This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (15 SEP 2014)

Intervention Review

Recombinant human growth hormone for treating burns and donor sites

  1. Roelf S Breederveld,
  2. Wim E Tuinebreijer*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Wounds Group

Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 25 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008990.pub2


How to Cite

Breederveld RS, Tuinebreijer WE. Recombinant human growth hormone for treating burns and donor sites. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD008990. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008990.pub2.

Author Information

  1. Red Cross Hospital, Surgery and Burn Centre, Beverwijk, NH, Netherlands

*Wim E Tuinebreijer, Surgery and Burn Centre, Red Cross Hospital, Vondellaan 13, Beverwijk, NH, 1942 LE, Netherlands. wetuineb@knmg.nl. wimtuinebreijer@telfort.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

SEARCH

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (15 SEP 2014)

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) increases protein synthesis, therefore it is used in burns with a total body surface area (TBSA) greater than 40%, where there is frequently an increase in protein breakdown and a decrease in protein synthesis. This change in protein metabolism correlates with poor wound healing of the burn and donor sites.

Objectives

To determine the effects of rhGH on the healing rate of burn wounds and donor sites in people with burns.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 28 June 2012); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 6); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3); Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to June Week 3 2012); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations June 27, 2012); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2012 Week 25); and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 21 June 2012).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing rhGH with any comparator intervention, e.g. oxandrolone or placebo, in adults or children with burns.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. The primary outcomes were the healing of the burn wound and donor sites and the occurrence of wound infections. The secondary outcomes were mortality rate, length of hospital stay, scar assessment, and adverse events: hyperglycaemia and septicaemia.

Main results

We included 13 RCTs (701 people). Six of the RCTs included only children aged 1 to 18 years and seven involved only adults (from 18 to 65 years of age). The mean TBSA of the included participants was greater than 49%. Twelve studies compared rhGH with placebo and one study compared rhGH with oxandrolone. Two trials found that compared with placebo, burn wounds in adults treated with rhGH healed more quickly (by 9.07 days; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.39 to 13.76, I² = 0%). The donor site healing time was significantly shorter in rhGH-treated adults compared with placebo-treated participants (by 3.15 days; 95% CI 1.54 to 4.75, I² = 0%). Two studies in children with the outcome of donor site healing time could be pooled and the donor site healing time was shorter in the rhGH-treated children (by 1.70 days; 95% CI 0.87 to 2.53, I² = 0%). No studies reporting the outcome of wound infection were found. The incidence of hyperglycaemia was higher in adults during rhGH treatment compared with placebo (risk ratio (RR) 2.43; 95% CI 1.54 to 3.85), but not in children. Pooling the studies of adults and children yielded a significantly higher incidence of hyperglycaemia in the rhGH-treated participants (RR 2.65; 95% CI 1.68 to 4.16).

Authors' conclusions

There is some evidence that using rhGH in people with large burns (more than 40% of the total body surface area) could result in more rapid healing of the burn wound and donor sites in adults and children, and in reduced length of hospital stay, without increased mortality or scarring, but with an increased risk of hyperglycaemia. This evidence is based on studies with small sample sizes and risk of bias and requires confirmation in higher quality, adequately powered trials.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Human growth hormone for treating burns and skin graft donor sites

Growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland. For decades, it could only be obtained by extraction from pituitary glands but more recently it has been produced through genetic engineering and made available for therapy as recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). The aim of this review was to determine the effects of rhGH when used to treat burns and skin graft donor sites and to determine its safety compared with other treatments.

A burn that affects more than 40% of total body surface area affects the entire body. In people with such large burns, metabolism increases, as represented by a higher heart rate. This state of increased metabolism is called hypermetabolism. Hypermetabolism consumes high levels of energy Part of this energy is obtained through the breakdown of the patient’s own muscles, which leads to wasting. This breaking down of tissues into smaller molecules to release energy is called catabolism. However, such catabolism does not provide sufficient energy for the hypermetabolic state. This shortage of energy and building molecules leads to prolonged burn wound and donor site healing. In children, this shortage also leads to growth retardation. This catabolic state can be treated with anabolic agents that reverse the protein breakdown. One of the anabolic agents recommended for such a treatment approach is recombinant growth hormone.

We found 13 eligible randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving 701 people for inclusion in this review. There is some evidence that recombinant growth hormone therapy in people with burns covering more than 40% of the total body surface area helps burn wounds and donor sites heal more rapidly and reduce the length of hospital stay, without increased mortality or increased scarring. We found it difficult to assess the quality of these studies due to poor reporting therefore we cannot be completely confident in their results.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Hormone de croissance humaine recombinante pour traiter les brûlures et les sites donneurs

Contexte

L'hormone de croissance humaine recombinante (rhGH) augmente la synthèse des protéines, par conséquent, elle est utilisée dans le cas des brûlures de plus de 40 % de la surface corporelle totale (SCT) où on observe souvent une augmentation de la dissociation des protéines et une baisse de la synthèse de protéines. Ce changement dans le métabolisme des protéines s'accompagne d'une mauvaise cicatrisation des brûlures et des sites donneurs.

Objectifs

Déterminer les effets de la rhGH sur la vitesse de cicatrisation des brûlures et des sites donneurs chez les personnes souffrant de brûlures.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les plaies et contusions (recherche datant du 28 juin 2012) ; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 6) ; la base des résumés des revues systématiques hors Cochrane (DARE) (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 3) ; Ovid MEDLINE (de 1950 à la 3ème semaine de juin 2012) ; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations le 27 juin 2012) ; Ovid EMBASE (de 1980 à la 25ème semaine de 2012) et EBSCO CINAHL (de 1982 au 21 juin 2012).

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant la rhGH à une intervention de comparaison, par ex. l'oxandrolone ou un placebo, chez l'adulte ou l'enfant souffrant de brûlures.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont sélectionné les études, évalué leur qualité méthodologique et extrait des données de manière indépendante. Les critères de jugement primaires étaient la cicatrisation des brûlures et des sites donneurs et les infections des plaies. Les critères de jugement secondaires étaient le taux de mortalité, la durée d'hospitalisation, l'évaluation des cicatrices et les événements indésirables : hyperglycémie et septicémie.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 13 ECR (soit 701 personnes). Six des ECR n'incluaient que des enfants de 1 à 18 ans et sept n'impliquaient que des adultes (de 18 à 65 ans). La SCT moyenne des participants inclus était supérieure à 49 %. Douze études comparaient la rhGH à un placebo et une étude comparait la rhGH à l'oxandrolone. Deux essais ont trouvé que, comparé au placebo, les brûlures chez l'adulte traité à la rhGH guérissaient plus rapidement (de 9,07 jours ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 4,39 à 13,76, I² = 0 %). Le temps de guérison des sites donneurs a été sensiblement plus court chez les adultes traités à la rhGH comparé aux participants traités avec un placebo (de 3,15 jours ; IC à 95 % 1,54 à 4,75, I² = 0 %). Deux études chez l'enfant avec le critère de jugement du temps de guérison des sites donneurs ont pu être combinées et le temps de guérison des sites donneurs a été plus court chez les enfants traités à la rhGH (de 1,70 jours ; IC à 95 % 0,87 à 2,53, I² = 0 %). Aucune étude rendant compte du critère de jugement d'infection des plaies n'a été trouvée. L'incidence de l'hyperglycémie a été plus élevée chez les adultes durant le traitement à la rhGH comparé au placebo (risque relatif (RR) 2,43 ; IC à 95 % 1,54 à 3,85), mais pas chez les enfants. Le regroupement des études chez l'adulte et l'enfant a donné une incidence de l'hyperglycémie sensiblement plus élevée chez les participants traités à la rhGH (RR 2,65 ; IC à 95 % 1,68 à 4,16).

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe des preuves indiquant que l'utilisation de la rhGH chez des personnes souffrant de brûlures étendues (plus de 40 % de la surface corporelle totale) pourrait entraîner une cicatrisation plus rapide des brûlures et des sites donneurs chez l'adulte et l'enfant, ainsi qu'une durée d'hospitalisation réduite, sans augmentation de la mortalité ou des cicatrices, mais avec un risque accru d'hyperglycémie. Ces preuves se basent sur des études ayant des échantillons de petite taille et présentant un risque de biais, et nécessitent une confirmation par des essais de meilleure qualité et d'une puissance adéquate.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Hormone de croissance humaine recombinante pour traiter les brûlures et les sites donneurs

Hormone de croissance humaine pour traiter les brûlures et les sites donneurs de lambeau cutané

L'hormone de croissance est produite par l'hypophyse. Pendant des décennies, elle n'a pu être obtenue que par extraction à partir d'hypophyses, mais depuis quelques années, elle est produite par génie génétique et est disponible pour les traitements sous la forme de l'hormone de croissance humaine recombinante (rhGH). L'objectif de cette revue était de déterminer les effets de la rhGH lorsqu'elle est utilisée pour traiter les brûlures et les sites donneurs de lambeau cutané et de déterminer son innocuité comparé à d'autres traitements.

Une brûlure qui touche plus de 40 % de la surface corporelle totale affecte le corps entier. Chez les personnes souffrant de ce type de brûlures étendues, le métabolisme augmente, comme cela est indiqué par une fréquence cardiaque plus rapide. Cet état de métabolisme accru s'appelle l'hypermétabolisme. L'hypermétabolisme consomme d'importantes quantités d'énergie. Une partie de cette énergie est obtenue par la rupture des propres muscles du patient, ce qui entraîne une émaciation. Cette dissociation des tissus en molécules plus petites pour libérer de l'énergie est appelée le catabolisme. Cependant, ce catabolisme ne fournit pas suffisamment d'énergie pour l'état hypermétabolique. Cette pénurie d'énergie et de molécules plateforme conduit à des brûlures prolongées et à un allongement de la guérison des sites donneurs. Chez l'enfant, cette pénurie conduit également à un retard de croissance. Cet état catabolique peut être traité avec des agents anabolisants qui inversent la dissociation des protéines. L'un des agents anabolisants recommandés pour cette approche de traitement est l'hormone de croissance recombinante.

Nous avons trouvé 13 essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) impliquant 701 participants pouvant être inclus dans cette revue. Il existe des preuves indiquant que le traitement à l'hormone de croissance humaine recombinante chez des personnes ayant des brûlures recouvrant plus de 40 % de la surface corporelle totale permet aux brûlures et aux sites donneurs de guérir plus rapidement et réduit la durée de l'hospitalisation, sans accroître la mortalité ou augmenter les cicatrices. Il nous a été difficile d'évaluer la qualité de ces études en raison de l'insuffisance des données rapportées, par conséquent, nous ne pouvons avoir une totale confiance dans leurs résultats.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th January, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�