Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Pathogen-reduced platelets for the prevention of bleeding

  1. Caroline Butler1,
  2. Carolyn Doree2,
  3. Lise J Estcourt3,
  4. Marialena Trivella4,
  5. Sally Hopewell5,
  6. Susan J Brunskill2,
  7. Simon Stanworth3,
  8. Michael F Murphy6,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Haematological Malignancies Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009072.pub2


How to Cite

Butler C, Doree C, Estcourt LJ, Trivella M, Hopewell S, Brunskill SJ, Stanworth S, Murphy MF. Pathogen-reduced platelets for the prevention of bleeding. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD009072. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009072.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Oxford Radcliffe Hospital NHS Trust, Haematology Department, Maidenhead, UK

  2. 2

    NHS Blood and Transplant, Systematic Review Initiative, Oxford, UK

  3. 3

    NHS Blood and Transplant, Haematology/Transfusion Medicine, Oxford, UK

  4. 4

    The Cochrane Collaboration, Cochrane Operations Unit, Oxford, UK

  5. 5

    University of Oxford, Centre for Statistics in Medicine, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK

  6. 6

    John Radcliffe Hospital, NHS Blood and Transplant, Oxford, UK

*Michael F Murphy, NHS Blood and Transplant, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford, OX3 9BQ, UK. mike.murphy@nhsbt.nhs.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Platelet transfusions are used to prevent and treat bleeding in patients who are thrombocytopenic. Despite improvements in donor screening and laboratory testing, a small risk of viral, bacterial or protozoal contamination of platelets remains. There is also an ongoing risk from newly emerging blood transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) for which laboratory tests may not be available at the time of initial outbreak.

One solution to reduce further the risk of TTIs from platelet transfusion is photochemical pathogen reduction, a process by which pathogens are either inactivated or significantly depleted in number, thereby reducing the chance of transmission. This process might offer additional benefits, including platelet shelf-life extension, and negate the requirement for gamma-irradiation of platelets. Although current pathogen-reduction technologies have been proven significantly to reduce pathogen load in platelet concentrates, a number of published clinical studies have raised concerns about the effectiveness of pathogen-reduced platelets for post-transfusion platelet recovery and the prevention of bleeding when compared with standard platelets.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of pathogen-reduced platelets for the prevention of bleeding in patients requiring platelet transfusions.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to 18 February 2013), EMBASE (1980 to 18 February 2013), CINAHL (1982 to 18 February 2013) and the Transfusion Evidence Library (1980 to 18 February 2013). We also searched several international and ongoing trial databases and citation-tracked relevant reference lists. We requested information on possible unpublished trials from known investigators in the field.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the transfusion of pathogen-reduced platelets with standard platelets. We did not identify any RCTs which compared the transfusion of one type of pathogen-reduced platelets with another.

Data collection and analysis

One author screened all references, excluding duplicates and those clearly irrelevant. Two authors then screened the remaining references, confirmed eligibility, extracted data and analysed trial quality independently. We requested and obtained a significant amount of missing data from trial authors. We performed meta-analyses where appropriate using the fixed-effect model for risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD), with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), and used the I² statistic to explore heterogeneity, employing the random-effects model when I² was greater than 30%.

Main results

We included 10 trials comparing pathogen-reduced platelets with standard platelets. Nine trials assessed Intercept® pathogen-reduced platelets and one trial Mirasol® pathogen-reduced platelets. Two were randomised cross-over trials and the remaining eight were parallel-group RCTs. In total, 1422 participants were available for analysis across the 10 trials, of which 675 participants received Intercept® and 56 Mirasol® platelet transfusions. Four trials assessed the response to a single study platelet transfusion (all Intercept®) and six to multiple study transfusions (Intercept® (N = 5), Mirasol® (N = 1)) compared with standard platelets.

We found the trials to be generally at low risk of bias but heterogeneous regarding the nature of the interventions (platelet preparation), protocols for platelet transfusion, definitions of outcomes, methods of outcome assessment and duration of follow-up.

Our primary outcomes were mortality, 'any bleeding', 'clinically significant bleeding' and 'severe bleeding', and were grouped by duration of follow-up: short (up to 48 hours), medium (48 hours to seven days) or long (more than seven days). Meta-analysis of data from five trials of multiple platelet transfusions reporting 'any bleeding' over a long follow-up period found an increase in bleeding in those receiving pathogen-reduced platelets compared with standard platelets using the fixed-effect model (RR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.15, I² = 59%); however, this meta-analysis showed no difference between treatment arms when using the random-effects model (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.38).

There was no evidence of a difference between treatment arms in the number of patients with 'clinically significant bleeding' (reported by four out of the same five trials) or 'severe bleeding' (reported by all five trials) (respectively, RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.21, I² = 2%; RR 1.27, 95% CI 0.76 to 2.12, I² = 51%). We also found no evidence of a difference between treatment arms for all-cause mortality, acute transfusion reactions, adverse events, serious adverse events and red cell transfusion requirements in the trials which reported on these outcomes. No bacterial transfusion-transmitted infections occurred in the six trials that reported this outcome.

Although the definition of platelet refractoriness differed between trials, the relative risk of this event was 2.74 higher following pathogen-reduced platelet transfusion (RR 2.74, 95% CI 1.84 to 4.07, I² = 0%). Participants required 7% more platelet transfusions following pathogen-reduced platelet transfusion when compared with standard platelet transfusion (MD 0.07, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.11, I² = 21%), although the interval between platelet transfusions was only shown to be significantly shorter following multiple Intercept® pathogen-reduced platelet transfusion when compared with standard platelet transfusion (MD -0.51, 95% CI -0.66 to -0.37, I² = 0%). In trials of multiple pathogen-reduced platelets, our analyses showed the one- and 24-hour count and corrected count increments to be significantly inferior to standard platelets. However, one-hour increments were similar in trials of single platelet transfusions, although the 24-hour count and corrected count increments were again significantly lower.

Authors' conclusions

We found no evidence of a difference in mortality, 'clinically significant' or 'severe bleeding', transfusion reactions or adverse events between pathogen-reduced and standard platelets. For a range of laboratory outcomes the results indicated evidence of some benefits for standard platelets over pathogen-reduced platelets. These conclusions are based on data from 1422 patients included in 10 trials. Results from ongoing or new trials are required to determine if there are clinically important differences in bleeding risk between pathogen-reduced platelet transfusions and standard platelet transfusions. Given the variability in trial design, bleeding assessment and quality of outcome reporting, it is recommended that future trials apply standardised approaches to outcome assessment and follow-up, including safety reporting.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Platelet transfusions, treated to reduce transfusion-transmitted infections, for the prevention of bleeding in patients with low platelet counts

Blood for transfusion is collected from donors and then processed and stored as bags of different blood components. One of these components is platelets. Platelets are cells which help the body form clots and prevent bleeding. As for all transfusions, there are risks related to giving platelets to patients, including a small risk of transfusion-transmitted infections. A number of methods are used to minimise the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections, including careful selection of donors and rigorous donor testing. One new method of preventing infection is pathogen reduction by which, through a process of adding chemicals to the donated platelets and exposing them to a wavelength of ultraviolet light, the number of infecting organisms can be reduced.

The aim of this review was to assess whether these specially treated, pathogen-reduced platelets, work as effectively as normal platelets when transfused. Specifically, can they stop or prevent bleeding as well as standard platelets, do they produce the same increase in platelet count and does their use affect further transfusion requirements? Also, this review assessed whether pathogen-reduced platelets are as safe as normal platelets - for example, are they associated with any difference in the rate of death following transfusion and are there any side effects associated with the use of these products?

Ten randomised controlled trials, involving 1422 patients, were included assessing two different pathogen-reduced platelet transfusion products, Intercept® and Mirasol® platelets, as compared with standard platelets. Nine trials assessed Intercept® platelets and one trial Mirasol® platelets. The 10 trials had different designs with varying methods of outcome assessment and durations of follow-up.

Bleeding was assessed as 'any bleeding', 'clinically significant' and 'severe' at short (up to 48 hours) or long (more than seven days) follow-up periods. There was no difference in 'clinically significant' or 'severe bleeding', mortality, transfusion reactions or adverse events between pathogen-reduced and standard platelets. However, there were significantly poorer responses following the transfusion of pathogen-reduced platelets with a requirement for more platelet transfusions.

Due to the limitations of the trial sizes and their designs, there is not enough evidence available to be sure that pathogen-reduced platelets work as effectively as standard platelets to prevent bleeding.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Plaquettes à pathogènes réduits pour la prévention des saignements

Contexte

Les transfusions de plaquettes sont utilisées pour empêcher et traiter les saignements chez des patients qui sont thrombocytopéniques. Malgré des améliorations concernant le dépistage des donneurs et les tests en laboratoire, il subsiste un faible risque de contamination des plaquettes par des virus, des bactéries ou des protozoaires. Il existe également un risque persistant dû à de nouvelles infections émergentes transmises lors des transfusions sanguines (ITT) pour lesquelles il peut ne pas exister de tests de laboratoire au moment de la première manifestation.

Une solution pour réduire encore le risque d'ITT lors d'une transfusion de plaquettes consiste en une réduction photochimique des pathogènes, un procédé par lequel les pathogènes sont inactivés ou leur nombre est diminué significativement, ce qui réduit ainsi le risque de transmission. Ce procédé pourrait apporter des bénéfices supplémentaires, notamment un allongement de la durée de conservation des plaquettes, et rendre inutile l'irradiation des plaquettes aux rayons gamma. Bien qu'il existe des preuves significatives indiquant que les technologies actuelles de réduction des pathogènes réduisent la charge de pathogènes dans les concentrés de plaquettes, un certain nombre d'études cliniques publiées ont soulevé des inquiétudes concernant l'efficacité des plaquettes à pathogènes réduits pour la récupération des plaquettes après la transfusion et concernant la prévention des saignements comparé aux plaquettes standard.

Objectifs

Evaluer l'efficacité des plaquettes à pathogènes réduits pour la prévention des saignements chez les patients nécessitant des transfusions de plaquettes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2013, numéro 1), MEDLINE (de 1950 au 18 février 2013), EMBASE (de 1980 au 18 février 2013), CINAHL (de 1982 au 18 février 2013) et la Transfusion Evidence Library (de 1980 au 18 février 2013). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans plusieurs bases de données internationales et plusieurs bases de données d'essais en cours et avons passé au crible les bibliographies pertinentes. Nous avons demandé des informations sur d'éventuels essais non publiés à des chercheurs connus dans ce domaine.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant la transfusion de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits à celle de plaquettes standard. Nous n'avons identifié aucune ECR qui comparait la transfusion d'un type de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits à un autre.

Recueil et analyse des données

Un auteur a examiné toutes les références, à l'exception des doublons et de celles clairement non pertinentes. Deux auteurs ont ensuite examiné les références restantes, confirmé l'éligibilité, extrait les données et analysé la qualité des essais de façon indépendante. Nous avons demandé et obtenu une quantité significative de données manquantes auprès des auteurs des essais. Lorsque cela était approprié, nous avons procédé à des méta-analyses en utilisant le modèle à effets fixes pour les risques relatifs (RR) ou les différences moyennes (DM), avec des intervalles de confiance à 95 % (IC à 95 %), et avons utilisé la statistique I² pour étudier l'hétérogénéité, en ayant recours au modèle à effets aléatoires lorsque I² était supérieur à 30 %.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 10 essais comparant des plaquettes à pathogènes réduits à des plaquettes standard. Neuf essais évaluaient les plaquettes à pathogènes réduits Intercept® et un essai évaluait les plaquettes à pathogènes réduits Mirasol®. Deux étaient des essais croisés randomisés et les huit autres étaient des ECR en groupes parallèles. Au total, dans les 10 essais, 1 422 participants étaient disponibles pour l'analyse, dont 675 recevaient des transfusions de plaquettes Intercept® et 56 recevaient des transfusions de plaquettes Mirasol®. Quatre essais évaluaient la réaction à une seule transfusion de plaquettes étudiées (toutes Intercept®) et six à de multiples transfusions de plaquettes étudiées (Intercept® (N = 5), Mirasol® (N = 1)) comparé à des plaquettes standard.

Nous avons découvert que les essais présentaient généralement un faible risque de biais, mais qu'ils étaient hétérogènes concernant la nature des interventions (préparation de plaquettes), les protocoles pour la transfusion de plaquettes, les définitions des critères de jugement, les méthodes d'évaluation des critères et la durée du suivi.

Nos critères de jugement principaux étaient la mortalité, « tout saignement », les « saignements cliniquement significatifs » et les « saignements graves » et étaient regroupés par durée de suivi : courtes (jusqu'à 48 heures), moyennes (de 48 heures à sept jours) ou longues (plus de sept jours). La méta-analyse des données de cinq essais portant sur de multiples transfusions de plaquettes et rapportant « tout saignement » sur une longue période de suivi a constaté une augmentation des saignements chez les personnes recevant des plaquettes à pathogènes réduits comparé aux plaquettes standard en utilisant le modèle à effets fixes (RR 1,09, IC à 95 % 1,02 à 1,15, I² = 59 %) ; cependant, cette méta-analyse n'a montré aucune différence entre les bras de traitement lors de l'utilisation du modèle à effets aléatoires (RR 1,14, IC à 95 % 0,93 à 1,38).

Il n'y a eu aucune preuve d'une différence entre les bras de traitement concernant le nombre de patients ayant des « saignements cliniquement significatifs » (rapportés par quatre des cinq mêmes essais) ou des « saignements graves » (rapportés par les cinq essais) (respectivement, RR 1,06, IC à 95 % 0,93 à 1,21, I² = 2 % ; RR 1,27, IC à 95 % 0,76 à 2,12, I² = 51 %). Nous n'avons par ailleurs trouvé aucune différence entre les bras de traitement concernant la mortalité toutes causes confondues, les réactions aiguës à la transfusion, les événements indésirables, les événements indésirables graves et les besoins de transfusion de globules rouges dans les essais qui rapportaient ces critères de jugement. Aucune infection bactérienne transmise par la transfusion n'est survenue dans les six essais qui rapportaient ce critère de jugement.

Bien que la définition de la réaction réfractaire aux plaquettes ait été différente entre les essais, le risque relatif de cet événement a été plus élevé de 2,74 après une transfusion de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits (RR 2,74, IC à 95 % 1,84 à 4,07, I² = 0 %). Les participants ont nécessité 7 % de transfusions de plaquettes en plus après une transfusion de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits comparé à une transfusion de plaquettes standard (DM 0,07, IC à 95 % 0,03 à 0,11, I² = 21 %), bien que l'intervalle entre les transfusions de plaquettes ne se soit révélé significativement plus court qu'après de multiples transfusions de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits Intercept® comparé à la transfusion de plaquettes standard (DM -0,51, IC à 95 % -0,66 à -0,37, I² = 0 %). Dans les essais portant sur de multiples transfusions de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits, nos analyses ont montré que les incréments de la numération et de la numération corrigée à une et à 24 heures ont été significativement inférieurs à ceux avec les plaquettes standard. Cependant, les incréments à une heure ont été semblables dans les essais portant sur des transfusions de plaquettes uniques, bien que les incréments de la numération et de la numération corrigée à 24 heures aient été encore une fois significativement plus faibles.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve d'une différence concernant la mortalité, les saignements « cliniquement significatifs » ou les « saignements graves », les réactions à la transfusion ou les événements indésirables entre les plaquettes à pathogènes réduits et les plaquettes standard. Pour un certain nombre de critères de laboratoire, les résultats ont fourni des preuves de certains bénéfices pour les plaquettes standard comparé aux plaquettes à pathogènes réduits. Ces conclusions sont basées sur des données provenant de 1 422 patients inclus dans 10 essais. Des résultats d'essais en cours ou de nouveaux essais sont requis pour déterminer s'il existe des différences importantes concernant le risque de saignement entre les transfusions de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits et les transfusions de plaquettes standard. Du fait de la variabilité du plan d'étude, de l'évaluation des saignements et de la qualité de la notification des critères de jugement, il est recommandé que les essais futurs appliquent des approches standardisées pour l'évaluation des critères et le suivi, notamment pour la notification de la sécurité.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Plaquettes à pathogènes réduits pour la prévention des saignements

Transfusions de plaquettes traitées pour réduire les infections transmises lors de la transfusion pour la prévention des saignements chez les patients ayant une faible numération plaquettaire

Le sang destiné aux transfusions est prélevé sur des donneurs, puis traité et stocké dans des poches de différents composants sanguins. Les plaquettes sont l'un de ces composants. Les plaquettes sont des cellules qui aident le corps à former des caillots et à empêcher les saignements. Comme pour toutes les transfusions, il existe des risques liés à l'administration de plaquettes aux patients, notamment un faible risque d'infections transmises lors de la transfusion. Un certain nombre de méthodes sont utilisées pour réduire le risque d'infections transmises lors de la transfusion, notamment une sélection minutieuse et un dépistage rigoureux des donneurs. Une nouvelle méthode de prévention de l'infection consiste en la réduction des pathogènes qui permet, par un procédé d'addition de produits chimiques aux plaquettes données et d'exposition de ces plaquettes à une longueur d'onde de lumière ultraviolette, de réduire le nombre d'organismes infectieux.

L'objectif de cette revue était de déterminer si ces plaquettes à pathogènes réduits, ayant subi un traitement spécial, sont aussi efficaces que les plaquettes normales lorsqu'elles sont transfusées. Concrètement, peuvent-elles stopper ou prévenir les saignements aussi bien que des plaquettes ordinaires, produisent-elles la même augmentation de la numération plaquettaire et leur utilisation affecte-t-elle les besoins de transfusion ultérieurs ? Par ailleurs, cette revue a déterminé si les plaquettes à pathogènes réduits étaient aussi sûres que les plaquettes normales, par exemple si elles étaient associées à une différence en termes de taux de décès après une transfusion et s'il existait des effets secondaires associés à l'utilisation de ces produits ?

Nous avons inclus dix essais contrôlés randomisés, portant sur un total de 1 422 patients, qui évaluaient deux produits de transfusion de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits différents, les plaquettes Intercept® et Mirasol®, comparé à des plaquettes standard. Neuf essais évaluaient les plaquettes Intercept® et un essai évaluait les plaquettes Mirasol®. Les 10 essais avaient des plans d'étude différents et des méthodes d'évaluation des critères et des durées de suivi différentes.

Les saignements étaient évalués comme « tout saignement », des saignements « cliniquement significatifs » et « graves » après des périodes de suivi courtes (jusqu'à 48 heures) ou longues (plus de sept jours). Il n'y avait aucune différence concernant les saignements « cliniquement significatifs » ou les « saignements graves », la mortalité, les réactions à la transfusion ou les événements indésirables entre les plaquettes à pathogènes réduits et les plaquettes standard. Cependant, on a constaté des réponses significativement moins bonnes après la transfusion de plaquettes à pathogènes réduits, ainsi que la nécessité d'effectuer plus de transfusions de plaquettes.

En raison des limitations liées aux tailles des essais et aux plans d'études, il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves disponibles pour être certains que les plaquettes à pathogènes réduits soient aussi efficaces que les plaquettes standard pour empêcher les saignements.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�