this study. Following this exclusion, the point estimate of the average RR reduced to 1.16, results remained not statistically significantly different, and the heterogeneity disappeared (16 studies; RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.76; I² = 0%;  Analysis 1.3).

When we excluded both (EEV 2010:800SL vs U and SATAEV 2010:600SL vs P), the overall relative effect of misoprostol versus control was not significantly different between the groups (27 studies; average RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.72; I² = 0%,  Analysis 1.3).

Considering all the studies of misoprostol versus placebo or other uterotonics, most cases of 'maternal death or severe morbidity' occurred in studies using 600 µg misoprostol or more (19 trials; average RR 1.67; 95% CI 0.80 to 3.45;  Analysis 3.2). When we excluded the two outlier studies as above in a sensitivity analysis (EEV 2010:800SL vs U and SATAEV 2010:600SL vs P), the results for 'maternal death or severe morbidity' remained statistically non-significant,  Analysis 3.3).

 

Maternal death or severe morbidity, excluding hyperpyrexia

To determine whether differences in the outcome 'maternal death or severe morbidity' were mainly due to cases of hyperpyrexia, we conducted a non-prespecified analysis of the outcome excluding hyperpyrexia. There was no difference between misoprostol and the comparison groups overall (29 studies; RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.67 to 1.41; I² = 0%,  Analysis 1.4), or when subgrouped by misoprostol dosage ( Analysis 3.4). This suggests that the increased morbidity with misoprostol was mainly due to hyperpyrexia, with most events occurring in two large multicentre studies of misoprostol for the treatment of PPH (EEV 2010:800SL vs U; SATAEV 2010:600SL vs P). In these latter studies, hyperpyrexia occurred mainly in Ecuador.

 

Pyrexia ≥ 38°C

There was considerable heterogeneity in the effect on pyrexia, which was increased with misoprostol (56 studies, 2776/25,647 (10.8%) versus 614/26,800 (2.3%); average RR 3.97, 95% CI 3.13 to 5.04, Tau² = 0.47, I² = 80% random-effects model;  Analysis 1.5). This increase occurred both in trials of misoprostol versus placebo (20 studies; 1059/6212 (17%) versus 265/6228 (4.3%); average RR 3.25; 95% CI 2.30 to 4.59; Tau² = 0.40, I² = 79%) and versus other uterotonics (39 studies; 1717/19,435 (8.8%) versus 349/20,572 (1.7%); average RR 4.70; 95% CI 3.36 to 6.57; Tau² = 0.59, I² = 81%;  Analysis 1.5). The effect was greater for trials using misoprostol 600 µg or more (27 studies; 2197/17,864 (12.3%) versus 422/18,161 (2.3%); average RR 4.64; 95% CI 3.33 to 6.46; Tau² = 0.51, I² = 86%;  Analysis 3.5) than for those using misoprostol 400 µg or less (31 studies; 525/6751 (7.8%) versus 185/7668 (2.4%); average RR 3.07; 95% CI 2.25 to 4.18; Tau² = 0.29, I² = 58%;  Analysis 3.5).

 

Discussion

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms
 

Summary of main results

The number of maternal deaths is too small for meaningful statistical analysis. The range of plausible effects lies between a small (18%) reduction and a large (5.28 times) increase with misoprostol. The outcome 'death or severe morbidity' was increased with misoprostol, due to a large increase in hyperpyrexia in dosages of 600 µg or more. When hyperpyrexia was excluded from the definition, there was no difference between groups. As most of these hyperpyrexia events occurred in Ecuador, this may indicate a genetic predisposition. Pyrexia was, as expected, increased with misoprostol and this effect was dose-related.

 

Overall completeness and applicability of evidence

This review only includes studies of women who received misoprostol after giving birth for prevention or treatment of PPH. It does not include studies of women receiving misoprostol for abortion or induction of labour, for which different dosages of misoprostol are used. Therefore, these results are not applicable to these other uses of misoprostol, which require a separate review.

Although not statistically significantly different to the control group data, all maternal deaths and most maternal morbidity with misoprostol occurred with dosages of ≥ 600 µg. We consider the current evidence to be incomplete, particularly with regard to the optimal dosage of misoprostol in relation to maternal mortality and morbidity, which requires further investigation in large randomised trials.

 

Quality of the evidence

The methodological quality of studies was variable, but most of the studies that contributed data on maternal death were at a low risk of bias. We consider the quality of evidence with regard to maternal mortality or morbidity to be moderate due to the small numbers of events and further evidence is likely to change our confidence in the estimates of effect.

A feature of the review is the considerable heterogeneity of results which may be related to the variety of study designs, populations studied and co-interventions. Sensitivity analysis performed by removing studies at higher risk of bias did not remove the heterogeneity. However, two studies were responsible for much of the heterogeneity related to maternal morbidity, especially the exceptionally high incidence of hyperpyrexia in Ecuador. When we excluded these studies in sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity related to the composite outcome 'death or severe morbidity' was eliminated. Hyperpyrexia data from these studies seem incompatible with those of other studies, however, they may indicate that genetic differences contribute to the pyrexial events with misoprostol use. Therefore, for the composite outcome, we consider the results of the non-prespecified analysis (that excludes hyperpyrexia per se, and not the two trials) to be of a better quality and more widely applicable.

 

Potential biases in the review process

We pooled the relative effects of comparator groups (placebo and uterotonics) in our meta-analyses in order to improve the power of our meta-analyses, and on the basis that severe adverse effects of misoprostol, if existent, would be expected to occur in the misoprostol groups irrespective of the comparator. We have also presented the results for all outcomes by individual comparator groups, as well as the pooled results, and therefore do not consider this to be a substantial source of bias in the review. In addition, we have used random-effects methods for most meta-analyses, except for maternal mortality which is a relatively rare outcome, or where there was no evidence of heterogeneity in the data.

It is possible that our composite outcome may be improved by including other outcomes, e,g, blood transfusions, which may be better indicators of severe morbidity. We plan to reconsider this composite outcome in future versions of this review. However, severe morbidity including hyperpyrexia may have been underestimated as some studies did not perform a quantitative assessment of pyrexia but included other severe morbidity, and so we included these in this meta-analysis (e.g. Nigeria 2011:600PO vs U). On the other hand, hyperpyrexia may be less important as an indicator of severe morbidity as it does not appear to have long-term effects on the woman or lead to near-misses or prolonged hospitalisation.

Many authors find it redundant to report that there were no maternal deaths in their studies, especially those small studies conducted in low-risk women. If no maternal death was mentioned in the paper, we asked the authors to confirm that no death had occurred. If we were unable to contact them, we excluded the study from the outcome analysis. By excluding studies where the reporting of maternal deaths was omitted, we may have over-estimated the risk of maternal death slightly; however, the studies excluded on this basis were numerically small and unlikely to have had a large effect.

 

Agreements and disagreements with other studies or reviews

The findings are consistent with our previous review (Hofmeyr 2009). We are not aware of other reviews that have focused on maternal deaths in randomised postpartum misoprostol trials.

 

Authors' conclusions

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms

 

Implications for practice

We have not found evidence that misoprostol significantly increases or decreases the risk of maternal death or serious morbidity (excluding hyperpyrexia) when used in the prevention and treatment of PPH. This review focusses on safety and has not addressed the effectiveness of misoprostol in terms of blood loss, which is covered in separate Cochrane reviews (Mousa 2007; Tuncalp 2012). Tuncalp 2012 found that misoprostol was less effective than injectable uterotonics with respect to blood loss, and more effective than placebo in settings in which injectable uterotonics were not used.

The increased risk of hyperpyrexia with doses of 600 µg or above is reason for concern. Hyperpyrexia is occasionally life-threatening, and at least (as is shivering and pyrexia) an unpleasant experience for women at a time that interactions with her newborn baby are of great importance. In one study of misoprostol 800 µg sublingually for the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage included in this review (EEV 2010:800SL vs U), 229 (47%) of women experienced shivering and 55 found it intolerable, while 66 women (14%) experienced hyperpyrexia > 40°C, of whom 22 found the pyrexia intolerable. These hyperpyrexia results are incompatible with the other included studies and are unlikely to be representative of most women using misoprostol. However, they do indicate that certain women may have a genetic predisposition to a hyperpyrexia response. Pyrexia > 38°C, however, was reported across all trials using misoprostol 600 µg or more.

Our previous review found no difference in effectiveness in terms of blood loss between misoprostol 600 µg or more and 400 µg, using both direct and adjusted indirect comparisons (Hofmeyr 2009). The current review has found no evidence of benefit in terms of 'maternal mortality or severe morbidity' with misoprostol in any dosage versus placebo, and increased adverse effects (pyrexia) in dosages of 600 µg or more. Given the fact that misoprostol is used prophylactically in very large numbers of healthy women, in settings without access to more effective uterotonics, the greatest emphasis should be placed on limiting adverse effects. In this context, the findings of this review support use of the lowest effective dose.

 
Implications for research

As for any new medication being used on a very large scale, continued vigilance for adverse effects is essential. In the context of ongoing programs to introduce misoprostol for routine management of the third stage of labour, there is a need for very large (cluster) randomised trials to further elucidate both the relative effectiveness and the risks of adverse effects of various dosages of misoprostol. There is also a need for more studies of the effects of various dosages of postpartum misoprostol on physiologic parameters such as pulmonary artery vasoconstriction (Qian 1994) and heart rate (Brecht 1987).

 

Acknowledgements

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms

Pregnancy and Childbirth Group editorial base for technical support; Verena Linder, Sandra Ferreira and Gilda Piaggio for contributions to previous, non-Cochrane versions of this review.

As part of the pre-publication editorial process, this review has been commented on by four peers (an editor and three referees who are external to the editorial team), a member of the Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's international panel of consumers and the Group's Statistical Adviser.

The World Health Organization (and G Justus Hofmeyr, Natalia Novikova and Theresa A Lawrie) retain copyright and all other rights in their respective contributions to the manuscript of this Review as submitted for publication.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is the largest single funder of the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group. The views and opinions expressed therein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NIHR, NHS or the Department of Health.

 

Data and analyses

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms
Download statistical data

 
Comparison 1. Misoprostol versus control (placebo or uterotonic) subgrouped by comparator

Outcome or subgroup titleNo. of studiesNo. of participantsStatistical methodEffect size

 1 Maternal deaths3139791Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.08 [0.82, 5.28]

    1.1 Misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
109333Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.70 [0.72, 10.11]

    1.2 Misoprostol vs other uterotonics
2130458Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.54 [0.40, 5.92]

 2 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity2939127Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)1.46 [0.81, 2.64]

    2.1 Misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
1210085Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)1.70 [1.02, 2.81]

    2.2 Misoprostol vs other uterotonics
1729042Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)1.50 [0.50, 4.52]

 3 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity (sensitivity analysis)2939127Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.51 [1.86, 3.39]

    3.1 Misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
1210085Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.75 [1.09, 2.81]

    3.2 Misoprostol vs other uterotonics
1729042Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)3.12 [2.10, 4.63]

 4 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity excluding hyperpyrexia2939127Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.97 [0.67, 1.41]

    4.1 Misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
1210085Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.15 [0.66, 2.01]

    4.2 Misoprostol vs other uterotonics
1729042Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.84 [0.50, 1.40]

 5 Pyrexia ≥ 38°C5652447Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)3.97 [3.13, 5.04]

    5.1 Misoprostol vs other uterotonics
3940007Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)4.70 [3.36, 6.57]

    5.2 Misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
2012440Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)3.25 [2.30, 4.59]

 
Comparison 2. Misoprostol versus control (placebo or uterotonic) subgrouped by comparator and indication

Outcome or subgroup titleNo. of studiesNo. of participantsStatistical methodEffect size

 1 Maternal deaths3139791Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.08 [0.82, 5.28]

    1.1 Prevention: misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
77612Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.00 [0.14, 7.07]

    1.2 Prevention: misoprostol vs other uterotonics
1928671Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.77 [0.37, 8.34]

    1.3 Treatment: misoprostol vs placebo
31721Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)6.16 [0.75, 50.85]

    1.4 Treatment: misoprostol vs other uterotonics
21787Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.99 [0.06, 15.74]

 2 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity29Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)Subtotals only

    2.1 Prevention: misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
88204Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)0.98 [0.39, 2.43]

    2.2 Prevention: misoprostol vs other uterotonics
1427191Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)0.92 [0.52, 1.64]

    2.3 Treatment: misoprostol vs placebo
41881Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)2.14 [0.76, 6.01]

    2.4 Treatment: misoprostol vs other uterotonics
31851Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)6.45 [0.21, 201.46]

 3 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity excluding hyperpyrexia2939127Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.97 [0.67, 1.41]

    3.1 Prevention: misoprostol vs placebo or nothing
88204Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.90 [0.36, 2.27]

    3.2 Prevention: misoprostol vs other uterotonics
1427191Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.70 [0.39, 1.26]

    3.3 Treatment: misoprostol vs placebo
41881Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.33 [0.66, 2.69]

    3.4 Treatment: misoprostol vs other uterotonics
31851Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.65 [0.52, 5.29]

 4 Pyrexia ≥ 38°C5552921Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)3.99 [3.16, 5.04]

    4.1 Prevention: misoprostol ≥ 600 µg vs placebo or nothing
86308Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)5.15 [2.89, 9.19]

    4.2 Prevention: misoprostol 400 µg vs placebo
84208Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)2.24 [1.55, 3.23]

    4.3 Prevention: misoprostol < 400 µg vs placebo
1250Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)4.5 [0.99, 20.41]

    4.4 Prevention: misoprostol ≥ 600 µg vs other uterotonics
1426056Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)5.45 [3.64, 8.15]

    4.5 Prevention: misoprostol 400 µg vs other uterotonics
2412138Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)3.98 [2.62, 6.04]

    4.6 Prevention: misoprostol < 400 vs other uterotonics
1300Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)10.55 [0.62, 178.27]

    4.7 Treatment: misoprostol vs placebo
41874Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)2.88 [2.40, 3.47]

    4.8 Treatment: misoprostol ≥ 600 µg vs other uterotonics
21787Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)3.43 [0.61, 19.29]

 
Comparison 3. Misoprostol vs control subgrouped by misoprostol dose

Outcome or subgroup titleNo. of studiesNo. of participantsStatistical methodEffect size

 1 Maternal deaths3039731Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.08 [0.82, 5.28]

    1.1 Misoprostol = or > 600 µg dose
1832428Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.08 [0.82, 5.28]

    1.2 Misoprostol = or < 400 µg dose
127303Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.0 [0.0, 0.0]

 2 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity2838534Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)1.43 [0.78, 2.64]

    2.1 Misoprostol = or > 600 µg dose
1933041Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)1.67 [0.80, 3.45]

    2.2 Misoprostol = or < 400 µg dose
95493Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)0.78 [0.28, 2.17]

 3 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity (sensitivity analysis)2838534Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.45 [1.81, 3.32]

    3.1 Misoprostol = or > 600 µg dose
1933041Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.81 [2.04, 3.89]

    3.2 Misoprostol = or < 400 µg dose
95493Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.45 [0.14, 1.46]

 4 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity excluding hyperpyrexia2939127Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.97 [0.67, 1.41]

    4.1 Misoprostol = or > 600 µg dose
2033634Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.01 [0.67, 1.51]

    4.2 Misoprostol = or < 400 µg dose
95493Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.79 [0.29, 2.12]

 5 Pyrexia ≥ 38°C5550444Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)3.96 [3.11, 5.05]

    5.1 Misoprostol = or > 600 µg dose
2736025Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)4.64 [3.33, 6.46]

    5.2 Misoprostol = or < 400 µg dose
3114419Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)3.07 [2.25, 4.18]

 
Comparison 4. Misoprostol vs control subgrouped by route of administration

Outcome or subgroup titleNo. of studiesNo. of participantsStatistical methodEffect size

 1 Maternal deaths3038391Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.08 [0.82, 5.28]

    1.1 Oral
1227572Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.23 [0.33, 4.60]

    1.2 Sublingual
128361Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)2.51 [0.49, 12.86]

    1.3 Rectal
52220Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.0 [0.0, 0.0]

    1.4 mixed route
1238Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)7.24 [0.38, 138.60]

 2 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity2737567Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)1.55 [0.85, 2.83]

    2.1 Oral
927935Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)1.07 [0.60, 1.92]

    2.2 Sublingual
138420Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)2.20 [0.79, 6.16]

    2.3 Rectal
4974Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)0.37 [0.07, 1.99]

    2.4 Mixed route
1238Risk Ratio (M-H, Random, 95% CI)11.37 [0.64, 203.41]

 3 Maternal deaths or severe morbidity excluding hyperpyrexia2737567Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.01 [0.69, 1.48]

    3.1 Oral
927935Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.81 [0.43, 1.51]

    3.2 Sublingual
138420Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)1.14 [0.66, 1.99]

    3.3 Rectal
4974Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)0.34 [0.07, 1.65]

    3.4 Mixed route
1238Risk Ratio (M-H, Fixed, 95% CI)11.37 [0.64, 203.41]

 

Appendices

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms
 

Appendix 1. Risk of bias tool

 
(1) Random sequence generation (checking for possible selection bias)

We described for each included study the method used to generate the allocation sequence in sufficient detail to allow an assessment of whether it should produce comparable groups.

We will assess the method as:

  • low risk of bias (any truly random process, e.g. random number table; computer random number generator);
  • high risk of bias (any non-random process, e.g. odd or even date of birth; hospital or clinic record number); or
  • unclear risk of bias.   

 
(2) Allocation concealment (checking for possible selection bias)

We described for each included study the method used to conceal allocation to interventions prior to assignment and assessed whether intervention allocation could have been foreseen in advance of, or during recruitment, or changed after assignment.

We assessed the methods as:

  • low risk of bias (e.g. telephone or central randomisation; consecutively numbered sealed opaque envelopes);
  • high risk of bias (open random allocation; unsealed or non-opaque envelopes, alternation; date of birth);
  • unclear risk of bias.   

 
(3.1) Blinding of participants and personnel (checking for possible performance bias)

We described for each included study the methods used, if any, to blind study participants and personnel from knowledge of which intervention a participant received. We considered that studies were at low risk of bias if they were blinded, or if we judge that the lack of blinding would be unlikely to affect results. We assessed blinding separately for different outcomes or classes of outcomes.

We assessed the methods as:

  • low, high or unclear risk of bias for participants;
  • low, high or unclear risk of bias for personnel.

 
(3.2) Blinding of outcome assessment (checking for possible detection bias)

We described for each included study the methods used, if any, to blind outcome assessors from knowledge of which intervention a participant received. We assessed methods used to blind outcome assessment as:

  • low, high or unclear risk of bias.

 
(4) Incomplete outcome data (checking for possible attrition bias due to the amount, nature and handling of incomplete outcome data)

We described for each included study, and for each outcome or class of outcomes, the completeness of data including attrition and exclusions from the analysis. We stated whether attrition and exclusions were reported and the numbers included in the analysis at each stage (compared with the total randomised participants), reasons for attrition or exclusion where reported, and whether missing data were balanced across groups or were related to outcomes. Where sufficient information was reported, or could be supplied by the trial authors, we re-included missing data in the analyses which we undertook.

We assessed methods as:

  • low risk of bias (e.g. no missing outcome data; missing outcome data balanced across groups);
  • high risk of bias (e.g. numbers or reasons for missing data imbalanced across groups; ‘as treated’ analysis done with substantial departure of intervention received from that assigned at randomisation);
  • unclear risk of bias.

 
(5) Selective reporting (checking for reporting bias)

We assessed the methods as:

  • low risk of bias (where it is clear that all of the study’s pre-specified outcomes and all expected outcomes of interest to the review have been reported);
  • high risk of bias (where not all the study’s pre-specified outcomes have been reported; one or more reported primary outcomes were not pre-specified; outcomes of interest are reported incompletely and so cannot be used; study fails to include results of a key outcome that would have been expected to have been reported);
  • unclear risk of bias.

 
(6) Other bias (checking for bias due to problems not covered by (1) to (5) above)

We assessed whether each study was free of other problems that could have put it at risk of bias:

  • low risk of other bias;
  • high risk of other bias;
  • unclear whether there is risk of other bias.

 
(7) Overall risk of bias

We made explicit judgements about whether studies were at high risk of bias, according to the criteria given in the Handbook (Higgins 2011). With reference to (1) to (6) above, we assessed the likely magnitude and direction of the bias and whether we consider it likely to impact on the findings.  We explored the impact of the level of bias through undertaking sensitivity analyses - see 'Sensitivity analysis'. 

 

Contributions of authors

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms

GJH conceived the review and developed the fist draft of the protocol. NN, AMG and GJH contributed to the development of the protocol. TL and GJH contributed to selection of studies and data extraction. GJH prepared the first draft of the review. All authors contributed to the final version of the review.

 

Declarations of interest

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms

GJH and AMG have participated in trials eligible for consideration of inclusion in the review. They did not participate in decisions regarding such trials. GJH has received research funding from Gynuity, a non-profit organisation, for conducting a trial of misoprostol for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.

 

Sources of support

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms
 

Internal sources

  • No sources of support supplied

 

External sources

  • National Institute for Health Research, UK.
    Cochrane Review Incentive Scheme Award 12/183/03

 

Differences between protocol and review

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. Contributions of authors
  12. Declarations of interest
  13. Sources of support
  14. Differences between protocol and review
  15. Index terms

An exploratory, non-prespecified, analysis of maternal death or severe morbidity excluding hyperpyrexia was conducted to determine whether the increase in maternal death nor severe morbidity with misoprostol was due entirely to increased hyperpyrexia.

For future versions of this review, we may reformulate the composite outcome 'maternal death or severe morbidity', possibly to include 'blood transfusions'. Furthermore, it may be of value to adapt the protocol to include studies of misoprostol use for retained placenta.

* Indicates the major publication for the study

References

References to studies included in this review

  1. Top of page
  2. AbstractRésumé
  3. Background
  4. Objectives
  5. Methods
  6. Results
  7. Discussion
  8. Authors' conclusions
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. Data and analyses
  11. Appendices
  12. Contributions of authors
  13. Declarations of interest
  14. Sources of support
  15. Differences between protocol and review
  16. Characteristics of studies
  17. References to studies included in this review
  18. References to studies excluded from this review
  19. References to studies awaiting assessment
  20. References to ongoing studies
  21. Additional references
  22. References to other published versions of this review
Australia 1999:400PO vs U {published data only}
  • Cook CM, Spurrett B, Murray H. A randomized clinical trial comparing oral misoprostol with synthetic oxytocin or syntometrine in the third stage of labour. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1999;39(4):414-9.
Bangla 2007:400PO vs U {published data only}
  • Sultana N, Khatun M. Misoprostol versus oxytocin in the active management of the third stage of labour. Journal of Bangladesh College of Physicians and Surgeons 2007;25(2):73-6.
Belgium 1999:600PO vs U {published data only}
BETV 2010:800SL vs U {published data only}
  • Blum J, Winikoff B, Raghavan S, Dabash R, Ramadan MC, Dilbaz B, et al. Treatment of post-partum haemorrhage with sublingual misoprostol versus oxytocin in women receiving prophylactic oxytocin: a double-blind, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Lancet 2010;375(9710):217-23.
  • Blum J, Winikoff B, Raghavan S, Dabash R, Ramadan MC, Dilbaz B, et al. Treatment of postpartum hemorrhage with sublingual misoprostol versus oxytocin: results from a randomized non-inferiority trial among women receiving prophylactic oxytocin. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2009;107(Suppl 2):S22-3.
  • Dao B, Blum J, Barrera G, Cherine Ramadan M, Dabash R, Darwish E, et al. Side effect profiles for misoprostol and oxytocin in the treatment of postpartum hemorrhage. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2009;107(Suppl 2):S150.
Canada 2002:400PR vs U {published data only}
  • Karkanis SG, Caloia D, Salenieks ME, Kingdom J, Walker M, Meffe F, et al. Randomized controlled trial of rectal misoprostol versus oxytocin in third stage management. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada: JOGC 2002;24(2):149-54.
Canada 2007:400PO vs U {published data only}
  • Baskett TF, Persad V, Clough H, Young D. Prophylactic use of misoprostol in the third stage of labor [abstract]. Obstetrics & Gynecology 2005;105(4 Suppl):39S.
  • Baskett TF, Persad VL, Clough HJ, Young DC. Misoprostol versus oxytocin for the reduction of postpartum blood loss. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2007;97(1):2-5.
China 2001:600PO vs U {published data only}
  • Ng PS, Chan ASM, Sin WK, Tang LCH, Cheung KB, Yuen PM. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of oral misoprostol and im syntometrine in the management of the third stage of labour. Human Reproduction 2001;16(1):31-5.
  • Ng PS, Chan ASM, Sin WK, Tang LCH, Cheung KB, Yuen PM. Comparison of oral misoprostol and intramuscular syntometrine in the management of the third stage of labor - a multicenter randomised controlled trial. XVI FIGO World Congress of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Book 4; 2000 Sept 3-8; Washington DC, USA. 2000:29.
China 2003:400PO vs N {published data only}
  • Fu YX, Ran KQ, Wang M. Prevention of early postpartum hemorrhage by way of oral misoprostol. Journal of Nursing Science 2003;18(12):910-1.
China 2004a:600SL vs U {published data only}
  • Lam H, Tang OS, Lee CP, Ho PC. A pilot-randomized comparison of sublingual misoprostol with syntometrine on the blood loss in third stage of labor. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 2004;83:647-50.
China 2004b:400PO vs P {published data only}
  • Yuen PM, Ng PS, Sahota DS. A double-blind randomised controlled trial of oral misoprostol in addition to intra-muscular syntometrine in the management of the third stage of labour. 30th British Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; 2004 July 7-9; Glasgow, UK. 2004:62.
China 2007:400PO vs U {published data only}
  • Ng PS, Lai CY, Sahota DS, Yuen PM. A double-blind randomized controlled trial of oral misoprostol and intramuscular syntometrine in the management of the third stage of labor. Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation 2007;63(1):55-60.
  • Ng PS, Yuen PM, Sahota DS. Comparison of oral misoprostol and intravascular syntocinon in the management of the third stage of labour - a double-blind randomised controlled trial. 30th British Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; 2004 July 7-9; Glasgow, UK. 2004:69.
Colombia 2002:50SL vs U {published data only}
  • Penaranda WA, Arrieta OB, Yances BR. Active management of childbirth with sublingual misoprostol: a controlled clinical trial in the Hospital de Maternidad Rafael Calvo [Manejo activo del alumbramiento con misoprostol sublingual: un estudio clinico controlado en al hospital de maternidad rafael calvo de cartagena]. Revista Colombiana de Obstetricia y Ginecologia 2002;53(1):87-92.
EEV 2010:800SL vs U {published and unpublished data}
  • Winikoff B. Misoprostol for the treatment of postpartum hemorrhage. ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/) (accessed 20 February 2008) 2008.
  • Winikoff B, Dabash R, Durocher J, Darwish E, Ngoc NTN, Leon W, et al. Treatment of postpartum hemorrhage with sublingual misoprostol versus oxytocin: results from a randomized, non-inferiority trial among women not exposed to oxytocin during labor. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2009;107(Suppl 2):S59.
  • Winikoff B, Dabash R, Durocher J, Darwish E, Nguyen TN, Leon W, et al. Treatment of post-partum haemorrhage with sublingual misoprostol versus oxytocin in women not exposed to oxytocin during labour: a double-blind, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Lancet 2010;375(9710):210-6.
Egypt 2009:800PR vs U {published and unpublished data}
  • Nasr A, Shahin AY, Elsamman AM, Zakherah MS, Shaaban OM. Rectal misoprostol versus intravenous oxytocin for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2009;105(3):244-7.
Egypt 2012a:CS400PR vs P {published data only}
  • Elsedeek MS. Impact of preoperative rectal misoprostol on blood loss during and after elective cesarean delivery. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;118(2):149-52.
Egypt 2012b:CS400SL vs P {published and unpublished data}
  • El Tahan MR, Warda OM, Rashad A, Yasseen AM, Ramzy EA, Ahmady MS, et al. Effects of preoperative sublingual misoprostol on uterine tone during isoflurane anesthesia for cesarean section. Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia 2012;62(5):625-35.
France 2001:600PO vsP vsU {published data only}
  • Benchimol M, Gondry J, Mention JE, Gagneur O, Boulanger JC. Role of misoprostol in the delivery outcome. [French] [Place du misoprostol dans la direction de la delivrance.]. Journal de Gynecologie, Obstetrique et Biologie de la Reproduction 2001;30(6):576-83.
Gambia 2004:600PO/SL vs P {published data only}
Gambia 2005:600PO vs U {published data only}
Ghana 2000:400PO vs U {published data only}
Ghana 2006: 800PR vs U {published data only}
  • Parsons S, Ntumy YM, Walley RL, Wilson JB, Crane JMG, Matthews K, et al. Rectal misoprostol vs intramuscular oxytocin in the routine management of the third stage of labour. 30th British Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; 2004 July 7-9; Glasgow, UK. 2004:18.
  • Parsons SM, Walley RL, Crane JM, Matthews K, Hutchens D. Rectal misoprostol versus oxytocin in the management of the third stage of labour. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada 2007;29(9):711-8.
Guinea-B 2005:600SL vs P {published data only}
  • Hoj L, Cardoso P, Nielsen BB, Hvidman L, Nielsen J, Aaby P. Effect of sublingual misoprostol on severe postpartum haemorrhage in a primary health centre in Guinea-Bissau: randomised double blind clinical trial. BMJ 2005;331:723-7.
  • Nielsen BB, Hoj L, Hvidman LE, Nielsen J, Cardoso P, Aaby P. Reduced post-partum bleeding after treatment with sublingual misoprostol: a randomized double-blind clinical study in a developing country - secondary publication [Reduceret post partum-blodning efter sublingval misoprostol: et randomiseret dobbeltblindt klinisk studie i et udviklingsland - sekundaerpublikation.]. Ugeskrift for Laeger 2006;168(13):1341-3.
India 2004a:400SL vs U {published data only}
  • Vimala N, Mittal S, Kumar S, Dadhwal V, Mehta S. Sublingual misoprostol versus methylergometrine for active management of third stage of labor. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2004;87:1-5.
India 2005:600PO vs U {published data only}
  • Garg P, Batra S, Gandhi G. Oral misoprostol versus injectable methylergometrine in management of the third stage of labor. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2005;91(2):160-1.
India 2006a:CS400SL vs U {published data only}
  • Vimala N, Mittal S, Kumar S. Sublingual misoprostol versus oxytocin infusion to reduce blood loss at cesarean section. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;92(2):106-10.
India 2006b:400PO vs U {published data only}
India 2006c:600PO vs P {published data only}
  • Derman RJ, Kodkany BS, Goudar SS, Geller SE, Naik VA, Bellad MB, et al. Oral misoprostol in preventing postpartum haemorrhage in resource-poor communities: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2006;368(9543):1248-53.
  • Geller SE, Goudar SS, Adams MG, Naik VA, Patel A, Bellad MB, et al. Factors associated with acute postpartum hemorrhage in low-risk women delivering in rural India. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2008;101(1):94-9.
  • Geller SE, Patel A, Niak VA, Goudar SS, Edlavitch SA, Kodkany BS, et al. Conducting international collaborative research in developing nations. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2004;87(3):267-71.
  • Goudar SS, Chakraborty H, Edlavitch SA, Naik VA, Bellad MB, Patted SS, et al. Variation in the postpartum hemorrhage rate in a clinical trial of oral misoprostol. Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine 2008;21(8):559-64.
  • Kodkany BS, Derman RJ, Goudar SS, Geller SE, Edlavitch SA, Naik VA, et al. Initiating a novel therapy in preventing postpartum hemorrhage in rural India: a joint collaboration between the United States and India. International Journal of Fertility & Womens Medicine 2004;49(2):91-6.
  • Kodkany BS, Goudar SS, Derman RJ. The efficacy of oral misoprostol in preventing postpartum hemorrhage in a community setting: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;94(Suppl 2):S141-2.
  • Moss NM. Oral misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (ongoing trial). ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/) (accessed 21 March 2006).
  • Patted SS, Goudar SS, Naik VA, Bellad MB, Edlavitch SA, Kodkany BS, et al. Side effects of oral misoprostol for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage: results of a community-based randomised controlled trial in rural India. Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine 2009;22(1):24-8.
India 2006d:400PR vs U {published data only}
  • Nellore V, Mittal S, Dadhwal V. Rectal misoprostol vs. 15-methyl prostaglandin F2alpha for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;94(1):45-6.
India 2006e:400SL vs U {published data only}
  • Verma P, Aggarwal N, Jain V, Suri V. A double-blind randomized controlled trial to compare sublingual misoprostol with methylergometrine for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;94(Suppl 2):S137-8.
India 2006f:600PR vs U {published data only}
  • Gupta B, Jain V, Aggarwal N. Rectal misoprostol versus oxytocin in the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage - a pilot study. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;94(Suppl 2):S139-40.
India 2008:100/200SL vsU {published data only}
India 2009:400/600SL vsU {published data only}
  • Singh G, Radhakrishnan G, Guleria K. Comparison of sublingual misoprostol, intravenous oxytocin, and intravenous methylergometrine in active management of the third stage of labor. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2009;107(2):130-4.
India 2009:400SL vs U {published data only}
  • Vaid A, Dadhwal V, Mittal S, Deka D, Misra R, Sharma JB, et al. A randomized controlled trial of prophylactic sublingual misoprostol versus intramuscular methyl-ergometrine versus intramuscular 15-methyl PGF2alpha in active management of third stage of labor. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2009;280(6):893-7.
India 2010:CS800PR vs U {published data only}
  • Chaudhuri P, Banerjee GB, Mandal A. Rectally administered misoprostol versus intravenous oxytocin infusion during cesarean delivery to reduce intraoperative and postoperative blood loss. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2010;109(1):25-9.
India 2012:CS400SL vs P {published data only}
  • Sood AK, Singh S. Sublingual misoprostol to reduce blood loss at cesarean delivery. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of India 2012;62(2):162-7.
India 2012a:400SL vs U {published and unpublished data}
  • Chaudhuri P, Biswas J, Mandal A. Sublingual misoprostol versus intramuscular oxytocin for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage in low-risk women. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;116(2):138-42.
India 2012b:400SL vs U {published data only}
  • Bellad M, Ganachari TDM, Mallapur M. Sublingual (SL) powdered misoprostol (400 mcg) vs IM oxytocin (10 IU) for prevention of postpartum blood loss - a randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2009;107(Suppl 2):S124-5.
  • Bellad MB, Tara D, Ganachari MS, Mallapur MD, Goudar SS, Kodkany BS, et al. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage with sublingual misoprostol or oxytocin: a double-blind randomised controlled trial. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2012;119(8):975-86.
Indonesia 2002:600PO vs U {published data only}
  • Dasuki D, Emilia O, Harini S. Randomized clinical trial: the effectiveness of oral misoprostol versus oxytocin in prevention of postpartum hemorrhage [abstract]. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research 2002;28(1):46.
Iran 2009:CS400SL vs U {published data only}
  • Eftekhari N, Doroodian M, Lashkarizadeh R. The effect of sublingual misoprostol versus intravenous oxytocin in reducing bleeding after caesarean section. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2009;29(7):633-6.
Jamaica 2009:400PR vs U {published data only}
  • Harriott J, Christie L, Wynter S, DaCosta V, Fletcher H, Reid M. A randomized comparison of rectal misoprostol with syntometrine on blood loss in the third stage of labour. West Indian Medical Journal 2009;58(3):201-6.
Korea 2007:CS400PR vs P {published data only}
  • Hong SC, Kim JW, Park HT, Seol HJ, Kim HJ, Kim SH, et al. Additional rectal misoprostol plus intravenous oxytocin versus intravenous oxytocin for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage after cesarean section. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2007;197(6 Suppl 1):S99, Abstract no: 321.
Mexico 2009:CS800IU vs P {published data only}
  • Quiroga Diaz R, Cantu Mata R, Tello Gutierrez HE, Puente Villalobos M, Montemayor Garza R, Martinez Mendoza A. Intrauterine misoprostol for the prevention of bleeding cesarean. Ginecologia y Obstetricia de Mexico 2009;77(10):469-74.
Mozam 2001:400PR vs U {published data only}
Nepal 2011:1000PR vs U {published data only}
  • Shrestha A, Dongol A, Chawla CD, Adhikari RK. Rectal misoprostol versus intramuscular oxytocin for prevention of post partum hemorrhage. Kathmandu University Medical Journal 2011;33(1):8-12.
Nigeria 2003:600PO vs U {published data only}
  • Oboro VO, Tabowei TO. A randomised controlled trial of misoprostol versus oxytocin in the active management of the third stage of labour. Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 2003;23(1):13-6.
Nigeria 2007:400PO vs U {published and unpublished data}
Nigeria 2010:400PO vs U {published data only}
  • Afolabi EO, Kuti O, Orji EO, Ogunniyi SO. Oral misoprostol versus intramuscular oxytocin in the active management of the third stage of labour. Singapore Medical Journal 2010;51(3):207-11.
Nigeria 2011:400SL vs P {published and unpublished data}
  • Fawole AO, Sotiloye OS, Hunyinbo KI, Umezulike AC, Okunlola MA, Adekanle DA, et al. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of misoprostol and routine uterotonics for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2011;112(2):107-11.
Nigeria 2011:600PO vs U {published and unpublished data}
  • Sadiq UG, Kwanashie O, Mairiga G, Gamaniel S, Isa H, Abdu A, et al. A randomised clinical trial comparing the efficacy of oxytocin injection and oral misoprostol tablet in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in Maiduguri Nigeria. International Research Journal of Pharmacy 2011;2(8):76-81.
Nigeria 2011:CS400SL vs U {published data only}
Pakistan 2008:600SL vs P {published data only}
  • Zuberi NF, Durocher J, Sikander R, Baber N, Blum J, Walraven G. Misoprostol in addition to routine treatment of postpartum hemorrhage: a hospital-based randomized-controlled trial in Karachi, Pakistan. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2008;8:40.
Pakistan 2011:600PO vs P {published data only}
  • Mobeen N, Durocher J, Zuberi NF, Jahan N, Blum J, Wasim S, et al. Administration of misoprostol by trained traditional birth attendants to prevent postpartum haemorrhage in homebirths in Pakistan: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. BJOG: an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology 2011;118:353-61.
  • Mobeen N, Durocher J, Zuberi NF, Jahan N, Blum J, Wasim S, et al. Use of misoprostol by trained traditional birth attendants to prevent postpartum haemorrhage during home deliveries in Pakistan: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2009;107(Suppl 2):S92.
  • Mobeen N, Walraven G. Misoprostol for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage in rural Pakistan (ongoing trial). ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/) (accessed 21 March 2006).
SA 1998a:400PR vs U {published data only}
  • Bamigboye AA, Merrell DA, Hofmeyr GJ, Mitchell R. Randomized comparison of rectal misoprostol with syntometrine for management of third stage of labor. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 1998;77:178-81.
SA 1998b:400PO vs P {published data only}
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Nikodem VC, de Jager M, Gelbart BR. A randomised placebo controlled trial of oral misoprostol in the third stage of labour. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1998;105(9):971-5.
  • Hofmeyr GJ, de Jager M, Rose L, Nikodem VC, Lawrie T. Misoprostol for third stage of labour management: a double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. Proceedings of the 16th Conference on Priorities in Perinatal Care; 1997; South Africa. 1997:29-31.
SA 1998c:400PR vs P {published data only}
  • Bamigboye AA, Hofmeyr GJ, Merrell DA. Rectal misoprostol in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage: a placebo controlled trial. Proceedings of the 17th Conference on Priorities in Perinatal Care; 1998; South Africa. 1998:49-52.
  • Bamigboye AA, Hofmeyr GJ, Merrell DA. Rectal misoprostol in the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage: a placebo-controlled trial. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1998;179(4):1043-6.
SA 1998d:600/400PO vs P {published data only}
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Nikodem C, de Jager M, Drakely A, Gilbart B. Oral misoprostol for labour third stage management: randomised assessment of side effects. Proceedings of the 17th Conference on Priorities in Perinatal Care; 1998; South Africa. 1998:53-4.
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Nikodem VC, De Jager M, Drakely AJ. Side effects of oral misoprostol in the third stage of labour: a random allocation placebo controlled trial. Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 2000;20(Suppl 1):S40-1.
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Nikodem VC, de Jager M, Drakely A. Side-effects of oral misoprostol in the third stage of labour--a randomised placebo-controlled trial. South African Medical Journal 2001;91(5):432-5.
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Nikodem VC, de Jager M, Gelbart BR. A randomised placebo controlled trial of oral misoprostol in the third stage of labour. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1998;105(9):971-5.
SA 2001a:600PO vs P {published data only}
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Nikodem VC, de Jager M, Drakely A. Side-effects of oral misoprostol in the third stage of labour--a randomised placebo-controlled trial. South African Medical Journal 2001;91(5):432-5.
  • Maholwana B, Hofmeyr GJ, Nikodem C, Ferreira S, Singata M, Mangesi L, et al. Misoprostol for treating postpartum haemorrhage. 21st Conference on Priorities in Perinatal Care in South Africa; 2002 March 5-8; Eastern Cape, South Africa. 2002.
SA 2001b:800PR vs U {published data only}
  • Lokugamage AU, Moodley J, Sullivan K, Rodeck CH, Niculescu L, Tigere P. The Durban primary postpartum haemorrhage study. Women's Health - into the new millennium. Proceedings of the 4th International Scientific Meeting of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists; 1999 October 3-6; Cape Town South Africa. RCOG, 1999:77-8.
  • Lokugamage AU, Sullivan KR, Niculescu I, Tigere P, Onyangunga F, El Refaey H, et al. A randomized study comparing rectally administered misoprostol versus Syntometrine combined with an oxytocin infusion for the cessation of primary post partum hemorrhage. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 2001;80:835-9.
SA 2004:1000PO/SL/PR vs P {published data only}
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Ferreirs S, Nikodem VC, Mangesi L, Singata M, Jafta Z, et al. Misoprostol for treating postpartum haemorrhage: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN72263357]. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2004;4:16.
SANU 2011:400SL vs P {published and unpublished data}
  • Hofmeyr GJ. Misoprostol for preventing postpartum hemorrhage. ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/) (accessed 20 February 2008) 2008.
  • Hofmeyr GJ, Fawole B, Mugerwa K, Godi NP, Blignaut Q, Mangesi L, et al. Administration of 400mug of misoprostol to augment routine active management of the third stage of labor. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2011;112(2):98-102.
SATAEV 2010:600SL vs P {published data only}
  • Villar J. Misoprostol to treat postpartum hemorrhage (PPH): a randomized controlled trial (Argentina, Egypt, South Africa, Thailand and Viet Nam). Current Controlled Trials (www.controlled-trials.com/mrct) (accessed 21 March 2006) 2006.
  • Widmer M, Blum J, Hofmeyr GJ, Carroli G, Abdel-Aleem H, Lumbiganon P, et al. Misoprostol as an adjunct to standard uterotonics for treatment of post-partum haemorrhage: a multicentre, double-blind randomised trial. Lancet 2010;375(9728):1808-13.
Spain 2009:400SL200PRvsN {published data only}
  • Carbonell i Esteve JL, Hernandez JMR, Piloto M, Setien SA, Texido CS, Tomasi G, et al. Active management of the third phase of labour plus 400 mug of sublingual misoprostol and 200 mug of rectal misoprostol versus active management only in the prevention of post-partum haemorrhage. A randomised clinical trial [Manejo activo de la tercera fase del parto mas 400 mug de misoprostol sublingual y 200 mug de misoprostol rectal frente a manejo activo solo en la prevencion de la hemorragia posparto. Ensayo clinico aleatorizado]. Progresos de Obstetricia y Ginecologia 2009;52(10):543-51.
Switzer 1999:600PO vs P {published data only}
  • Surbek DV, Fehr PM, Hoesli I, Holzgreve W. Misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage: a randomized controlled trial [abstract]. XVI FIGO World Congress of Obstetrics & Gynecology; 2000 Sept 3-8; Washington DC, USA 2000;Book 1:33.
  • Surbek DV, Fehr PM, Hoesli I, Holzgreve W. Oral misoprostol vs placebo for third stage of labour [Orales misoprostol reduziert den postpartalen blutverlust]. Gynakologisch Geburtshilfliche Rundschau 1999;39:144.
  • Surbek DV, Fehr PM, Hosli I, Holzgreve W. Oral misoprostol for third stage of labor: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Obstetrics & Gynecology 1999;94(2):255-8.
Switzer 2006:CS800PO vsU {published data only}
  • Lapaire O, Schneider MC, Stotz M, Surbek DV, Holzgreve W, Hoesli IM. Oral misoprostol vs. intravenous oxytocin in reducing blood loss after emergency cesarean delivery. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;95(1):2-7.
Tibet 2009:600PO vs U {published data only}
  • Miller S, Tudor C, Thorsten V, Nyima, Kalyang, Sonam, et al. Randomized double masked trial of Zhi Byed 11, a Tibetan traditional medicine, versus misoprostol to prevent postpartum hemorrhage in Lhasa, Tibet. Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health 2009;54(2):133-41.
  • Tudor C, Miller S, Nyima, Sonam, Droyoung, Varner M. Preliminary progress report: randomized double-blind trial of Zhi Byed 11, a Tibetan traditional medicine, versus misoprostol to prevent postpartum hemorrhage in Lhasa, Tibet. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;94(Suppl 2):S145-6.
  • Wright L. Preventing postpartum hemorrhage using a Tibetan traditional medicine (ongoing trial). ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/) (accessed 21 March 2006).
Tunis 2009:CS200SL vs P {published data only}
  • Fekih M, Jnifene A, Fathallah K, Ben Regaya L, Memmi A, Bouguizene S, et al. Benefit of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage in cesarean section: a randomized controlled trial. Journal de Gynecologie, Obstetrique et Biologie de la Reproduction 2009;38(7):588-93.
Turkey 2002:400PR vs P/U {published data only}
  • Caliskan E, Meydanli M, Dilbaz B, Aykan B, Sonmezer M, Haberal A. Is rectal misoprostol really effective in the treatment of third stage of labor? A randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2002;187:1038-45.
Turkey 2003:400PO vs P/U {published data only}
  • Caliskan E, Dilbaz B, Meydanli MM, Ozturk N, Narin MA, Haberal A. Oral misoprostol for the third stage of labor: a randomized controlled trial. Obstetrics & Gynecology 2003;101(5 Pt 1):921-8.
Turkey 2005:400V/R vs P {published data only}
UK 2000:500PO vs U {published data only}
  • El-Refaey H, Nooh R, O'Brien P, Abdalla M, Geary M, Walder J, et al. The misoprostol third stage of labour study: a randomised controlled comparison between orally administered misoprostol and standard management. BJOG: an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology 2000;107(9):1104-10.
UK 2001:CS400PO vs U {published data only}
UK 2001:CS500PO vs U {published data only}
  • Lokugamage AU, Paine M, Bassaw-Balroop K, Sullivan KR, El-Refaey H, Rodeck CH. Active management of the third stage at caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial of misoprostol versus syntocinon. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 2001;41(4):411-4.
USA 2001:400PR vs U {published data only}
  • Gerstenfeld TS, Wing DA. Rectal misoprostol versus intravenous oxytocin for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal delivery. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2001;185:878-82.
USA 2004:200B vs P {published data only}
  • Bhullar A, Carlan SJ, Hamm J, Lamberty N, White L, Richichi K. Buccal misoprostol to decrease blood loss after vaginal delivery: a randomized trial. Obstetrics & Gynecology 2004;104(6):1282-8.
USA 2005:CS200B vs P {published data only}
  • Hamm J, Russell Z, Botha T, Carlan SJ, Richichi K. Buccal misoprostol to prevent hemorrhage at cesarean delivery: a randomized study. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2005;192:1404-6.
WHO 1999:400/600PO vs U {published data only}
WHO 2001:600PO vs U {published data only}
  • Gulmezoglu AM, Villar J, Ngoc NTN, Piaggio G, Carroli G, Adetoro L, et al. WHO multicentre randomised trial of misoprostol in the management of the third stage of labour. Lancet 2001;358:689-95.
  • Lumbiganon P, Villar J, Piaggio G, Gulmezoglu AM, Adetoro L, Carroli G. Side effects of oral misoprostol during the first 24 hours after administration in the third stage of labour. BJOG: an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology 2002;109:1222-6.
Zim 2001:400PO vs U {published data only}

References to studies excluded from this review

  1. Top of page
  2. AbstractRésumé
  3. Background
  4. Objectives
  5. Methods
  6. Results
  7. Discussion
  8. Authors' conclusions
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. Data and analyses
  11. Appendices
  12. Contributions of authors
  13. Declarations of interest
  14. Sources of support
  15. Differences between protocol and review
  16. Characteristics of studies
  17. References to studies included in this review
  18. References to studies excluded from this review
  19. References to studies awaiting assessment
  20. References to ongoing studies
  21. Additional references
  22. References to other published versions of this review
Al-Harazi 2009 {published data only}
  • Al-Harazi AH, Frass KA. Sublingual misoprostol for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. Saudi Medical Journal 2009;30(7):912-6.
Chandhiok 2006 {published data only}
  • Chandhiok N, Dhillon BS, Datey S, Mathur A, Saxena NC. Oral misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage by paramedical workers in India. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2006;92(2):170-5.
Chandra 2004 {published data only}
  • Chandra S, Persad V, Young D, Baskett T. A preliminary study of cutaneous blood flow associated with postpartum use of oral misoprostol. Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology Canada: JOGC 2004;26(12):1073-6.
Daly 1999 {published data only}
  • Daly S, Andolina K, Tolosa JE, Roberts N, Wapner R. A randomized controlled trial of misoprostol versus oxytocin in preventing postpartum blood loss. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1999;180(1 Pt 2):S68.
Diab 1999 {published data only}
  • Diab KM, Ramy AR, Yehia MA. The use of rectal misoprostol as active pharmacological management of the third stage of labor. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research 1999;25(5):327-32.
Dickinson 2009 {published data only}
  • Dickinson JE, Doherty DA. Optimization of third-stage management after second-trimester medical pregnancy termination. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology 2009;201(3):303.e1-7.
Elati 2011 {published data only}
Jiang 2001 {published data only}
  • Jiang Q, Wang P, Cao W. Effect on different doses of misoprostol to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Chinese Nursing Research 2001;15(6):313-4.
Jin 2000 {published data only}
  • Jin LJ, Zhou L. Application of anus misoprostol to decrease the volume of post partum hemorrhage. Journal of Practical Nursing 2000;16(2):9-10.
Jirakulsawas 2000 {published data only}
  • Jirakulsawas J, Khooarmompattana S. Comparison of oral misoprostol and intramuscular methylergonovine for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. Thai Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2000;12(4):332.
Khan 2003 {published data only}
Khanun 2011 {published data only}
  • Khanun A, Khanum S. Oral versus rectal misoprostol in the prevention of primary postpartum hemorrage. Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences 2011;5(3):587-8.
Kumar 2011 {published data only}
  • Kumar S. A study to determine the efficacy of 600 mcg misoprostol in prevention of post partum haemorrhage. 54th All India Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; 2011 January 5-9; Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. 2011:305.
Kushtagi 2006 {published data only}
Leader 2002 {published data only}
  • Leader J, Bujnovsky M, Carlan SJ, Triana T, Richichi K. Effect of oral misoprostol after second-trimester delivery: a randomized, blinded study. Obstetrics & Gynecology 2002;100(4):689-94.
Li 2002 {published data only}
  • Li X, Wang H, Wang J, Cao X L, Ma Y. Prophylactic and therapeutic effect of misoprofil plus oxytocin on postpartum hemorrhage in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension syndrome. Journal of Postgraduates of Medicine 2002;25(7):34-5.
Li 2003 {published data only}
  • Li DP, Bei HZ. Clinical study on reduction of postpartum bleeding in the risk factors by misoprostol. Hainan Medical Journal 2003;14(11):11-2.
Lokugamage 2000 {published data only}
  • Lokugamage AU, Paine M, Bassau-Balroop H, El-Refaey K, Sullivan K, Rodek C. Active management of the third stage at caesarean section: misoprostol vs syntocinon. XVI FIGO World Congress of Obstetrics & Gynecology (Book 2); 2000 Sept 3-8; Washington DC, USA. 2000:54.
Mansouri 2011 {published data only}
  • Mansouri HA, Alsahly N. Rectal versus oral misoprostol for active management of third stage of labor: a randomized controlled trial. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2011;283(5):935-9.
Parsons 2006 {published data only}
  • Parsons SM, Walley RL, Crane JM, Matthews K, Hutchens D. Oral misoprostol versus oxytocin in the management of the third stage of labour. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada 2006;28(1):20-6.
Prata 2005 {published data only}
Rajbhandari 2010 {published data only}
  • Rajbhandari S, Hodgins S, Sanghvi H, McPherson R, Pradhan YV, Baqui AH. Expanding uterotonic protection following childbirth through community-based distribution of misoprostol: Operations research study in Nepal. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 2010;108(3):282-8.
Ray 2001 {published data only}
  • Chatterjee A. Misoprostol and the 3rd stage. XVI FIGO World Congress of Obstetrics & Gynecology (Book 4); 2000 Sept 3-8; Washington DC, USA. 2000:29.
  • Ray A, Mukherjee P, Basu G, Chatterjee A. Misoprostol and third stage of labour. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India 2001;51(6):53-4.
Rogers 2007 {published data only}
  • Rogers MS, Yuen PM, Wong S. Avoiding manual removal of placenta: evaluation of intra-umbilical injection of uterotonics using the pipingas technique for management of adherent placenta. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 2007;86(1):48-54.
Sanghvi 2010 {published data only}
  • Sanghvi H, Ansari N, Prata NJV, Gibson H, Ehsan A, Smith JM. Prevention of postpartum hemorrhage at home birth in Afghanistan. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2010;108:276-81.
Shrivasatava 2012 {published data only}
  • Shrivasatava DD, Khamsara D. Critical evaluation of sublingual misoprostol and methyl ergometrine in active management of third stage of labour. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;119(Suppl 3):S484.
Soltan 2009 {published data only}
Tripti 2009 {published data only}
  • Tripti N, Balram S. 400 ug oral misoprostol versus 0.2mg intravenous methyl ergometrine for the active management of third stage of labor. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India 2009;59(3):228-34.
van Beekhuizen 2009 {published data only}
  • van Beekhuizen HJ, Pembe AB, Fauteck H, Lotgering FK. Treatment of retained placenta with misoprostol: a randomised controlled trial in a low-resource setting (Tanzania). BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2009;9:48.
Van Stralen 2013 {published data only}
  • Van Stralen G. Misoprostol in the management of retained placenta - a safe alternative for manual removal? A randomised controlled trial. Current Controlled Trials (www.controlled-trials.com/) (accessed 30 October 2007).
  • Van Stralen G, Veenhof M, Holleboom C, Van Roosmalen J. No reduction of manual removal after misoprostol for retained placenta: a double-blind, randomized trial. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 2013;92(4):398-403.
Vogel 2004 {published data only}
  • Vogel D, Burkhardt T, Rentsch K, Schweer H, Watzer B, Zimmerman R, et al. Misoprostol versus methylergometrine: pharmacokinetics in human milk. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2004;191:2168-73.
Xu 2003 {published data only}
  • Xu H. Misoprostol on preventing postpartum bleeding in cesarean. Hebei Medicine 2003;9(9):806-7.
Yan 2000 {published data only}
  • Yan WG, Ling MX, Mao HY. Clinical study on reduction of postpartum bleeding in cesarean operation by misoprostol. Journal of Zhenjiang Medical College 2000;10(3):440-1.
Zhao 1998 {published data only}
  • Zhao Y, Li X, Peng Y. Clinical study on reduction of postpartum bleeding in cesarean section by misoprostol. Chung-Hua Fu Chan Ko Tsa Chih [Chinese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology] 1998;33:403-5.

References to studies awaiting assessment

  1. Top of page
  2. AbstractRésumé
  3. Background
  4. Objectives
  5. Methods
  6. Results
  7. Discussion
  8. Authors' conclusions
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. Data and analyses
  11. Appendices
  12. Contributions of authors
  13. Declarations of interest
  14. Sources of support
  15. Differences between protocol and review
  16. Characteristics of studies
  17. References to studies included in this review
  18. References to studies excluded from this review
  19. References to studies awaiting assessment
  20. References to ongoing studies
  21. Additional references
  22. References to other published versions of this review
Adanikin 2012 {published data only}
  • Adanikin AI, Orji EO, Adanikin PO, Olaniyan O. Comparative study of rectal misoprostol to oxytocin infusion in preventing postpartum haemorrhage post-caesarean section. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;119(Suppl 3):S825.
  • Adanikin AI, Orji EO, Fasubaa OB, Onwudiegwu U, Ijarotimi OA, Olaniyan O. The effect of post-cesarean rectal misoprostol on intestinal motility. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;119(2):159-62.
  • Orji EO, Adanikin AI. Prospective randomised double blind study on the effect of post-caesarean rectal misoprostol on intestinal motility. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;119(Suppl 3):S446-S447.
Beigi 2009 (Farsi) {published data only}
  • Beigi A, Tabarestani H, Moini A, Zarrinkoub F, Kazempour M, Hadian Amree A. [Sublingual misoprostol versus intravenous oxytocin in the management of postpartum hemorrhage]. Tehran University Medical Journal 2009;67(8):556-61.
Fawzy 2012 {published data only}
  • Fawzy AEMA, Swelem M, Abdelrehim AI, Titeli S, Elghazal ZS, El-Gahwagi MM, et al. Active management of third stage of labor by intravenous ergometrine and rectal versus sublingual misoprostol (a double-center study). Alexandria Journal of Medicine 2012;48(4):381-5.
Is 2012 {published data only}
  • Is S, Gr V, Keranahalli S. Comparison of intramuscular ergometrine and per rectal misoprostol for prophylaxis against atonic post patrum haemorrhage. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;119(Suppl 3):S797-8.

References to ongoing studies

  1. Top of page
  2. AbstractRésumé
  3. Background
  4. Objectives
  5. Methods
  6. Results
  7. Discussion
  8. Authors' conclusions
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. Data and analyses
  11. Appendices
  12. Contributions of authors
  13. Declarations of interest
  14. Sources of support
  15. Differences between protocol and review
  16. Characteristics of studies
  17. References to studies included in this review
  18. References to studies excluded from this review
  19. References to studies awaiting assessment
  20. References to ongoing studies
  21. Additional references
  22. References to other published versions of this review
Diop 2011 {published data only}
  • Diop AR, Frye LJ, Kone Y. Comparing misoprostol and oxytocin in unijectTM for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) prevention in Mali. ClinicalTrials.gov (accessed April 2013).
Kalahroudi 2010 {published data only}
  • Kalahroudi MA. Comparison of the effect of rectal misoprostol and syntometrin in prevention of post partum hemorrhage. IRCT Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (www.irct.ir) (accessed 6 December 2010).
Moradi 2010 {published data only}
  • Moradi S. Comparison of misoprostol and oxytocin in reduction of postpartum hemorrhage. IRCT Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (www.irct.ir) (accessed 6 December 2010).

Additional references

  1. Top of page
  2. AbstractRésumé
  3. Background
  4. Objectives
  5. Methods
  6. Results
  7. Discussion
  8. Authors' conclusions
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. Data and analyses
  11. Appendices
  12. Contributions of authors
  13. Declarations of interest
  14. Sources of support
  15. Differences between protocol and review
  16. Characteristics of studies
  17. References to studies included in this review
  18. References to studies excluded from this review
  19. References to studies awaiting assessment
  20. References to ongoing studies
  21. Additional references
  22. References to other published versions of this review
AbouZahar 2003
  • AbouZahar C, Wardlaw T. Maternal mortality in 2000: estimates developed by WHO, UNICEF and UNFPA. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO, 2003.
ACOG 2006
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. ACOG Practice Bulletin: Clinical Management Guidelines for Obstetrician-Gynecologists Number 76, October 2006: postpartum hemorrhage. Obstetrics and Gynecology 2006;108:1039-47.
Brecht 1987
  • Brecht T. Effects of misoprostol on human circulation. Prostaglandins 1987;33:S51-S60.
Chong 1997
  • Chong YS, Chua S, Arulkumaran S. Severe hyperthermia following oral misoprostol in the immediate postpartum period. Obstetrics and Gynecology 1997;90:703-4.
Echt 1991
  • Echt D, Liebson PR, Mitchell LB, Peters RW, Obias-Manno D, Barker AH, et al. Mortality and morbidity in patients receiving encainide, flecainide, or placebo. The Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial. New England Journal of Medicine 1991;324(12):781-8.
Elati 2012
  • Elati A, Weeks A. Risk of fever after misoprostol for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage: a meta-analysis. Obstetrics and Gynecology 2012;120(5):1140-8.
FIGO 2012a
  • International Federation Of Gynecology Obstetrics. Prevention of postpartum hemorrhage with misoprostol. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;119(3):213-4.
FIGO 2012b
  • International Federation Of Gynecology And Obstetrics. Treatment of postpartum hemorrhage with misoprostol. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2012;119(3):215-6.
Higgins 2011
  • Higgins JPT, Green S, editors. Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Version 5.1.0 [updated March 2011]. The Cochrane Collaboration, 2011. Available from www.cochrane-handbook.org.
Hofmeyr 1998
Hundley 2013
  • Hundley VA, Avan BI, Sullivan CJ, Graham WJ. Should oral misoprostol be used to prevent postpartum haemorrhage in home-birth settings in low-resource countries? A systematic review of the evidence. BJOG: an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology 2013;120(3):277-85.
Leduc 2009
  • Leduc D, Senikas V, Lalonde AB, Ballerman C, Biringer A, Delaney M, et al. Active management of the third stage of labour: prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada: JOGC 2009;31(10):980-93.
Lumbiganon 1999
  • Lumbiganon P, Hofmeyr J, Gulmezoglu AM, Villar J. Misoprostol dose-related shivering and pyrexia in the third stage of labour. WHO Collaborative Trial in the Management of the Third Stage of Labour. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1999;106:304-8.
Mousa 2007
Norman 1991
  • Norman JE, Thong KJ, Baird DT. Uterine contractility and induction of abortion in early pregnancy by misoprostol and mifepristone. Lancet 1991;338:1233-6.
Qian 1994
  • Qian YM, Jones RL, Chan KM, Stock AI, Ho JK. Potent contractile actions of prostanoid EP3-receptor agonists on human isolated pulmonary artery. British Journal of Pharmacology 1994;113(2):369-74.
RCOG 2009
  • Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. RCOG Green-top Guideline No. 52. RCOG: 2009.
RevMan 2011
  • The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration. Review Manager (RevMan). 5.1. Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration, 2011.
Smith 2013
  • Smith JM, Gubin R, Holston MM, Fullerton J, Prata N. Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage prevention at home birth: an integrative review of global implementation experience to date. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2013;13(1):44.
Sutherland 2010
  • Sutherland T, Meyer C, Bishai DM, Geller S, Miller S. Community-based distribution of misoprostol for treatment or prevention of postpartum hemorrhage: cost-effectiveness, mortality, and morbidity reduction analysis. International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 2010;108(3):289-94.
Tang 2013
  • Tang J, Kapp N, Dragoman M, de Souza JP. WHO recommendations for misoprostol use for obstetric and gynecologic indications. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2013 Feb 19. [Epub ahead of print].
Tuncalp 2012