Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Breathing exercises for dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome in adults

  1. Mandy Jones1,*,
  2. Alex Harvey1,
  3. Louise Marston2,
  4. Neil E O'Connell3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Airways Group

Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 26 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009041.pub2


How to Cite

Jones M, Harvey A, Marston L, O'Connell NE. Breathing exercises for dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD009041. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009041.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Brunel University, School of Health Sciences and Social Care, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK

  2. 2

    University College London, Research Department of Primary Care & Population Health, Division of Population Health, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, London, UK

  3. 3

    Brunel University, Centre for Research in Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences and Social Care, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK

*Mandy Jones, School of Health Sciences and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH, UK. mandy.jones@brunel.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome (DB/HVS) is a respiratory disorder, psychologically or physiologically based, involving breathing too deeply and/or too rapidly (hyperventilation) or erratic breathing interspersed with breath-holding or sighing (DB). DB/HVS can result in significant patient morbidity and an array of symptoms including breathlessness, chest tightness, dizziness, tremor and paraesthesia. DB/HVS has an estimated prevalence of 9.5% in the general adult population, however, there is little consensus regarding the most effective management of this patient group.

Objectives

1) To determine whether breathing exercises in patients with DB/HVS have beneficial effects as measured by quality of life indices

2) To determine whether there are any adverse effects of breathing exercises in patients with DB/HVS

Search methods

We identified trials for consideration using both electronic and manual search strategies. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and four other databases. The latest search was in February 2013.

Selection criteria

We planned to include randomised, quasi-randomised or cluster randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which breathing exercises, or a combined intervention including breathing exercises as a key component, were compared with either no treatment or another therapy that did not include breathing exercises in patients with DB/HVS. Observational studies, case studies and studies utilising a cross-over design were not eligible for inclusion.

We considered any type of breathing exercise for inclusion in this review, such as breathing control, diaphragmatic breathing, yoga breathing, Buteyko breathing, biofeedback-guided breathing modification, yawn/sigh suppression. Programs where exercises were either supervised or unsupervised were eligible as were relaxation techniques and acute-episode management, as long as it was clear that breathing exercises were a key component of the intervention.

We excluded any intervention without breathing exercises or where breathing exercises were not key to the intervention.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently checked search results for eligible studies, assessed all studies that appeared to meet the selection criteria and extracted data. We used standard procedures recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration.

Main results

We included a single RCT assessed at unclear risk of bias, which compared relaxation therapy (n = 15) versus relaxation therapy and breathing exercises (n = 15) and a no therapy control group (n = 15).

Quality of life was not an outcome measure in this RCT, and no numerical data or statistical analysis were presented in this paper. A significant reduction in the frequency and severity of hyperventilation attacks in the breathing exercise group compared with the control group was reported. In addition, a significant difference in frequency and severity of hyperventilation attacks between the breathing and relaxation group was reported. However, no information could be extracted from the paper regarding the size of the treatment effects.

Authors' conclusions

The results of this systematic review are unable to inform clinical practice, based on the inclusion of only one small, poorly reported RCT. There is no credible evidence regarding the effectiveness of breathing exercises for the clinical symptoms of DB/HVS. It is currently unknown whether these interventions offer any added value in this patient group or whether specific types of breathing exercise demonstrate superiority over others. Given that breathing exercises are frequently used to treat DB/HVS, there is an urgent need for further well designed clinical trials in this area. Future trials should conform to the CONSORT statement for standards of reporting and use appropriate, validated outcome measures. Trial reports should also ensure full disclosure of data for all important clinical outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Breathing exercises for dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome

Background
Dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome (DB/HVS) is a breathing problem that involves breathing too deeply and/or too rapidly (hyperventilation). There are many possible causes of DB/HVS and if left untreated it can lead to a variety of unpleasant symptoms such as breathlessness, dizziness, pins and needles and chest pain.

Review question
The aim of this review was to investigate whether breathing exercises are useful in the treatment of dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome. The overall aim of all breathing exercises is to teach the patient to breathe gently using the lower part of their chest, at a rate that matches their activity level.

Key results
Only one study met the criteria for inclusion in this review, in which participants also received relaxation therapy. This study had a small number of participants and provided very little detail as to how it was undertaken. Although the trial report suggested that breathing exercises may be beneficial in the treatment of this particular patient group no numerical data were presented so we could not be sure. No reliable conclusions can be drawn from this small, isolated study.

This Cochrane plain language summary is up to date as of February 2013.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Exercices de respiration pour le traitement du syndrome de respiration dysfonctionnelle/hyperventilation chez l'adulte

Contexte

Le syndrome de respiration dysfonctionnelle/hyperventilation (SRD/HV) est un trouble de la respiration, ayant une base psychologique ou physiologique, qui se caractérise par une respiration trop profonde et/ou trop rapide (hyperventilation) ou par une respiration erratique alternant avec un blocage de la respiration ou une poussée de soupirs (RD). Le SRD/HV peut entraîner une morbidité importante des patients et un éventail de symptômes comprenant l'essoufflement, les sensations d'oppression, les vertiges, les tremblements et la paresthésie. Le SRD/HV a une prévalence estimée de 9,5 % au sein de la population adulte générale. Le consensus est toutefois faible quant à la gestion la plus efficace de ce groupe de patients.

Objectifs

1) Déterminer si les exercices de respiration chez les patients souffrant du SRD/HV ont des effets bénéfiques tels que mesurés par les indices de qualité de vie

2) Déterminer s'il existe des effets indésirables des exercices de respiration chez les patients souffrant du SRD/HV

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons identifié les essais à prendre en compte en utilisant à la fois des recherches électroniques et des recherches manuelles. Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE et quatre autres bases de données. La dernière recherche a été effectuée en février 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avions prévu d'inclure des essais contrôlés randomisés, quasi-randomisés ou randomisés (ECR) en groupe dans lesquels des exercices de respiration, ou une intervention combinée comprenant des exercices de respiration en tant qu'élément clé, étaient comparés soit à l'absence de traitement soit à une autre thérapie qui ne comprenait pas d'exercices de respiration chez des patients souffrant du SRD/HV. Les études observationnelles, les études de cas et les études utilisant un plan croisé n'étaient pas éligibles pour l'inclusion.

Nous avons pris en considération tout type d'exercice de respiration pour l'inclusion dans cette revue, tel que le contrôle de la respiration, la respiration diaphragmatique, la respiration yoga, la respiration de Buteyko, la modification de la respiration guidée par rétroaction biologique et la suppression des bâillements/soupirs. Les programmes dans lesquels les exercices étaient soit supervisés soit non supervisés étaient éligibles, tout comme les techniques de relaxation et la gestion des épisodes aigus, tant qu'il était certain que les exercices de respiration constituaient un élément clé de l'intervention.

Nous avons exclu toute intervention sans exercices de respiration ou dans lesquels les exercices de respiration n'étaient pas essentiels à l'intervention.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont, indépendamment, vérifié les résultats de recherche pour identifier les études éligibles, évalué toutes les études qui semblaient répondre aux critères d’inclusion et extrait les données. Nous avons utilisé des procédures standard recommandées par la Collaboration Cochrane.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus un seul ECR évalué à risque de biais incertain, qui comparait la thérapie de relaxation (n = 15) à la thérapie de relaxation et aux exercices de respiration (n = 15) et à un groupe témoin ne bénéficiant pas d'une thérapie (n = 15).

La qualité de vie n'était pas une mesure de résultat dans cet ECR, et aucune donnée numérique ni analyse statistique n'était présentée dans cet article. Il a été rapporté une réduction significative de la fréquence et de la sévérité des attaques d'hyperventilation dans le groupe réalisant des exercices de respiration par rapport au groupe témoin. Par ailleurs, une différence significative de la fréquence et de la sévérité des attaques d'hyperventilation entre les groupes respiration et relaxation a été signalée. Cependant, aucune information n'a pu être extraite de l'article quant à l'ampleur des effets du traitement.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les résultats de cette revue systématique sont incapables d'informer la pratique clinique, sur la base de l'inclusion d'un seul ECR mal rapporté de petite taille. Il n'existe pas de preuves tangibles de l'efficacité des exercices de respiration pour les symptômes cliniques du SRD/HV. Actuellement on ne sait pas si ces interventions rajoutent un quelconque bénéfice dans ce groupe de patients ou si des types spécifiques d'exercices de respiration sont plus performants que d'autres. Étant donné que les exercices de respiration sont fréquemment utilisés pour traiter le SRD/HV, il existe un besoin urgent d’essais cliniques bien conçus supplémentaires dans ce domaine. Les futurs essais devront être conformes aux recommandations de la déclaration CONSORT en matière de notification et devront utiliser des mesures de résultats appropriées et validées. Les rapports sur les essais devront également garantir une divulgation complète des données pour tous les résultats cliniques importants.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Exercices de respiration pour le traitement du syndrome de respiration dysfonctionnelle/hyperventilation chez l'adulte

Exercices de respiration pour le traitement du syndrome de respiration dysfonctionnelle/hyperventilation

Contexte
Le syndrome de respiration dysfonctionnelle/hyperventilation (SRD/HV) est un trouble de la respiration qui se caractérise par une respiration trop profonde et/ou trop rapide (hyperventilation). Le SRD/HV a de nombreuses causes possibles et s'il n'est pas traité, il peut entraîner divers symptômes désagréables tels que l'essoufflement, les vertiges, les fourmillements et les douleurs thoraciques.

Question traitée dans cette revue
L'objectif de cette revue était de déterminer si les exercices de respiration sont utiles dans le traitement du syndrome de respiration dysfonctionnelle/hyperventilation. L'objectif global de tous les exercices de respiration est d'enseigner aux patients à respirer doucement en utilisant la partie inférieure de leur thorax, à un rythme qui correspond à leur niveau d'activité.

Principaux résultats
Seule une étude, dans laquelle les participants recevaient également une thérapie de relaxation, remplissait les critères d’inclusion de cette revue. Cette étude présentait un petit nombre de participants et fournissait très peu de détails sur sa conception. Bien que le rapport d'essai semble indiquer que les exercices de respiration pourraient être bénéfiques dans le traitement de ce groupe particulier de patients, aucune donnée numérique nous permettant de nous en assurer n'a été présentée. Aucune conclusion fiable ne peut être tirée de cette étude isolée de petite taille.

Ce résumé en langage simplifié Cochrane est à jour de février 2013.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.