Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions for hiring, retaining and training district health systems managers in low- and middle-income countries

  1. Peter C Rockers1,*,
  2. Till Bärnighausen1,2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group

Published Online: 30 APR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009035.pub2


How to Cite

Rockers PC, Bärnighausen T. Interventions for hiring, retaining and training district health systems managers in low- and middle-income countries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD009035. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009035.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Harvard University, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

  2. 2

    University of KwaZulu-Natal, Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, Mtubatuba, South Africa

*Peter C Rockers, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, 667 Huntington Ave., Boston, Massachusetts, 02115, USA. prockers@hsph.harvard.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 30 APR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

District managers are playing an increasingly important role in determining the performance of health systems in low- and middle-income countries as a result of decentralization.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of interventions to hire, retain and train district health systems managers in low- and middle-income countries.

Search methods

We searched a wide range of international databases, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. We also searched online resources of international agencies, including the World Bank, to find relevant grey literature. Searches were conducted in December 2011.

Selection criteria

District health systems managers are those persons who are responsible for overseeing the operations of the health system within a defined, subnational geographical area that is designated as a district. Hiring and retention interventions include those that aim to increase the attractiveness of district management positions, as well as those related to hiring and retention processes, such as private contracting. Training interventions include education programs to develop future managers and on-the-job training programs for current managers. To be included, studies needed to use one of the following study designs: randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized controlled trial, controlled before-and-after study, and interrupted time series analysis.

Data collection and analysis

We report measures of effect in the same way that the primary study authors have reported them. Due to the varied nature of interventions included in this review we could not pool data across studies.

Main results

Two studies met our inclusion criteria. The findings of one study conducted in Cambodia provide low quality evidence that private contracts with international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) for district health systems management ('contracting-in') may improve health care access and utilization. Contracting-in increased use of antenatal care by 28% and use of public facilities by 14%. However, contracting-in was not found to have an effect on population health outcomes. The findings of the other study provide low quality evidence that intermittent training courses over 18 months may improve district health system managers’ performance. In three countries in Latin America, managers who did not receive the intermittent training courses had between 2.4 and 8.3 times more management deficiencies than managers who received the training courses. No studies that aimed to investigate interventions for retaining district health systems managers met our study selection criteria for inclusion in this review.

Authors' conclusions

There is low quality evidence that contracting-in may improve health care accessibility and utilization and that intermittent training courses may improve district health systems managers’ performance. More evidence is required before firm conclusions can be drawn regarding the effectiveness of these interventions in diverse settings. Other interventions that might be promising candidates for hiring and retaining (e.g., government regulations, professional support programs) as well as training district health systems managers (e.g., in-service workshops with on-site support) have not been adequately investigated.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions to hire, retain and train district health systems managers

Researchers in the Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of the effect of interventions to hire, retain and train district health systems managers in low- and middle-income countries. After searching for all relevant studies, they found only two that met their prespecified study selection criteria.

Interventions to hire, retain and train district health systems managers

In many low- and middle-income countries, the responsibility for managing important aspects of the health services are being decentralized to local governing bodies, including district health teams. As a result, district health systems managers are playing an increasingly important role.

A district manager is responsible for overseeing the operations of the health system within a particular subnational geographical area. District health systems managers are often responsible for planning and budgeting, human resources management and service quality monitoring. Poor performance by a district manager can lead to a number of problems, such as lack of drugs and supplies, delayed repair of broken equipment, health worker absenteeism and lack of motivation among health workers.

Different approaches are used to improve the quality of district managers.  Some of these approaches address the way in which managers are hired and retained, for instance by making district management positions more attractive or by giving contracts ('contracting-in') to private, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Other approaches focus on the training and education of managers. All of these approaches aim to improve the quality of the health system and thereby the health of the population.

What happens when efforts are made to hire, retain and train district health systems managers?

It is difficult to draw any conclusions about the effects of these types of interventions as the review only found two relevant studies. In addition, the evidence that the review did identify was of low quality.

Training: The available evidence suggests that in-service district manager training:

·       may lead to more knowledge about planning processes 

·       may lead to better monitoring and evaluation skills

None of the studies assessed the effects of district manager training on people’s health, on their access to or use of health care, or on the quality or efficiency of care.

Contracting-in: The available evidence suggests that private contracts with international NGOs for district health systems management:

·       may not affect people’s illness reporting, diarrhea incidence or infant death

·       may increase the likelihood that a health facility is open 24 hours

·       may increase the availability of medical equipment and supplies

·       may increase people’s use of antenatal care and public facilities

None of the studies assessed the effects of contracting-in district management on the quality or efficiency of health care, on job vacancy rates, or on district manager knowledge and skills.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour le recrutement, le maintien et la formation de responsables de santé de district dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu

Contexte

Avec la décentralisation, le rôle des responsables de district est de plus en plus déterminant pour ce qui est des performances des systèmes de santé dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des interventions visant au recrutement, au maintien et à la formation des responsables de santé de district dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans un large éventail de bases de données internationales, notamment le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE et EMBASE. Nous avons également cherché dans les ressources en ligne d'agences internationales, dont la Banque mondiale, afin de trouver de la littérature grise pertinente. Les recherches ont été menées en décembre 2011.

Critères de sélection

Les responsables des systèmes de santé de district sont des personnes chargées de superviser les activités du système de santé dans une zone géographique définie du pays, désignée par le terme de district. Les interventions de recrutement et de maintien comprennent celles qui visent à accroître l'attractivité des postes de responsable de district, ainsi que celles liées aux processus de recrutement et de maintien, telles que la sous-traitance à des organismes privés. Les interventions de formation comprennent des programmes éducatifs destinés à préparer de futurs responsables et des programmes de formation continue pour les responsables en place. Pour être incluses, les études devaient avoir utilisé un des modèles suivants : essai contrôlé randomisé, essai contrôlé non randomisé, étude contrôlée avant-après et analyse de séries temporelles interrompues.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous rapportons les mesures d'effet de la même manière que les auteurs originels de l'étude l'ont fait. Vue la nature variée des interventions incluses dans cette revue, nous n'avons pas pu regrouper les données de plusieurs études.

Résultats Principaux

Deux études répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Les résultats d'une étude menée au Cambodge fournissent des preuves de faible qualité que les contrats privés avec des organisations non gouvernementales (ONG) internationales pour la gestion de systèmes de santé au niveau du district (sous-traitance), peut améliorer l'accès aux soins de santé et leur utilisation. La sous-traitance avait accru l'utilisation des soins prénataux de 28 % et l'utilisation des établissements publics de 14 %. Toutefois, la sous-traitance ne s'est pas avérée avoir un effet perceptible sur ​​la santé de la population. Les résultats de l'autre étude fournissent des preuves de faible qualité que les cours de formation intermittents sur une période de 18 mois peuvent améliorer les performances des responsables de santé de district. Dans trois pays d'Amérique latine, les responsables qui n'avaient pas reçu les cours de formation intermittente présentaient entre 2,4 et 8,3 fois plus de lacunes de gestion que les responsables ayant bénéficié de cours de formation. Aucune étude portant sur les interventions de maintien des responsables de santé de district ne répondait à nos critères de sélection pour inclusion dans cette revue.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il y a des preuves de faible qualité que la sous-traitance est susceptible d'améliorer l'accessibilité aux soins de santé et leur utilisation, et que les cours de formation intermittente pourraient améliorer les performances des responsables de santé de district. Des données supplémentaires seront nécessaires pour que des conclusions définitives puissent être tirées quant à l'efficacité de ces interventions dans divers contextes. D'autres interventions susceptibles d'être prometteuses pour le recrutement et le maintien (p.ex. des réglementations gouvernementales ou des programmes de soutien professionnel), ainsi que pour la formation des responsables de santé de district (p.ex. des ateliers de formation continue avec soutien sur place) n'ont pas été suffisamment étudiées.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour le recrutement, le maintien et la formation de responsables de santé de district dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu

Interventions pour aider à recruter, retenir et former des responsables de santé de district

Les chercheurs de la Cochrane Collaboration ont procédé à une revue de l'effet des interventions visant au recrutement, au maintien et à la formation de responsables de santé de district dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu. Ils ont recherché toutes les études pertinentes mais n'en ont finalement trouvé que deux répondant aux critères de sélection pré-établis.

Interventions pour aider à recruter, conserver et former des responsables de santé de district

Dans de nombreux pays à faible et moyen revenu, la responsabilité d'importants aspects des services de santé a été décentralisée vers des entités locales, notamment des équipes de santé de district. En conséquence, les responsables de santé au niveau du district jouent un rôle de plus en plus important.

Un responsable de district est chargé de superviser les activités du système de santé dans une région géographique particulière du pays. Les responsables de santé de district sont souvent responsables de la planification et de la budgétisation, de la gestion des ressources humaines et du contrôle de la qualité du service. Si un chef de district est insuffisamment efficace cela peut entraîner un certain nombre de problèmes, comme un manque de médicaments et de fournitures, des retards à la réparation d'équipements abimés, l'absentéisme d'agents de santé et un manque de motivation parmi les agents de santé.

Différentes approches sont utilisées pour améliorer la qualité des responsables de district. Certaines de ces approches traitent de la manière dont les responsables sont recrutés et conservés, par exemple en rendant les postes de responsables de district plus attrayants ou en sous-traitant à des organisations non gouvernementales (ONG) privées. D'autres approches mettent l'accent sur la formation et l'éducation des responsables. Toutes ces approches visent à améliorer la qualité du système de santé et, partant, la santé de la population.

Qu'advient-il lorsque des efforts sont faits pour recruter, retenir et former des responsables de santé de district ?

Il est difficile de tirer des conclusions sur les effets de ces types d'interventions car la revue n'a trouvé que deux études pertinentes. De plus, les données que la revue a pu identifier étaient de mauvaise qualité.

Formation : Les données disponibles suggèrent que la formation continue des responsables de district :

·       peut permettre une meilleure connaissance des processus de planification 

·       peut améliorer les compétences en matière de contrôle et d'évaluation

Aucune des études n'avait évalué les effets de la formation du responsable de district sur ​​la santé des gens, sur leur accès aux soins de santé ou leur utilisation de ceux-ci, ou sur la qualité ou l'efficacité des soins.

Sous-traitance : Les données disponibles suggèrent que sous-traiter à des ONG internationales la responsabilité de systèmes de santé au niveau du district :

·       n'aurait pas d'influence sur le signalement de maladies par les gens, l'incidence de la diarrhée ou la mortalité infantile

·       pourrait augmenter la probabilité qu'un établissement de santé soit ouvert 24 heures sur 24

·       pourrait accroitre la disponibilité des équipements médicaux et des fournitures

·       pourrait accroitre l'utilisation par les gens des soins prénataux et des établissements publics

Aucune des études n'avait évalué les effets de la sous-traitance de responsabilité au niveau du district sur ​​la qualité ou l'efficacité des soins de santé, sur les taux de vacance de postes, ou sur les connaissances et les compétences du responsable de district.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th July, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.