Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Herbal medicines for fatty liver diseases

  1. Zhao Lan Liu1,
  2. Liang Zhen Xie2,
  3. Jiang Zhu3,
  4. George Q Li4,
  5. Suzanne J Grant5,
  6. Jian Ping Liu1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 24 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009059.pub2


How to Cite

Liu ZL, Xie LZ, Zhu J, Li GQ, Grant SJ, Liu JP. Herbal medicines for fatty liver diseases. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD009059. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009059.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China

  2. 2

    First Hospital Affiliated to Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Haerbin, Heilongjiang Province, Heilongjiang Province, China

  3. 3

    Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, College of Humanities, Beijing, China

  4. 4

    University of Sydney, Faculty of Pharmacy, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  5. 5

    University of Western Sydney, Center for Complementary Medicine Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

*Jian Ping Liu, Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 11 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100029, China. jianping_l@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 24 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Fatty liver disease is potentially a reversible condition that may lead to end-stage liver disease. Since herbal medicines such as Crataegus pinnatifida and Salvia miltiorrhiza have increasingly been used in the management of fatty liver disease, a systematic review on herbal medicine for fatty liver disease is needed.

Objectives

To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of herbal medicines for people with alcoholic or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Search methods

We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 3, 2012), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to 1 March 2012. We also searched the Chinese BioMedical Database, Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese VIP Information, Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database, and the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database to 2 March 2012.

Selection criteria

We included randomised clinical trials comparing herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, a pharmacological intervention, or a non-pharmacological intervention such as diet or lifestyle, or Western interventions in participants with fatty liver disease.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors extracted data independently. We used the 'risk of bias' tool to assess the risk of bias of the included trials. We assessed the following domains: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting, and other sources of bias. We presented the effects estimates as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) or as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI, depending on the variables of the outcome measures.

Main results

We included 77 randomised clinical trials, which included 6753 participants with fatty liver disease. The risks of bias (overestimation of benefits and underestimation of harms) was high in all trials. The mean sample size was 88 participants (ranging from 40 to 200 participants) per trial. Seventy-five different herbal medicine products were tested. Herbal medicines tested in the randomised trials included single-herb products (Gynostemma pentaphyllum, Panax notoginseng, andPrunus armeniaca), proprietary herbal medicines commercially available, and combination formulas prescribed by practitioners. The most commonly used herbs wereCrataegus pinnatifida,Salvia miltiorrhiza,Alisma orientalis,Bupleurum chinense,Cassia obtusifolia, Astragalus membranaceous, and Rheum palmatum. None of the trials reported death, hepatic-related morbidity, quality of life, or costs. A large number of trials reported positive effects on putative surrogate outcomes such as serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatases, ultrasound, and computed tomography scan. Twenty-seven trials reported adverse effects and found no significant difference between herbal medicines versus control. However, the risk of bias of the included trials was high.

The outcomes were ultrasound findings in 22 trials, liver computed tomography findings in eight trials, aspartate aminotransferase levels in 64 trials, alanine aminotransferase activity in 77 trials, and glutamyltransferase activities in 44 trials. Six herbal medicines showed statistically significant beneficial effects on ultrasound, four on liver computed tomography, 42 on aspartate aminotransferase activity, 49 on alanine aminotransferase activity, three on alkaline phosphatases activity, and 32 on glutamyltransferase activity compared with control interventions.

Authors' conclusions

Some herbal medicines seemed to have positive effects on aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, ultrasound, and computed tomography. We found no significant difference on adverse effects between herbal medicine and control groups. The findings are not conclusive due to the high risk of bias of the included trials and the limited number of trials testing individual herbal medicines. Accordingly, there is also high risk of random errors.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Herbal medicines for fatty liver diseases

Fatty liver disease is a potentially reversible illness where fat builds up within the cells of the liver. It may lead to the liver no longer being able to function properly; this is called end-stage liver disease. This systematic review evaluated the effects and safety of herbal medicines (single herbs, branded herbal medicines, and prescribed formulas) for treating fatty liver disease.

We included 77 randomised clinical trials in this review, which tested 75 herbal medicines. All trials had high risk of systematic errors (ie, bias or risk of overestimation of benefits and overestimation of harms) as well as high risks of random errors (ie, play of chance) due to the small number of people in the trials. Herbal medicines tested in the randomised clinical trials included single-herb products (Gynostemma pentaphyllum,Panax notoginseng, andPrunus armeniaca), commercially available branded herbal medicines, and combination formulas prescribed by practitioners. Herbs most commonly included as an ingredient in different products wereCrataegus pinnatifida,Salvia miltiorrhiza,Alisma orientalis,Bupleurum chinense,Cassia obtusifolia,Astragalus membranaceous, andRheum palmatum. We could not combine the results of the trials due to the range of different herbs used. We could not reach any conclusions about the use of herbal medicines for people with fatty liver disease as none of the trials reported results on death, liver-related illnesses, quality of life, or costs. A number of trials showed positive effects of herbal medicines compared with control interventions on enzyme activity (enzymes are proteins that cause chemical reactions in the body; eg, serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatases), ultrasound scan findings, and computed tomography scan findings. No serious adverse effects were reported for herbal medicines.

However, the methodology of the trials had high risk of systematic errors (bias). Furthermore, the individual herbs were seldomly retested, and all trials had relatively low numbers of people, which increases the risk of random errors (play of chance). Therefore, the findings are inconclusive, and rigorously conducted randomised clinical trials are required to establish the benefits and harms of herbal medicines for fatty liver disease.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Plantes médicinales pour traiter les stéatoses hépatiques

Contexte

La stéatose hépatique est une maladie potentiellement réversible susceptible d'entraîner une hépatopathie terminale. Puisque les plantes médicinales telles que Crataegus pinnatifida et Salvia miltiorrhiza sont de plus en plus utilisées dans le traitement de la stéatose hépatique, une revue systématique portant sur les plantes médicinales dans le traitement de la stéatose hépatique s'imposait.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets bénéfiques et néfastes des plantes médicinales sur les patients atteints d'une stéatose hépatique d'origine alcoolique ou non alcoolique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre spécialisé des essais contrôlés du groupe Cochrane sur les affections hépato-biliaires, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (numéro 3, 2012), MEDLINE, EMBASE, et Science Citation Index Expanded jusqu'au 1er mars 2012. Nous avons également consulté les bases de données Chinese BioMedical Database, Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese VIP Information, Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database et Chinese Dissertation Database, et la base de données Allied and Complementary Medicine Database jusqu'au 1er mars 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais cliniques randomisés ayant comparé des plantes médicinales à un placebo, l'absence de traitement, une intervention pharmacologique, ou une intervention non pharmacologique telle qu'un régime alimentaire ou un changement du mode de vie, ou des interventions occidentales chez les participants atteints de stéatose hépatique.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données de façon indépendante. Nous avons utilisé l'outil « Risque de biais » du groupe Cochrane pour évaluer le risque de biais des essais inclus. Les domaines évalués sont les suivants : génération de la séquence de randomisation, assignation secrète, masquage, données de résultats incomplètes, compte-rendu sélectif et autres sources de biais. Nous avons présenté les estimations des effets sous la forme de risques relatifs (RR) avec intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % ou de différences moyennes (DM) avec IC à 95 %, en fonction des variables des critères de jugement mesurés.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 77 essais cliniques randomisés, totalisant 6 753 participants atteints de stéatose hépatique. Le risque de biais (surestimation des effets bénéfiques et sous-estimation des effets néfastes) était élevé dans tous les essais examinés. L'effectif moyen était de 88 participants (allant de 40 à 200 participants) par essai. Soixante-quinze produits à base de plantes médicinales différentes ont été testés. Les plantes médicinales testées dans les essais cliniques randomisés incluaient des produits à base d'une plante unique (Gynostemma pentaphyllum, Panax notoginseng, et Prunus armeniaca), des plantes médicinales de marque commercialisées, et une combinaison de préparations prescrites par les médecins. Les plantes les plus couramment utilisées étaient Crataegus pinnatifida, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Alisma orientalis, Bupleurum chinense, Cassia obtusifolia, Astragalus membranaceous, et Rheum palmatum. Aucun des essais ne rendait compte de la mortalité, de la morbidité hépatique ni de la qualité de vie ou des coûts. Un grand nombre d'essais ont rapporté des effets positifs sur les résultats du critère de substitution putatif tels que les taux d'aspartate aminotransférase, d'alanine aminotransférase, de glutamyltransférase, de phosphatases alcalines sériques, les résultats des examens échographiques, et les résultats de la tomographie informatisée. Vingt-sept essais ont rapporté des effets indésirables et n'ont trouvé aucune différence significative entre les plantes médicinales et l'intervention témoin. Cependant, le risque de biais était élevé dans tous les essais inclus.

Les critères mesurés étaient les résultats de l'échographie dans 22 essais, de la tomographie informatisée hépatique dans huit essais, les taux d'aspartate aminotransférase dans 64 essais, l'activité alanine aminotransférase dans 77 essais, et les activités glutamyltransférase dans 44 essais. Six plantes médicinales ont révélé des effets bénéfiques statistiquement significatifs sur l'échographie, quatre sur la tomographie informatisée hépatique, 42 sur l'activité aspartate aminotransférase, 49 sur l'activité alanine aminotransférase, trois sur l'activité phosphatases alcalines, et 32 sur l'activité glutamyltransférase comparées aux interventions témoins.

Conclusions des auteurs

Certaines plantes médicinales ont semblé avoir des effets positifs sur l'aspartate aminotransférase, l'alanine aminotransférase, l'échographie et la tomographie informatisée. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune différence significative sur les effets indésirables entre les groupes de plantes médicinales et les groupes témoins. Les résultats ne sont pas concluants compte tenu du risque élevé de biais dans tous les essais inclus et du nombre limité d'essais ayant testé des plantes médicinales individuelles. Par conséquent, le risque d'erreurs aléatoires est également élevé.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Plantes médicinales pour traiter les stéatoses hépatiques

Plantes médicinales pour traiter les stéatoses hépatiques

La stéatose hépatique est une maladie potentiellement réversible dans laquelle des triglycérides s'accumulent dans les hépatocyles. Il peut s'en suivre que le foie n'est plus capable de fonctionner normalement ; c'est ce que l'on appelle une hépatopathie terminale. Cette revue systématique a évalué les effets et l'innocuité des plantes médicinales (plantes uniques, plantes médicinales d'une marque et préparations prescrites) pour traiter les stéatoses hépatiques.

Nous avons inclus 77 essais cliniques randomisés dans cette revue, dans laquelle 75 plantes médicinales ont été testées. Tous les essais présentaient un risque élevé d'erreurs systématiques (c'est-à-dire, biais ou risque de surestimation des effets bénéfiques et sous-estimation des effets néfastes) ainsi que des risques élevés d'erreurs aléatoires (c'est-à-dire, fait du hasard) compte tenu du petit nombre de participants inclus dans les essais. Les plantes médicinales testées dans les essais cliniques randomisés incluaient des produits à base d'une plante unique (Gynostemma pentaphyllum, Panax notoginseng, et Prunus armeniaca), des plantes médicinales de marque commercialisées, et une combinaison de préparations prescrites par les médecins. Les plantes les plus couramment incluses à titre d'ingrédient dans les différents produits étaient Crataegus pinnatifida, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Alisma orientalis, Bupleurum chinense, Cassia obtusifolia, Astragalus membranaceous, et Rheum palmatum. Nous n'avons pas été en mesure de combiner les résultats des essais étant donné l'éventail des différentes plantes utilisées. Nous ne sommes pas parvenus à une conclusion quant à l'utilisation des plantes médicinales chez les patients atteints de stéatose hépatique car aucun des essais ne rapportait de résultats sur la mortalité, la morbidité hépatique ni sur la qualité de vie ou les coûts. Un certain nombre d'essais ont démontré des effets positifs des plantes médicinales comparées aux interventions témoins sur l'activité enzymatique (les enzymes sont des protéines qui provoquent des réactions chimiques dans l'organisme ; par exemple aspartate aminotransférase, alanine aminotransférase, glutamyltransférase, phosphatases alcalines sériques), les résultats des examens échographiques, et les résultats de la tomographie informatisée. Aucun effet indésirable grave dû aux plantes médicinales n'avait été signalé.

Toutefois, la méthodologie des essais présentait un risque élevé d'erreurs systématiques (biais). En outre, les plantes individuelles ont été rarement testées plusieurs fois, et tous les essais comptaient un effectif relativement faible de participants, ce qui accroît le risque d'erreurs aléatoires (fait du hasard). Par conséquent, les résultats ne sont pas concluants, et des essais cliniques randomisés conduits avec rigueur sont nécessaires pour établir les effets bénéfiques et néfastes des plantes médicinales dans le traitement de la stéatose hépatique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.