Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Rapid diagnostic tests versus clinical diagnosis for managing people with fever in malaria endemic settings

  1. John Odaga1,*,
  2. David Sinclair2,
  3. Joseph A Lokong3,
  4. Sarah Donegan2,
  5. Heidi Hopkins4,5,
  6. Paul Garner2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 17 APR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 JAN 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008998.pub2


How to Cite

Odaga J, Sinclair D, Lokong JA, Donegan S, Hopkins H, Garner P. Rapid diagnostic tests versus clinical diagnosis for managing people with fever in malaria endemic settings. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD008998. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008998.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Uganda Martyrs University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda

  2. 2

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Liverpool, UK

  3. 3

    AVSI Foundation (Uganda), AVSI-NUHITES Health Project, Kampala, Uganda

  4. 4

    Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND), Kampala, Uganda

  5. 5

    Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND), Geneva, Switzerland

*John Odaga, Faculty of Health Sciences, Uganda Martyrs University, PO BOX 5498, Kampala, Uganda. jodaga@liverpool.ac.uk. jodaga@umu.ac.ug.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 17 APR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

In 2010, the World Health Organization recommended that all patients with suspected malaria are tested for malaria before treatment. In rural African settings light microscopy is often unavailable. Diagnosis has relied on detecting fever, and most people were given antimalarial drugs presumptively. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) provide a point-of-care test that may improve management, particularly of people for whom the RDT excludes the diagnosis of malaria.

Objectives

To evaluate whether introducing RDTs into algorithms for diagnosing and treating people with fever improves health outcomes, reduces antimalarial prescribing, and is safe, compared to algorithms using clinical diagnosis.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; LILACS; and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials for eligible trials up to 10 January 2014. We contacted researchers in the field and reviewed the reference lists of all included trials to identify any additional trials.

Selection criteria

Individual or cluster randomized trials (RCTs) comparing RDT-supported algorithms and algorithms using clinical diagnosis alone for diagnosing and treating people with fever living in malaria-endemic settings.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and extracted data. We combined data from individually and cluster RCTs using the generic inverse variance method. We presented all outcomes as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach.

Main results

We included seven trials, enrolling 17,505 people with fever or reported history of fever in this review; two individually randomized trials and five cluster randomized trials. All trials were conducted in rural African settings.

In most trials the health workers diagnosing and treating malaria were nurses or clinical officers with less than one week of training in RDT supported diagnosis. Health worker prescribing adherence to RDT results was highly variable: the number of participants with a negative RDT result who received antimalarials ranged from 0% to 81%.

Overall, RDT supported diagnosis had little or no effect on the number of participants remaining unwell at four to seven days after treatment (6990 participants, five trials, low quality evidence); but using RDTs reduced prescribing of antimalarials by up to three-quarters (17,287 participants, seven trials, moderate quality evidence). As would be expected, the reduction in antimalarial prescriptions was highest where health workers adherence to the RDT result was high, and where the true prevalence of malaria was lower.

Using RDTs to support diagnosis did not have a consistent effect on the prescription of antibiotics, with some trials showing higher antibiotic prescribing and some showing lower prescribing in the RDT group (13,573 participants, five trials, very low quality evidence).

One trial reported malaria microscopy on all enrolled patients in an area of moderate endemicity, so we could compare the number of patients in the RDT and clinical diagnosis groups that actually had microscopy confirmed malaria infection but did not receive antimalarials. No difference was detected between the two diagnostic strategies (1280 participants, one trial, low quality evidence).

Authors' conclusions

Algorithms incorporating RDTs can substantially reduce antimalarial prescribing if health workers adhere to the test results. Introducing RDTs has not been shown to improve health outcomes for patients, but adherence to the test result does not seem to result in worse clinical outcomes than presumptive treatment.

Concentrating on improving the care of RDT negative patients could improve health outcomes in febrile children.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Rapid diagnostic tests versus clinical diagnosis for managing fever in settings where malaria is common

Cochrane Collaboration researchers conducted a review of the effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for diagnosing malaria in areas where diagnosis has traditionally been based on clinical symptoms alone. After searching for relevant trials, they included seven randomized controlled trials, which enrolled 17,505 people with fever.

What are RDTs and how might they improve patient care

RDTs are simple to use diagnostic kits which can detect the parasites that cause malaria from one drop of the patient's blood. They do not require laboratory facilities or extensive training, and can provide a simple positive or negative result within 20 minutes, making them suitable for use in rural areas of Africa where most malaria cases occur.

Improving malaria diagnosis by introducing RDTs is unlikely to improve the health outcomes of people with true malaria as they would probably have received antimalarials even if the health worker was relying on clinical symptoms alone. However, for patients with fever not due to malaria, RDTs could improve health outcomes by prompting the health worker to look for and treat the true cause of their fever earlier.

What the research says

In these trials, diagnosis using RDTs had little or no effect on the number of people remaining unwell four to seven days after treatment (low quality evidence).

However, using RDTs reduced the prescription of antimalarials by up to three-quarters (moderate quality evidence), and this reduction was highest where health workers only prescribed antimalarials following a positive test, and where malaria was less common.

Using RDTs to support diagnosis did not have a consistent effect on the prescription of antibiotics, with some trials showing an increase in antibiotic prescription and some showing a decrease (very low quality evidence).

Use of RDTs did not result in more patients with malaria being incorrectly diagnosed as not having malaria and being sent home without treatment (low quality evidence).

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les tests de diagnostic rapide par rapport au diagnostic clinique pour la prise en charge des patients fiévreux dans des environnements où le paludisme est endémique

Contexte

En 2010, l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé recommandait que tous les patients avec une suspicion de paludisme soient dépistés pour le paludisme avant le traitement. Dans des zones rurales d'Afrique, la microscopie n'est souvent pas disponible. Le diagnostic se basait sur la détection de la fièvre et la plupart des patients recevaient des médicaments antipaludiques par supposition. Les tests de diagnostic rapide (TDR) offrent une analyse sur les lieux d'intervention qui pourrait améliorer la prise en charge, en particulier chez les patients pour lesquels les TDR exclus le diagnostic de paludisme.

Objectifs

Évaluer si l'introduction d'algorithmes utilisant des TDR pour diagnostiquer et traiter les patients fiévreux améliore les résultats cliniques, réduit la prescription d'antipaludiques et est sûre, par rapport aux algorithmes utilisant un diagnostic clinique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses; CENTRAL (La Bibliothèque Cochrane), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS et le méta-registre des essais contrôlés pour identifier des essais éligibles jusqu'au 10 janvier 2014. Nous avons contacté des chercheurs dans le domaine et examiné les références bibliographiques de tous les essais inclus pour identifier des essais supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

Essais randomisés individuels ou en cluster (ECR) comparant des algorithmes utilisant les TDR aux algorithmes utilisant un diagnostic clinique seul pour diagnostiquer et traiter les patients fiévreux vivant dans des environnements où le paludisme est endémique.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment appliqué les critères d'inclusion et extrait les données. Nous avons combiné les données d'ECR individuels et en cluster en utilisant la méthode de variance inverse générique. Nous avons présenté les résultats sous forme de risques relatifs (RR) avec des intervalles de confiance à 95 % (IC) et évalué la qualité des preuves en utilisant l'approche GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus sept essais, portant sur 17 505 patients fiévreux ou rapportant des antécédents de fièvre dans cette revue; deux essais randomisés individuellement et cinq essais randomisés en cluster. Tous les essais ont été menés dans des environnements ruraux d'Afrique.

Dans la plupart des essais, les professionnels de la santé diagnostiquant et traitant le paludisme étaient des infirmiers ou des assistants cliniques avec moins d'une semaine de formation pour effectuer un diagnostic par TDR. L'adhésion des professionnels de la santé à prescrire selon les résultats des TDR variait énormément : le nombre de participants présentant un résultat négatif au TDR ayant reçu les antipaludéens variait de 0 % à 81 %.

Dans l'ensemble, le diagnostic soutenu par les TDR n'avait que peu ou pas d'effet sur le nombre de participants restant malades de quatre à sept jours après le traitement (6 990 participants, cinq essais, preuves de faible qualité ); mais l'utilisation des TDR réduisait la prescription de médicaments antipaludiques jusqu'à trois quarts (17 287 participants, sept essais, preuves de qualité modérée ). Comme prévu, la réduction des prescriptions antipaludiques était plus élevée lorsque l'adhésion des professionnels de la santé à prescrire selon les résultats des TDR était élevée et où la véritable prévalence du paludisme était plus faible.

L'utilisation des TDR pour confirmer le diagnostic n'avait pas d'effet constant sur la prescription d'antibiotiques, avec certains essais montrant une prescription d'antibiotiques plus élevée et certains montrant une prescription plus faible dans le groupe des TDR (13 573 participants, cinq essais, preuves de très faible qualité ).

Un essai rapportait le paludisme par microscopie chez tous les patients recrutés dans une zone d'endémicité modérée, nous pouvions donc comparer le nombre de patients dans les groupes de TDR et de diagnostic clinique qui étaient atteints de paludisme confirmé par microscopie, mais n'avaient pas reçu d'antipaludéens. Aucune différence n'était détectée entre les deux stratégies de diagnostic (1 280 participants, un essai, preuves de faible qualité ).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les algorithmes incorporant des TDR peuvent réduire substantiellement la prescription d'antipaludiques lorsque les professionnels de la santé adhèrent aux résultats du test. L'introduction des TDR n'a pas démontré améliorer l'état de santé des patients, mais l'adhésion aux résultats des tests ne semblait pas aggraver les résultats cliniques comparés au traitement présomptif.

Se concentrer sur l'amélioration des soins des patients négatifs aux TDR pourrait améliorer l'état de santé des enfants fébriles.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les tests de diagnostic rapide par rapport au diagnostic clinique pour la prise en charge des patients fiévreux dans des environnements où le paludisme est endémique

Les tests de diagnostic rapide par rapport au diagnostic clinique pour la prise en charge de la fièvre dans des environnements où le paludisme est fréquent

Des chercheurs de la Collaboration Cochrane ont effectué une revue des effets de l'introduction de tests de diagnostic rapide (TDR) pour diagnostiquer le paludisme dans les régions où le diagnostic se base traditionnellement sur les seuls symptômes cliniques. Après avoir recherché des essais pertinents, ils ont inclus sept essais contrôlés randomisés, qui portaient sur 17 505 patients fiévreux.

Que sont les TDR et comment pourraient-ils améliorer les soins des patients

Les TDR sont des kits de diagnostic faciles à utiliser qui peuvent détecter les parasites causant le paludisme à partir d'une goutte de sang du patient. Ils ne nécessitent ni de laboratoire ni de formation approfondie et peuvent fournir un simple résultat positif ou négatif en 20 minutes, les rendant utilisables dans les zones rurales d'Afrique où la plupart des cas de paludisme se produisent.

Améliorer le diagnostic du paludisme en introduisant les TDR est peu susceptible d'améliorer l'état de santé des patients véritablement atteints de paludisme, car ils recevraient probablement des antipaludiques, même lorsqu'un professionnel de la santé se fie uniquement aux symptômes cliniques. Toutefois, pour les patients atteints de fièvre qui n'est pas due au paludisme, les TDR pourraient améliorer les résultats sur la santé en incitant le professionnel de la santé à identifier et à traiter plus tôt la véritable cause de la fièvre.

Ce que disent les recherches

Dans ces essais, le diagnostic utilisant des TDR n'avait que peu ou pas d'effet sur le nombre de patients restants malades quatre à sept jours après le traitement (preuves de faible qualité ).

Cependant, l'utilisation des TDR réduisait la prescription de médicaments antipaludiques jusqu'à trois quarts (preuves de qualité modérée ) et cette réduction était plus élevée lorsque les professionnels de la santé prescrivaient uniquement des antipaludiques après un test positif, et où le paludisme était moins fréquent.

L'utilisation des TDR pour confirmer le diagnostic n'avait pas d'effet constant sur la prescription d'antibiotiques, avec certains essais montrant une augmentation de la prescription d'antibiotiques et certains montrant une diminution (preuves de très faible qualité ).

L'utilisation des TDR n'a pas entraîné davantage de patients atteints de paludisme à être incorrectement diagnostiqués comme ne souffrant pas de paludisme et à être renvoyés à leur domicile sans traitement (preuves de faible qualité ).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 6th August, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé